Africa Center for Strategic Studies

The Africa Center for Strategic Studies supports United States foreign and security policies by strengthening the strategic capacity of African states to identify and resolve security challenges in ways that promote civil-military cooperation, respect for democratic values, and safeguard human rights. The Center is the pre-eminent Department of Defense institution for strategic security studies, research, and outreach in Africa. It engages African partner states and institutions through rigorous academic and outreach programs that build strategic capacity and foster long-term, collaborative relationships.

Telephone: +1 202 685-7300
Fax: +1 202 685-3210
300 5th Avenue, Building 62, Fort McNair
DC 20319-5066 Washington
No programmes have been added yet.
No support mandates have been added yet.
No vacancies have been added yet.

Videos

Governance Reforms May Be More Effective Than Military in Countering Boko Haram | Hussein Solomon

Nigeria's counterterrorism efforts have been unsuccessful because policymakers fail to acknowledge that elite corruption and the exclusionary character of the state are the underlying causes of the violence that has left more than 2,800 dead since 2009, Professor Hussein Solomon, Senior Professor in the Department of Political Science, University of the Free State, South Africa, said during a presentation at the Africa Center for Strategic Studies (ACSS) on March 28, 2013.

Video

David Kilcullen Discusses Counterinsurgency Lessons for Africa

In this video by Africa Center for Strategic Studies, David Kilcullen examines the growing focus of contemporary insurgencies on peri-urban areas, the aim of insurgents to isolate citizens from government services and security forces, and the frequent transformation of insurgencies to criminal trafficking networks focused on revenue generation. He also outlines the importance for the military to not only clear an area, but also to create conditions for a population to become self secure so that security can be maintained even without a permanent military presence.

For full access of the video David Kilcullen Discusses Counterinsurgency Lessons for Africa, kindly follow the link.

Video

Africa's Contemporary Security Trends

Joseph Siegle, Director of Research for the Africa Center for Strategic Studies, delivers an analysis and recommendations as regards the security situation in Africa and the main challenges in the years to come.  

For details and full access to the video Africa's Contemporary Security Trends, kindly follow the link.

Video

Africa is an Island: Maritime Safety & Security in Africa - Assis Malaquias

Dr. Assis Malaquias discusses maritime safety and security, piracy, illegal fishing, and more, before an interagency audience at a workshop on Africa's Contemporary Security Challenges hosted by the Africa Center for Strategic Studies in December 2015.

For details and full access to the video Africa is an Island: Maritime Safety & Security in Africa - Assis Malaquias, kindly follow the link.

Video

Prospects for peace in the DRC: A conversation with John Katunga

John Katunga, senior technical advisor for peacebuilding at Catholic Relief Services, discusses the status of the DRC's peace process and the role of external actors in the negotiations.

For details and full access to the video Prospects for peace in the DRC: A conversation with John Katunga, kindly follow the link.

Video

The National Security Strategy Formulation Process

In January 2017 the Africa Center for Strategic Studies held a week-long workshop on National Security Strategy Development for senior-level security professionals from across Africa. In this video, Thomas Staal provides insight from his experience in the aid sector and reminds that strategic thinking should not only be limited to military itself but also economic, diplomatic and social aspects of national security.

For details and full access to the video The National Security Strategy Formulation Process, kindly follow the link.

Video

Why Have a National Security Strategy?

In January 2017 the Africa Center for Strategic Studies held a week-long workshop on National Security Strategy Development for senior-level security professionals from across Africa. Assis Malaquias, Professor and academic chair of Defense, Economics and Resource Management at the ACSS explains the various rationales of having an NSS, the most important one being the will to break with the past resulting because of a change in the security environment of a country which in turn prompts the country to re-assess its multi-dimensional security threats.   

For details and full access to the video Why Have a National Security Strategy?, kindly follow the link.

Video

Relever les défis de la sécurité au Sahel

Le Sahel est une région diverse qui devient de plus en plus importante pour la sécurité régionale et mondiale. Par ailleurs, des dynamiques telles que la mauvaise gouvernance, un secteur agricole fragile, l'absence d'une transition démographique, et le manque d'emplois, en ont fait "une nouvelle frontière" pour les groupe djihadistes. En effet, ceux-ci essaient d'y manipuler et exploiter les tensions sous-jacentes de la région.

