Policy and Research Papers

The Privatisation of security in Africa: Challenges and lessons from Côte d’Ivoire, Mali and Senegal

Private security in Africa is booming. Whether from the perspective of major multinational players or small-scale local enterprises, the market for commercial security has expanded and evolved over  recent years. However, policy makers rarely address private security, national parliaments and regulatory bodies provide limited oversight in this area, and the attention of African media and civil society is localized and sporadic. In short, a fundamental shift in the African security landscape is taking place under the radar of democratic governance. The Privatisation of Security in Africa – Challenges and Lessons from Côte d’Ivoire, Mali and Senegal provides expert accounts which portray the realities of the contemporary private security industry in Africa. The volume analyses key characteristics of security privatisation in Africa, offers new insights into the significance of this phenomenon from a security sector governance perspective and identifies specific entry points that should inform processes to promote good governance of the security sector in Africa.

To access the full report The Privatisation of security in Africa: Challenges and lessons from Côte d’Ivoire, Mali and Senegal, kindly click on the link.

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Why does police reform appear to have been more successful in Georgia than in Kyrgyzstan or Russia?

Reform has been relatively successful in Georgia because, after the Rose Revolution, the new government used its dominance of the state to fire a huge number of officers, purge the old leadership, and instigate a crackdown on police corruption and links with organised crime. This took place in the background of a strong public demand for reform and a state-building process which dramatically reduced public sector corruption and altered state-society relations. In Kyrgyzstan and Russia, neither top-down nor bottom-up pressure has manifested itself into political pressure for reform. In the former, the state has been highly contested and powerful factions have competed to use it to extract resources for their own benefit and/or those of their constituents. In Russia, the state is more stable, but the leadership lacks the know-how or the willingness to implement meaningful reform. Instead of reform being imposed upon each country’s Ministry of Interior, reforms have been co-opted by elements within the ministries, with the result that they have been ineffective.

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Munich Security Report 2017 Post-Truth, Post-West, Post-Order?

Entitled "Post-Truth, Post-West, Post-Order?", the Munich Security Report 2017 offers analyses, data, statistics, infographics, and maps on major developments and challenges in international security. The report aims to serve as a companion and conversation starter for the discussions at the Munich Security Conference 2017 and as background reading for participants. At the same time, it is also made available to the interested public. Last year's report was downloaded more than 25,000 times, with significant press coverage in both German and international media. Twitter discussions about the report are led under #MSCreport and the hashtag for the Munich Security Conference, #MSC2017.

Central topics of the new edition include the crises of the international order and of liberal democracy as well as European security and defense policy. In addition, the report assembles information on the jihadist threat, the manipulation and "weaponization" of information, and the security situation in the Pacific and the Middle East. 

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Understanding International Police Organisations: What the Researchers Do Not See

A dappled mix of politics, bureaucratic conservatism and ability of individuals means that the aperture for introducing and instantiating change in the organizations working on international policing is much smaller than that imagined by the global police studies community. Research needs to be better grounded in implementation realities. The article suggests some changes in practice on the part of researchers that could increase the likelihood of their work being acted upon.

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Rethinking Timorese Identity as a Peacebuilding Strategy: The Lorosa’e – Loromonu Conflict from a Traditional Perspective

Since 2006 East Timor has been faced with a crisis of internal conflict. A deepening regional and social division has become tangible for the first time since independence. This conflict or division was defined by animosities, distrust and eventually street fights between people considered to be either of Lorosa’e (Eastern) or Loromonu (Western) region and background. Violence erupted out of widespread perceptions that discrimination against such regional groupings permeated state institutions, particularly in the security sector. From here unrest spread and led to the large-scale displacement of parts of the population that is still ongoing. The most significant damage caused by this crisis was to the internal relationships that had until then bound the country together. This article is an attempt to analyse the impact of the government-sponsored dialogue and peace-making initiatives by international actors present in East Timor on the root causes underlying the eruption of violence. 

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