Recharging Lake Chad Key to Ending the Conflict Between Nigeria’s Farmers and Herders

Forced southern migration from the Middle Belt in Nigeria is largely due to drought in the northeastern parts of the country. With Lake Chad dramatically decreasing in size, herders have had to search for alternative pastures and sources of water for their cattle. Subsequent encroachment on settlements and farmland have resulted in disputes over cattle theft and crop damage which have often turned violent, made worse by religious tensions. This mass migration south has also resulted in a vacuum in the north, with militant groups such as Boko Haram moving in to abandoned land. 

The Nigerian government have tried implementing a range of measures to slow and prevent this migration of farmers and so far they have placed a heavy emphasis on military responses. This article from IPI looks at the the progress made in relations to plans to replenish Lake Chad and the prospects of this successfully tackling the migration problem. 

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