International Peace Institute

The International Peace Institute is an independent, international not-for-profit think tank with a staff representing more than 20 nationalities. IPI is dedicated to promoting the prevention and settlement of conflicts between and within states by strengthening international peace and security institutions.  To achieve its purpose, IPI employs a mix of policy research, convening, publishing and outreach.

Telephone: +1-212 687-4300
Fax: +1-212 983-8246
Email: ipi@ipinst.org
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Policy Analyst - MENA

Location: Manama, Bahrain
Application Contact: ( employment@ipinst.org)

The International Peace Institute (IPI) is currently seeking a Policy Analyst to support its programs administration and research for IPI’s office in Manama, Bahrain. Responsibilities will involve a mix of research, program administration, and organizing of policy events, roundtables and seminars in Manama and other locations, primarily in the Middle East and North Africa region. Approximately sixty percent of the Policy Analyst’s time will be devoted to organizational, administrative and fund development support and forty percent to research support. 

The position will be filled as soon as a successful candidate is identified. For additional information on this vacancy, kindly follow the link. 

Vacancy

Case Studies

UN Mediation and the Politics of Transition after Constitutional Crises

Context

When a coup d'état or unconstitutional change of government happens, how does the UN respond? This is the question addressed in IPI's latest policy paper: UN Mediation and the Politics of Transition after Constitutional Crises by Charles T. Call.Examining the UN's experience in dealing with such political crises in Kenya, Mauritania, Guinea, Madagascar, and Kyrgyzstan between 2008 and 2011, this report identifies trends across the cases and draws lessons regarding the role of international mediation and the transitional political arrangements that emerged.

Selected Resources

Strengthening the UN's Mediation Support Unit, whose standby team of thematic experts have been successfully deployed in several cases;In order to ensure a principled, coherent, and effective response that prevents the escalation of violence and facilitates a country's return to constitutional order, Call recommends:

  • expanding and adequately resourcing UN regional offices, which have made singular contributions to mediation efforts;
  • appointing mediators with prior professional experience in other multilateral organizations, who can contribute to effective collaboration among international and regional organizations;
  • preparing the UN more systematically for addressing electoral disputes;
  • enhancing communication between the UN Department of Political Affairs and resident coordinators on the ground;
  • creating effective UN mechanisms to monitor transitional arrangements, including power sharing arrangements and other efforts for reconciliation, justice, and conflict-sensitive development.
  • Interestingly, Call argues that the UN should be cautious about adopting a blanket policy of denouncing all departures from constitutional order.
Case Study

Videos

States in Transition: Ensuring Equal Rights and Participation for All

The Fifth Annual Trygve Lie Symposium on Fundamental Freedoms focused on the challenges and opportunities for countries to ensure that marginalized groups, particularly women and minorities, gain equal access to political, social, and economic institutions and decision-making processes, and how to forestall manipulation by forces opposed to democracy.

Video

Preventing Mass Atrocities: How Can the UN Security Council Do Better?

On Saturday, September 26th IPI, together with The Elders, and the Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect, co-hosted a high-level panel discussion which looked at ways to improve the Security Council’s ability to prevent and halt the commission of mass atrocity crimes.

More on the webcast Preventing Mass Atrocities: How Can the UN Security Council Do Better?

Video

Leadership and Global Partnerships in the Face of Today’s Refugee Crisis

On November 20th, IPI together with the Permanent Mission of Sweden cohosted an IPI Global Leaders Series event featuring UN High Commissioner for Refugees António Guterres, who discussed leadership and global partnerships in the face of today’s refugee crisis. 

View the event page here: Leadership and Global Partnerships in the Face of Today’s Refugee Crisis

Video

Social Inclusion, Political Participation, and Effective Governance in Challenging Environments

On November 18th, the Independent Commission on Multilateralism hosted its second Public Consultation on its Discussion Paper on “Social Inclusion, Political Participation, and Effective Governance in Challenging Environments.”

Access to the full webcast: Social Inclusion, Political Participation, and Effective Governance in Challenging Environments

Video

Twenty-First Century Peacebuilding International Expert Forum

On November 17th, IPI together with the Folke Bernadotte Academy, SecDev Foundation and ZIF cohosted a global gathering of leading academics, experts, and policy makers focused on the next generation of peace and security challenges.

