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How Can Fragile and Conflict-Affected States Improve Their Legitimacy With Their People?

Fragility, conflict, and violence affect development outcomes for more than two billion people. This poses a particular challenge to development organizations, governments, and NGOs alike.

On December 5, 2016, the World Bank and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy convened a day-long conference to discuss some of these challenges, share the latest research, and exchange knowledge and experience from the field.

To access the entire conference report How Can Fragile and Conflict-Affected States Improve Their Legitimacy With Their People?, kindly click on the link.

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In the Shadow of “No”: Peace after Colombia’s Plebiscite

Defeat by a wafer-thin margin in the October 2016 plebiscite on the peace agreement between the government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) insurgency shocked Colombia’s society and political establishment, as well as the accord’s international backers. A revised accord, with numerous changes demanded by opposition leaders, was unveiled less than two months later, but the illusion of consensus was short-lived. Peace with the guerrillas is again set to polarise parties and candidates in elections in 2018.  A swift, effective start to implementation of the accord is needed to reverse public wariness and political resistance.

For full access to In the Shadow of “No”: Peace after Colombia’s Plebiscite, kindly follow the link.

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Myanmar - National Ceasefire Agreement 2015 - English Version

Myanmar National Ceasefire Agreement (NCA)

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Myanmar Constitution 2008

Constitution of the Republic of the Union of Myanmar

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Civil Society’s Role in Monitoring and Verifying Peace Agreements: Seven Lessons from International Experiences

This report summarizes the available evidence about civil society’s role in monitoring and verification activities around the world in recent decades. The inclusion of civil society in monitoring and verification has so far been limited. With some notable exceptions, the full capacities of civil society organizations have not been embraced by policy makers or negotiation parties, but this report shows that civil society has much to offer, particularly in the monitoring of intra-state peace agreements.

For full access to the Civil Society’s Role in Monitoring and Verifying Peace Agreements: Seven Lessons from International Experiences, kindly follow the link.

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