Serge Michaïlof résume les défis sécuritaires auxquels le Sahel fait face en particulier démographiques, d'extrémisme, de gouvernance et autres et explique ce qui devrait être fait pour y répondre de manière efficace.

Video

La stratégie de l'Union européenne au Sahel et le nexus «sécurité-développement »

"La sécurité du Sahel est aussi la sécurité de l'Europe" selon l'ambassadeur Angel Losada Fernandez, Représentant spécial de l'UE pour le Sahel. Dans un entretien avec le Centre d’études stratégiques de l'Afrique, l'ambassadeur Losada évoque la stratégie de l'UE au Sahel, selon le nexus sécurité-développement. Les quatre piliers de cette stratégie incluent la jeunesse, la lutte contre la radicalisation, les migrations et la lutte contre les trafics illicites. L'ambassadeur Losada est à ce poste depuis 2015. Par le passé, il a occupé plusieurs fonctions en tant que diplomate, notamment Représentant permanent de l'Espagne auprès de la Commission de la CEDEAO de 2006 à 2011.

Video

Rôle du Parlement en matière de sécurité nationale

Le Dr. Boubacar N'Diaye fournit une vue d'ensemble des performances de certains parlements d'Afrique dans le domaine du contrôle du secteur de la sécurité, tout en identifiant les bonnes pratiques en matière de contrôle parlementaire du secteur de la sécurité. Le Dr. N'Diaye propose aux parlementaires, décideurs et autres praticiens un certain nombre de solutions pour améliorer la qualité du contrôle parlementaire du secteur de la sécurité en Afrique.

Video

Africa's Evolving Security Landscape

Dr. Raymond Gilpin examines the underlying trends affecting security in Africa, including demography, climate, migration, urbanization, and how they affect issues ranging from resource competition to transnational crime to state-citizen relations. He suggests areas of opportunity for legislators, and offers a roadmap for effecting change.

Video

Policy and Research Papers

Regional Security Cooperation in the Maghreb and Sahel: Algeria’s Pivotal Ambivalence

The past year has seen a ratcheting up and convergence of security concerns in the Sahel and Maghreb with the growing potency of al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, the influx of mercenaries and weaponry from Libya, the expanding influence of narcotics traffickers, and Boko Haram's widening lethality. Nonetheless, regional cooperation to address these transnational threats remains fragmented.  In Regional Security Cooperation in the Maghreb and Sahel: Algeria's Pivotal Ambivalence , the latest Africa Security Brief from the Africa Center for Strategic Studies, Laurence Aïda Ammour examines the central role that Algeria plays in defining this cooperation and the complex domestic, regional, and international considerations that shape its decision-making... 

◆ Efforts to counter al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb’s (AQIM) growing influence in both the Maghreb and the Sahel are fragmented because of the inability of neighbors to forge collaborative partnerships.

◆ Algeria faces inverse incentives to combat AQIM outside of Algiers as it gains much of its geostrategic leverage by maintaining overstated perceptions of a serious terrorism threat.

◆ The Algerian government’s limited legitimacy, primarily derived from its ability to deliver stability, constrains a more comprehensive regional strategy.

The full paper can be downloaded from

http://africacenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/ASB18.pdf

Paper

Advancing Military Professionalism in Africa

In the latest ACSS Research Paper , "Advancing Military Professionalism in Africa," Colonel (ret.) Emile Ouédraogo explores the causes of the persistent challenges of professionalism facing many African militaries. Drawing on his experience as a parliamentarian, minister, scholar, peacekeeper, and soldier, Col. Ouédraogo highlights the political and economic disincentives to professionalism that have shaped many of Africa's armed forces. This has resulted in ambiguity over the mission, priorities, and oversight of African militaries. Perhaps most damaging has been the adversarial role that has developed between many African militaries and citizens.

Col. Ouédraogo argues that such outcomes are not inevitable. Some African militaries have demonstrated commendable levels of professionalism. Making this the standard, however, will require a sharp break with past practices. Greater investments in repurposing the military's mandate, depoliticizing the environment in which militaries operate, strengthening oversight mechanisms, and cultivating a deeper ethical foundation within military culture will all be needed. (Click here to access the paper.