Full webcast available here: Twenty-First Century Peacebuilding International Expert Forum

Video

Sustainable Development and the World Drug Problem

On Monday, November 16th, IPI together with the Conflict Prevention and Peace Forum cohosted a panel discussion on the UN General Assembly Special Session on the World Drug Problem (UNGASS) and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Access to the page of the webcast: Sustainable Development and the World Drug Problem

Video

ICM Public Consultation on Women, Peace & Security

On November 4th, the Independent Commission on Multilateralism (ICM) hosted its first Public Consultation focusing on the findings and recommendations of the Women, Peace, And Security Discussion Paper, and providing an opportunity to reflect on the recent fifteenth anniversary of UN Security Council Resolution 1325.

More details here: ICM Public Consultation on Women, Peace & Security

Video

Governance, Peacebuilding, and State-Society Relations

A panel of academics, experts, and policy-makers considered the next generation of peace and security challenges at this year’s International Expert Forum on governance, peacebuilding, and state-society relations, part of IEF’s series on 21st-century peacebuilding.

The November 17th seminar was the sixth in an annual series held at IPI. Participants aimed to develop stronger policymaking in consolidating peace and building inclusive and ultimately more resilient societies.

Please kindly follow the link to learn more: Governance, Peacebuilding, and State-Society Relations

Video

Refugees & Migrants: Interview with Jean Marie Guehenno

Watch Jean Marie Guehenno speak with International Peace Institute Senior Adviser Warren Hoge as part of a Global Observatory interview series on international migration and the refugee crisis.

"What we see is that crises are much harder to end today than they were 20 years ago because the agendas have become more complicated, more transnational, and once conflict starts you really don’t know when it ends,” he said, as he stressed the need to focus on conflict prevention.

Mr. Guéhenno also called on developed countries to do more to respond to the humanitarian crises being created by these protracted conflicts.

For full access of the video Refugees & Migrants: Interview with Jean Marie Guehenno, kindly follow the link.

Video

Perilous Interventions: The Security Council and the Politics of Chaos

On Tuesday, October 25th, IPI hosted a discussion on the UN Security Council and military interventions with Hardeep Singh Puri, author of Perilous Interventions: The Security Council and the Politics of Chaos.

For full access of the video Perilous Interventions: The Security Council and the Politics of Chaos, kindly follow the link.

Video

Addressing the Refugee Situation in Palestine

Pierre Krähenbühl, the head of the UNRWA speaking at the International Peace Institute on the situation of Palestinian Refugees. 

Video

Preventing Violent Extremism: The Challenges Ahead

IPI together with The Prevention Project: Organizing Against Violent Extremism, and the Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP) cohosted a policy forum event to discuss the challenges facing the multilateral system in preventing violent extremism.

For details and full access to the video Preventing Violent Extremism: The Challenges Ahead, kindly follow the link.

Video

Policy and Research Papers

Towards Enhanced Legitimacy of Rule of Law Programs in Multidimensional Peace Operations

In this paper, I will analyze the connections between the multilateral debates and external agendas, on the one hand, and the implementation of rule of law strategies in the field, on the other. The first part of the paper will start with a brief historical overview of the emergence of international support for rule of law institutions and its progressive inclusion into conflict management strategies. I will then proceed with an analysis of the state of the multilateral debate and of the concept of ‘local ownership’, with a view to identify why rule of law programs still suffer from a lack of legitimacy at the multilateral and operational levels.

Paper

Advancing the Rule of Law Agenda at the 67th General Assembly

Since 2004, the rule of law has gained solid attention in the UN community. This year, on September 24th, there is an opportunity to mark a milestone in enhancing its role in the global effort to rebuild societies after conflict, support transitions
and economic growth, and strengthen state institutions. For the first time, the United Nations General Assembly will devote its opening high-level event to the topic.

Over the course of the last twenty years, attention around the rule of law has increased in many different contexts and fora. While its precise definition remains elusive, a sizable “industry” on the rule of law has developed, with its agencies, programs, and scholars. Different views on the precise notion and scope of the rule of law, however, are emerging as we approach the high-level event, making the attempt to adopt a consensual political declaration a painful exercise. A breakthrough is still possible, if additional political e ort is made in the final steps.

To view this publication, please follow this link

Paper

What Army for Haiti?

