Policy and Research Papers

Ansaroul Islam: The Rise and Decline of a Militant Islamist Group in the Sahel

Ansaroul Islam has played an outsized role in the destabilization of northern Burkina Faso. From 2016 to 2018, just over half of militant Islamist violent events in Burkina Faso were attributed to Ansaroul Islam. The violence perpetrated by Ansaroul Islam has forced more than 100,000 to flee their homes and 352 schools to close in Soum alone. Yet by mid-2019, Ansaroul Islam was associated with only 16 violent events and 7 fatalities. This dramatic decline in the group’s activities warrants closer attention. It is particularly important to understand how this militant Islamist group first emerged and what factors have contributed to its diminished role in the first half of 2019.

To access the full note Ansaroul Islam: The Rise and Decline of a Militant Islamist Group in the Sahel, kindly follow the link. 

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Policy and Issue Brief: Engagement with Customary and Informal Justice Systems

In a bid to make justice accessible for all, IDLO has launched a series of Consultations on customary and informal justice systems. The global dialogue is informed by a series of publications titled “Navigating Complex Pathways to Justice: Engagement with Customary and Informal Justice Systems” that seeks to advance policy dialogue and distil lessons from programming and research, to help realize Sustainable Development Goal 16. This Policy and Issue Brief presents findings and policy recommendations for engaging with customary and informal justice systems, and providing information on features and challenges related to engagement.

For full access to the Policy and Issue Brief: Engagement with Customary and Informal Justice Systems, kindly follow the link.

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Strengthening the rule of law through education: a guide for policymakers

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, working in partnership, have developed this guide to assist policy-makers in developing policies and programmes that promote the rule of law through education. It contains guidance and examples of good practices on how the education sector, as a whole, can help young people become engaged and constructive citizens, making ethically responsible decisions in their daily lives and acting with empathy and respect for others.

For full access to the report Strengthening the rule of law through education: a guide for policymakers, kindly follow the link.

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Operationalizing Conflict Prevention – The Role of United Nations Police

UN Police have been an established instrument in the peace and security toolbox since their first deployment in the 1960s. In the course of the last 50 years, their role has increasingly been framed as preventive. In addition to peacekeeping operations, UN Police have become a regular feature of special political missions in the last decade or so. In the context of the recent peace and security architecture reform, the Secretary-General formally assigned UN Police the role of a system-wide service provider. In this new ZIF Policy Briefing, Dr. Annika Hansen lays out the range of deployment settings where UN Police can contribute to prevention and discusses their organizational, financial and political challenges.

For full access to the report Operationalizing Conflict Prevention – The Role of United Nations Police, kindly follow the link.

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The international security echo-chamber: getting civil society into the room

This paper states that there is a deadly paradox at the heart of international policy making: external interventions carried out in the name of security often end up undermining peace and security. The United States, European countries, the United Nations, and others are backing military, technical, financial, and diplomatic “security” initiatives all over the world, but their efforts often end up worsening and perpetuating the conflicts they are supposed to stop or prevent. All the while, the people worst affected have very little say about what’s going on around them.

For full access to the The international security echo-chamber: getting civil society into the room, kindly follow the link. 

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