ACSS Research Papers present policy-relevant analysis on topics of pressing importance to Africa's security. Previous ACSS research publications can be downloaded at: http://africacenter.org/acss-publications/.

French and Portuguese translations of this report will be sent to subscribers shortly and will be available on the Africa Center's website at: http://africacenter.org/

First-time readers can also sign up to ACSS distribution lists at: http://africacenter.org/subscribe/

Paper

The Anatomy of the Resource Curse: Predatory Investment in Africa’s Extractive Industries

In this latest ACSS Special Report, "The Anatomy of the Resource Curse: Predatory Investment in Africa's Extractive Industries," J.R. Mailey delves into the often murky linkages between senior government officials, unscrupulous natural resource investors, and the loopholes they exploit in the international financial system.

By tracing the actions of the Hong Kong-based Queensway Group, a major actor in Africa's extractive sector, through case studies on Angola, Guinea, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe, the report provides a detailed portrait of the mechanics that perpetuate the inequitable development, weak institutions, and instability so frequently observed in Africa's 20+ resource-rich countries.

Click hear to access the report

Paper

Après les élections: les défis de sécurité fondamentaux que le Nigéria doit relever

Dans sa série: "Après les élections: les défis de sécurité fondamentaux que le Nigéria doit relever", le Centre d'Études Stratégiques de l'Afrique (CESA) vient de publier une nouvelle section sur les défis en matière de gouvernance que rencontre le pays. 

Si elle ne constitue pas un sujet classique en matière de sécurité, la gouvernance est toutefois un aspect central des menaces souvent intérieures ou fondées sur des questions sociétales auxquelles le Nigéria est confronté. Des clivages ethnoreligieux à la montée de l’extrémisme au sein des communautés marginalisées, en passant par un manque de professionnalisme des forces armées, la mauvaise gouvernance est un thème courant dans pratiquement toutes les difficultés de sécurité du Nigéria. Dans de nombreux cas, ces difficultés sont en fait symptomatiques de processus gouvernementaux faibles, d’exclusion ou d’exploitation et, de ce fait, sont appelées à perdurer tant que les problèmes de gouvernance sous-jacents n’auront pas été résolus.

Vous pouvezu consulter l'intégralité de l'analyse ici

Vous trouverez aussi sept autres défis décrits par le CESA, intitulés: 

Paper

After the Election: Fundamental Security Challenges Nigeria Must Face

The political transition in Nigeria has generated a spirited dialogue on the priorities and course corrections required for Africa’s most populous nation. Key among these is security. While Nigeria’s struggle with the violent extremist organization, Boko Haram, has garnered most attention, the country faces a series of fundamental security challenges that, if left unaddressed, will trigger instability with long-term implications for Nigeria and the region. This Africa Center report reviews the most pressing of these challenges, how they have emerged, and actions needed to address these threats. - 

Download the report here.

Paper

Les migrations africaines financent les réseaux criminels et terroristes

Publiée par le Centre d'Études Stratégiques de l'Afrique (CESA) et disponible aussi en anglais, cette analyse s'intéresse à la croissance du phénomène migratoire en Mer Méditerranée et à l'exploitation é laquelle sont exposés les migrants aux mains de gangs criminels et de groupes extrémistes transnationaux. En outre, l'auteure présente une série de recommandations liées à la nécessité de stabiliser la Libye, à criminaliser le trafic des migrants (et non pas criminaliser les migrants eux-mêmes), et à améliorer l'information et l'aide aux migrants et aux communautés par lesquelles ils transitent.  

Lire l'article en ligne sur le site du CESA.

Paper

Maritime Security in the Gulf of Guinea

Drawing on the Africa Center’s decade of work on maritime security issues in Africa, ACSS, in consortium with interagency partners, has released the comprehensive, Gulf of Guinea Maritime Security and Criminal Justice Primer .

The waters surrounding the continent are vast depositories of natural resources. From fisheries to hydrocarbons, these resources generate valuable revenue to littoral African states. In addition, they are a source of food and employment for millions of Africans. The seas also serve to connect African countries to their neighbors and to the rest of the world. To realize the potential of this “blue economy,” African states must effectively deal with significant maritime security challenges including piracy, illegal fishing, illegal migration, arms trafficking, narco-trafficking, and marine pollution.