President Michel Martelly of Haiti was widely expected to announce the creation of a new Haitian army on November 18, 2011. Instead, the newly-elected president called for the creation of a civilian-led commission that will have forty days to finalize a plan for the army, which was disbanded in 1995. A draft of the “Martelly plan,” dated August 2011, called for building an army of 3,500 troops that would be operational within three years and progressively take over as the UN peacekeeping force MINUSTAH withdraws.
This issue brief by Arthur Boutellis, IPI Senior Policy Analyst, provides a background to the security sector in Haiti and explores the shape that a new Haitian army might take. It addresses the political context in which the army will be reinstated, financial considerations for the government of Haiti, and the role that the international community could play to support Haitian efforts to build an accountable security sector.

To view this publication, please follow this link.

Paper

Conflict Prevention and Preventive Diplomacy: What Works and What Doesn't?

The purpose of the first International Expert Forum, “Conflict Prevention and Preventive Diplomacy: What Works and What Doesn’t?,” was to explore the theory and practice of preventive diplomacy and conflict prevention. Launched at the International Peace Institute (IPI) in New York on December 15, 2011, the forum is a joint collaboration of the Folke Bernadotte Academy, the SecDev Group, IPI, and the Social Science Research Council (SSRC). The first forum was divided into three sessions: insights from research; insights from the field; and a stock-taking session focusing on the implications of research and analysis for policy and practice.

To view this publication, please follow this link.

Paper

Justice Under International Administration: Kosovo, East Timor and Afghanistan

This report will examine some questions relating to the delivery of justice in countries and territories under international administration through the experiences of United Nations administrations in Kosovo (1999— ) and East Timor (1999-2002) and the assistance mission in Afghanistan (2002— ). Though the United Nations had exercised varying measures of executive power in previous missions, notably West Papua (1962-1963), Cambodia (1992-1993), and Eastern Slavonia (1996-1998), Kosovo and East Timor were the first occasions on which the UN exercised full judicial power within a territory.

To view this article, please follow this link.

Paper

State-building and Constitutional Design after Conflict

This paper examines the strengths and weaknesses of constitutional choices made after conflict, drawing upon comparative studies of six constitutions and peace agreements. The paper attempts to synthesize the practical lessons drawn from the cases, with a focus on (i) the constitution-making process; (ii) the extent of reliance on executive and geographical power-sharing; (iii) the viability of checks and balances; (iv) the electoral model; (v) the role of political parties in the transition; and (vi) issues of implementation.

To view this publication, please follow this link

Paper

Elections and Stability in West Africa

This meeting note summarizes the discussions at a conference organized by the United Nations Office for West Africa (UNOWA) in Praia, Cape Verde on May 18-20, 2011. The conference addressed the need for a sustained effort to strengthen electoral processes in West Africa as a means to consolidate peace and democracy in the region. 

Many West African countries face numerous challenges in organizing free, fair, and peaceful elections, and the conference discussed the existing regional and national frameworks that support democracy and electoral processes in the subregion. Best practices and lessons learned from recent electoral processes in Cape Verde, Ghana, and Niger were shared, with a view to informing the organization of upcoming elections in neighboring countries. The role and modalities of electoral assistance were also discussed, supported by concrete cases of UNDP’s electoral initiatives in Niger and Guinea. 
The conference further underlined the importance of collaborative initiatives in strengthening democratic processes and preventing conflict. Finally, key standards, processes, and actors that can help to build democracy and stability were discussed: human rights and gender-equality norms, electoral litigation, and the role of security forces and the media during electoral processes all present opportunities to reduce election-related violence and improve election outcomes in West Africa.
The note also reprints the full text of the “Praia Declaration on Elections and Stability in West Africa,” which was adopted at the close of the conference.

To view this publication, please follow this link.

Paper

The Security Sector in Cote d’Ivoire: A Source of Conflict and a Key to Peace

A new IPI report identifies the security sector in Côte d’Ivoire as a root of a decade of crises there and discusses how comprehensive security-sector reform is a key to preventing a return to armed conflict in the future. 
The report provides a historical perspective as to how the Defense and Security Forces in Côte d’Ivoire were at the root of the 2002 crisis, why successive peace accords failed to produce security sector reform, and how the failure to reunify the Ivoirian security forces prior to holding the 2010 presidential election was a key factor behind the recent crisis and contributed to its escalation into a military confrontation. 
The report also includes recommendations on how to focus reform on changing the relationship among politicians, security institutions, and the larger population, as part of a broader reconciliation process among Ivoirians themselves.

