Philipp Rotmann

Tools

Civil Affairs and Local Conflict Management in Peace Operations - Practical Challenges and Tools for the Field

The Civil Affairs and Local Conflict Management in Peace Operations; Practical Challenges and Tools for the Field toolkit is a result of the project “Peace Operations and Local Conflict Resolution: Lessons and Best Practices from the Grassroots,” conducted by the Global Public Policy Institute in Berlin with support from the Robert Bosch Foundation. It focuses on support to local conflict management. It lays out the practical challenges faced by civil affairs teams in South Sudan (UNMISS) and the DR Congo (MONUSCO) in their daily work on local conflicts that might be familiar to the civil affairs staff of other UN missions. In the dozens of conversations, roundtables and workshops with UNMISS and MONUSCO civil affairs staff conducted for this toolkit, the challenges and good practices identified are mostly related to the management and organization of work, although some do address key issues of support to conflict management itself. The challenges broached address a wide range of actors: some lie largely within the responsibility of civil affairs leaders, while some require the active collaboration of other mission while some require the active collaboration of other mission components or concern issues of working with UN and NGO partners, host country authorities or other local stakeholders.

For full access to the Civil Affairs and Local Conflict Management in Peace Operations; Practical Challenges and Tools for the Field toolkit, please kindly follow the link.

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Policy and Research Papers

Toward a Realistic and Responsible Idea of Stabilisation

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What is stabilisation, and why do we need a conceptual discussion? Based on interviews and policy documents from Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States, this article by Stability - The International Journal of Security and Development distils two conceptual visions of stabilisation, outlines a range of institutional and budgetary designs and offers a number of lessons of what a realistic and responsible idea of stabilisation might look like. Given the ubiquity of fragility and the lack of generalised knowledge about social engineering, this article argues in favour of a narrow understanding of stabilisation that seeks only to mitigate acute situations of crisis marked by extreme political volatility and violence. Even this more limited goal is ambitious enough to require sober assessment and communication of risk, continuing improvements to the conceptual and institutional tools for stabilisation and stronger commitment to constant reflection and learning.

For full access to the article Toward a Realistic and Responsible Idea of Stabilisation, kindly follow the link.

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