To view this publication, please follow this link.

Paper

Security-Sector Reform Applied: Nine Ways to Move from Policy to Implementation

Security sector reform (SSR) remains a relatively new and evolving concept, one that brings together practitioners and academics from many different backgrounds. The application of SSR differs from one context to the other, each with its own complications.
However, most of the writing on SSR has a policy focus rather than dealing with the practical issues of implementation. Not much focuses on the “little secrets and skills” required to practically apply SSR policy in post-conflict settings.

This policy paper provides nine recommendations for practitioners to increase their effectiveness in supporting SSR processes in such contexts. While local context should determine how SSR is implemented, these recommendations can help practitioners to accelerate progress on the ground. Though not an exhaustive list, small, smart steps, the paper argues, can go a long way.

The paper’s recommendations on how to practically apply SSR policy are:

1. Locate entry points for ownership
2. Decentralize via second-generation SSR
3. Understand the context, be flexible, and take an iterative approach
4. Reduce uncertainty and build up trust
5. Forge relations between police investigators and prosecutors
6. Support sustainable reforms
7. Build up the “missing middle” within the civil service
8. Consider a low-tech approach for higher yields
9. Put the right skills and systems in place

About the authors:
Rory Keane is the SSR advisor to the head of the UN mission in Liberia.
Mark Downes is Head of the International Security Sector Advisory Team (ISSAT) at the Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces (DCAF).

To view this article, please follow this link.

Paper

Planning Ahead for a Postconflict Syria: Lessons from Iraq, Lebanon, and Yemen

Though the conflict in Syria shows no signs of abating, and hopes for the Geneva II talks in January are dim, this paper argues it is never too early to start planning for peace. The paper examines three recent post-conflict transitions in the Middle East—Iraq, Lebanon, and Yemen—and draws lessons for Syria. Among them are the following:

  • Drawing from the US experience in Iraq, Bennett argues that while elements of the current regime in Syria may need to go, the state must remain strong to promote stability and encourage post-conflict economic growth.
  • Drawing lessons from the Taif Agreement in Lebanon, Bennett argues that Syrians must avoid official sectarianism and focus on establishing a cohesive national identity.
  • Drawing from the role of the GCC in the Yemen transition, Bennett argues that regional cooperation, especially on the issue of Syrian refugees, will be critical to ensuring long term security and stability in the Middle East.

To view this publication, please follow this link.

Paper

Sharing the UN Peacekeeping Burden: Lessons From Operational Partnerships

Only fifteen United Nations’ member states provide more than 60 percent of the 104,000 UN uniformed personnel deployed worldwide. How can a more equitable sharing of the global peacekeeping burden be produced that generates new capabilities for UN operations?

Operational partnerships are one potentially useful mechanism to further this agenda. They are partnerships that occur when military units from two or more countries combine to deploy as part of a peacekeeping operation. This report assesses the major benefits and challenges of these partnerships for UN peace operations at both the political and operational levels.

The report begins by providing an overview of the different varieties of partnerships in contemporary UN peace operations and describes the major patterns apparent in a new database of forty-one operational partnerships from 2004 to 2014. It presents case studies of two UN missions that exhibit the full range of operational partnerships: the UN Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) and the UN Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP). The authors explore why some UN member states engage in operational partnerships or might do so in the future, arguing that the reasons include a wide range of both mission-specific concerns and broader political and security-related reasons.

Paper

Plural Security: How Lebanon’s Divided Authority Seeks Order

The authors map and analyze what they call the ‘plural security’ landscape in Lebanon, which is characterized by the relatively limited role the Lebanese state plays in providing security and the web of arrangements between public and private security providers.

Full article: Plural Security: How Lebanon’s Divided Authority Seeks Order

Paper

The Battle at El Adde: The Kenya Defence Forces, al-Shabaab, and Unanswered Questions

Capture

In January 2016, Kenya suffered its largest ever military defeat at the battle of El Adde in the Gedo region of Somalia. Yet many of the questions surrounding this attack remain unanswered. On the six-month anniversary of the battle at El Adde, this report provides a preliminary analysis of the battle and some of the wider issues with respect to the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM).

This issue brief from the International Peace Institute (IPI) lays out a number of lessons the attack on El Adde can offer to the Kenya Defence Forces, AMISOM, and all peace operations engaged in various forms of stabilization and counterinsurgency.

To access the Battle at El Adde: The Kenya Defence Forces, al-Shabaab, and Unanswered Questions issue brief, kindly follow the link.

Paper

ICM Final Report – “Pulling Together: The Multilateral System and Its Future”

ICM

This is the final report of the Independent Commission on Multilateralism (ICM), an ambitious two-year project conducted by IPI. It identifies how the UN-based multilateral system can be made more “fit for purpose” for twenty-first century challenges.

In a highly consultative process, the ICM has involved more than 340 diplomats, UN officials, and civil society actors in retreats and meetings, and tens of thousands of people in person and online via public consultations.

The ICM’s final report suggests ten general principles to guide a revitalized multilateral system. It also makes concrete recommendations about how to address the specific challenges of our time across fifteen issue areas. This report will be followed by the release of fifteen issue-specific policy papers focused on each of these areas.

To access the ICM Final Report – “Pulling Together: The Multilateral System and Its Future” kindly follow the link.

Paper

Investing in Peace and the Prevention of Violence in West Africa and the Sahel-Sahara: Conversations on the Secretary-General’s Plan of Action

IPI

The International Peace Institute (IPI), the UN Office for West Africa and the Sahel (UNOWAS), and the Swiss Federal Department of Foreign Affairs co-organized a regional seminar in Dakar, Senegal, on June 27 and 28, 2016. This meeting brought together sixty participants from fourteen countries, including political leaders, members of civil society, and religious and traditional authorities, as well as representatives of the media, the private sector, governments, and regional and international organizations, to explore alternative measures to address the violent extremism affecting the region.

This paper outlines the recommendations agreed upon by the participants with regards to how the UN and its partners could more effectively prevent violent extremism in West Africa and the Sahel-Sahara subregions, in support of national governments and local authorities and communities and with the active participation of citizens. These recommendations include the need to focus on political participation, improved state-citizen relations, and inclusive dialogue as the primary mechanisms for prevention. They also agreed on the importance of local and regional preventive initiatives, and the need for institutional initiatives to prevent violent extremism to build on existing ones at the regional level, while recognizing the central role and responsibility of states in prevention.

To access Investing in Peace and the Prevention of Violence in West Africa and the Sahel-Sahara: Conversations on the Secretary-General’s Plan of Action study kindly follow the link.

Paper

Waging Peace: UN Peace Operations Confronting Terrorism and Violent Extremism

UNPeaceOperations_Terrorism_Extremism

Of the eleven countries most affected by terrorism globally, seven currently host UN peace operations. In countries affected by terrorism and violent extremism, peace operations will increasingly be called upon to adapt their approaches without compromising UN doctrine. But to date, there has been little exploration of the broader political and practical challenges, opportunities, and risks facing UN peace operations in complex security environments. This has created a gap between the policy debate in New York and the realities confronting UN staff on the ground.

This policy paper aims to bridge this gap by examining the recent drive to integrate counterterrorism (CT) and preventing and countering violent extremism (P/CVE) into relevant activities of UN peace operations, as well as the associated challenges and opportunities.

Read the full paper on Waging Peace: UN Peace Operations Confronting Terrorism and Violent Extremism

Paper

Applying the HIPPO Recommendations to Mali: Toward Strategic, Prioritized, and Sequenced Mandates

HIPPO

The past year has seen significant progress in Mali, with the signing of a peace agreement in June 2015 and the ensuing decrease in violence between the signatory parties. These achievements have allowed the UN to shift from prioritising cease-fire monitoring to focusing its efforts on the implementation of the peace agreement. In the wake of this shift in context, the mandate of the UN’s Multidimensional Integrated Stabilisation Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) is expected to be renewed in June 2016.

In light of the challenges faced by MINUSMA and the expected renewal of its mandate, the International Peace Institute (IPI), the Stimson Center, and Security Council Report co-organised a workshop on April 21, 2016, to give member states and UN actors the opportunity to develop a shared understanding of the situation faced by the UN in Mali. This workshop was the first in a series analysing how UN policies and the June 2015 recommendations of the High-Level Independent Panel on Peace Operations (HIPPO) can be applied to country-specific contexts.

For full access to the report on Applying the HIPPO Recommendations to Mali: Toward Strategic, Prioritized, and Sequenced Mandates, kindly follow the link.

Paper

Mali and the Sahel-Sahara: From Crisis Management to Sustainable Strategy

This issue brief analyzes the current crisis in Mali within the context of the Sahel-Sahara region as a whole. It discusses the roots of the crisis and details the various responses to date—including national, regional, and international actions—arguing that short-term crisis management will not be sufficient to bring peace and stability to the region.

For full access to Mali and the Sahel-Sahara: From Crisis Management to Sustainable Strategy, kindly follow the link.

Paper

Has UN Peacekeeping Become More Deadly? Analyzing Trends in UN Fatalities

How deadly is UN peacekeeping? Have UN peacekeeping fatalities increased over the past decades? Those who have attempted to answer these questions differ drastically in their assessments, in part due to the dearth of data and the variety of calculation methods employed. In order to fix some of these shortcomings and take a fresh look at these questions, this report analyzes trends in UN peacekeeping fatalities using a new dataset compiled by the UN Department of Peacekeeping Operations. As a result of the new data employed and methodological innovations, this report constitutes the most detailed study of UN fatality trends thus far.

To access the full paper Has UN Peacekeeping Become More Deadly? Analyzing Trends in UN Fatalities, kindly click on the link.

Paper

UN Support to Regional Peace Operations: Lessons from UNSOA

This report analyzes five sets of challenges that UNSOA faced from 2009 through to 2015. These challenges revolved around the expanding scope of UNSOA’s tasks, the clash between the UN and the AU’s organizational cultures, the highly insecure operating environment, the size of the theater of operations, and some of AMISOM’s idiosyncrasies. On the basis of these challenges, the report offers several lessons for future UN support for regional peace operations.

To access the full paper UN Support to Regional Peace Operations: Lessons from UNSOA, kindly click on the link.

Paper

ICM Policy Paper: Weapons of Mass Destruction

While the threat of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) may seem antiquated and unlikely to materialize, the mere existence of WMD remains one of the paramount threats to mankind. Nuclear weapons present not only the biggest existential threat, but also the biggest gap in the multilateral disarmament and non-proliferation architecture. In this context, on March 27, 2017, more than 100 countries launched the first UN talks on a global nuclear weapons ban.

This policy paper explores key challenges and developments in the field of non-proliferation and disarmament of WMD, with an emphasis on nuclear arms. Based on extensive consultations with representatives of states, various UN entities, and civil society, as well as subject-matter experts, this paper details recommendations laid out in the ICM’s final report, published in September 2016.

For full access to the ICM Policy Paper: Weapons of Mass Destruction, kindly follow the link. 

Paper

Logistics Partnerships in Peace Operations

Logistics support is both critical to the safety and health of peacekeepers and vital to success at every stage of a peace operation—especially in the high-threat environments where both UN and regional peace operations are increasingly deployed. Contemporary peace operations are based on logistics partnerships, with support provided by a range of actors including states, international organizations, and commercial contractors.

This report focuses on logistics partnerships that support UN operations and regional peace operations in Africa. Drawing on two UN missions and fifteen regional operations in Africa, it describes, compares, and traces the evolution of these two kinds of logistics partnerships and provides recommendations for improving them. 

For full access to Logistics Partnerships in Peace Operations, kindly follow the link.

Paper

A New Path Emerges for Troubled Somali Security

This article discusses Ethiopia’s recent military withdrawl from key areas in Somalia, and the speed at which al-Shabaab extremists filled the power vacuum, as a significant reminder of the limited progress made in building a credible Somali fighting force and again exposes the fragility of the country’s security architecture. 

For full access to A New Path Emerges for Troubled Somali Security, kindly follow the link.

Paper

A Process in Search of Peace: Lessons from the Inter-Malian Agreement

The 2015 Bamako Agreement was supposed to usher in a new era of peace and stability in Mali. However, not only has there been little progress in implementing the agreement, but the security situation remains volatile. This state of affairs is all the more troubling given the international community’s mobilization in support of the Malian state. Why, in spite of this mobilization, are some warning that the peace agreement is in danger of collapse?

For full access to A Process in Search of Peace: Lessons from the Inter-Malian Agreement, kindly follow the link. 

Paper

“Diaspora as Partners”: The Canadian Model of Countering Violent Extremism

The first step in an effective countering violent extremism (CVE) strategy is to develop a detailed and nuanced understanding of the relevant communities. Building on a research project completed for Public Safety Canada—which examined the impact of overseas conflicts on Syrian, Afghan, Somali, and Tamil communities in Canada— this paper identifies key insights about the country’s diaspora communities. Serious attempts to address violent extremism begin by accepting the reality that future attacks are as likely to come from within societies as abroad. Diaspora communities can be a country’s greatest asset in combating violent extremism. Strengthening the social capital of these communities is the most promising and cost-effective means to counter the threat of radicalization. This requires a serious commitment to research, dialogue, and law enforcement strategies that promote engagement instead of confrontation. 

To access “Diaspora as Partners”: The Canadian Model of Countering Violent Extremism, kindly follow the link. 

Paper

Made in Havana: How Colombia and the FARC Decided to End the War

On November 24, 2016, the government of Colombia and the biggest guerrilla group in the country, the Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia–Ejército del Pueblo (FARC-EP), signed a final peace agreement. This accord put an end to the longest armed conflict in the Western Hemisphere and to long and convoluted peace talks. What elements of the process contributed to its success? While it may be too early to properly speak of “lessons learned,” IPI’s latest paper highlights the key elements that seemed to have worked and those that made progress difficult.

For full access to Made in Havana: How Colombia and the FARC Decided to End the War, kindly follow the link.

Paper

How Can the UN Curb CAR’s Spiral of Violence and Ethnic Cleansing?

In August 2017, United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs Stephen O’Brien issued an alarming call to address early warning signs of genocide” in the Central African Republic (CAR). The nature and dynamics of the conflict affecting the country have dramatically evolved in the past few months, and recent episodes of violence have amounted, at a minimum, to ethnic cleansing. What seemed to be a contest between armed groups for economic and political gains has increasingly been entangled with renewed inter-communal, inter-ethnic, and inter-confessional hatred, especially in the central and eastern parts of the country. 

For full access to How Can the UN Curb CAR’s Spiral of Violence and Ethnic Cleansing?, kindly follow the link. 

Paper

Other Documents

Fragility the Main Hurdle to Implementing SDGs

After more than two years of debate and negotiations, the United Nations will approve the adoption of 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as the centerpiece of its post-2015 development agenda at a summit of world leaders September 25-27. The goals are much broader and more comprehensive than the Millennium Development Goals they replace, and cover a wide range of economic and political issues, including poverty, inequality, hunger, employment, education, the environment, and energy.

Full article available here

Other Document

IPI Salzburg Forum 2015: The Rule of Law and the Laws of War

One of the main threats to the current world order is the erosion of the rule-of-law based international system. Due to the advent of new technologies and hybrid warfare, the laws of war have also become blurred. A major cause of both of these trends is the emergence of armed non-state actors. This meeting note by the International Peace Institute (IPI) aims to explore this erosion of the rule of law and its impact on justice, peace, and security.

The note stems from a meeting that IPI organised on the theme “The Rule of Law and the Laws of War” from September 6 to 9, 2015 in Salzburg, Austria. The meeting brought together current and former foreign ministers, experts on international humanitarian law, diplomats, academics, journalists, and representatives from civil society. It was part of the IPI Salzburg Forum, a major annual event to address the risks and challenges of today and contribute to more effective multilateral governance in the future.

For the full report on the IPI Salzburg Forum 2015: The Rule of Law and the Laws of War, kindly follow the link.

Other Document

Applying the HIPPO Recommendations to Mali: Toward Strategic, Prioritized, and Sequenced Mandates

On April 21, 2016, the International Peace Institute (IPI) co-organized a workshop with the Stimson Center and Security Council Report to assess the challenges faced by the UN in Mali. This event is part of a series of workshops bringing together member states and UN actors to analyze how UN policies and the June 2015 recommendations of the High-Level Independent Panel on Peace Operations (HIPPO) can be applied to country-specific contexts.

This meeting note was drafted collaboratively by IPI, the Stimson Center, and Security Council Report.

To access the full Applying the HIPPO Recommendations to Mali: Toward Strategic, Prioritized, and Sequenced Mandates meeting note, kindly follow the link.

Other Document