This publication on Maritime Security in the Gulf of Guinea therefore examines measures to strengthen sovereign control and collective security.

Paper

Governance, Accountability, and Security in Nigeria

Capture

As in much of Africa, the vast majority of security threats facing Nigeria are internal, often involving irregular forces such as insurgents, criminal gangs, and violent religious extremists. African Center for Strategic Studies' Oluwakemi Okenyodo argues that effectively combating such threats requires cooperation from local communities—cooperation limited by low levels of trust in security forces who often have reputations for corruption, heavy-handedness, and politicisation. Tackling modern security threats, then, is directly tied with improving the governance and oversight of the security sector, especially the police. Key paths forward include clarifying the structure of command and oversight, strengthening merit-based hiring and promotion processes, and better regulating private and voluntary security providers.

For full access to the brief on Governance, Accountability, and Security in Nigeria, kindly follow the link.

Paper

Islamist Extremism in East Africa

ACSS islamist extremism

This Africa Center for Strategic Studies security brief by Abdisaid M. Ali studies the growth of Salafist ideology in East Africa and the challenges it poses to long established norms of tolerance and interfaith cooperation in the region. The brief argues that this is the outcome of a combination of external and internal factors. On the one hand, the decade-long efforts to promote ultraconservative interpretations of Islam by different Gulf states have fostered more exclusive and polarizing religious relations in the region and resulted in an increase in violence. On the other hand, internal socioeconomic differences and repressive, heavy-handed measures by the police to fight extremism have likely reinforced the narratives and appeal of religious extremism. Redressing these challenges will require the rebuilding of tolerance and solidarity domestically along with a check on the external influence of extremist ideology.

To access the security brief on Islamist Extremism in East Africa, kindly follow the link.

Paper

Democracy and the Chain of Command: A New Governance of Africa’s Security Sector

Serious political crises in Niger, Honduras, Turkey, Bangladesh, Guinea, Madagascar, Thailand, and Mauritania in recent years illustrate the continuing influence of security forces on the political trajectories of countries around the world. Examples of such instability are particularly recurrent in Africa. When Africa’s political crises turn into coups, armed insurrections, or tragic confrontations, the defense and security forces (DSF) are invariably key players. For many years, such military actions were justified as an established right of state sovereignty over domestic issues. Often, they were even recognized as such on the international level.

Paper

Criminality in Africa’s Fishing Industry: A Threat to Human Security

Thousands of foreign fishing vessels ply African waters every year seeking to tap the continent’s rich fish stocks. Many of these vessels are believed to be exploiting Africa’s fisheries illegally. This is compounded by inadequate monitoring and surveillance efforts of the fishing sector by African governments and complicity between foreign fishing companies and the African ministries responsible for regulating fishing. Ultimately, these problems have consequences for human security.

For full access to Criminality in Africa’s Fishing Industry: A Threat to Human Security, kindly follow the link.

Paper

Leçons sur la prévention de génocides en Afrique depuis le génocide du Rwanda

Dans cette série de questions/réponses, Samantha Lakin, chercheuse, examine les leçons à retenir des 23 années écoulées depuis le génocide du Rwanda tandis que les atrocités de masse ne cessent de se répéter en Afrique. Ces leçons pourraient contribuer à éviter de futures atrocités, notamment par une inclusion accrue des acteurs du secteur de la sécurité.

Pour accéder à l'étude Leçons sur la prévention de génocides en Afrique depuis le génocide du Rwanda, veuillez suivre le lien.

Paper

Les institutions du secteur de la sécurité et la crise politique de la RDC

Cet article est le quatrième d’une série qui analyse les défis actuels auquel fait face le processus démocratique en République démocratique du Congo, et comment divers acteurs et institutions détermineront les aboutissements. Il fait notamment le bilan du secteur de la sécurité en RDC et du rôle qu’il pourrait jouer dans les espoirs d’une transition démocratique dans le pays.

Pour accéder à l'étude Les institutions du secteur de la sécurité et la crise politique de la RDC, veuillez suivre le lien.

Paper

Les transitions démocratiques tourmentées des mouvements de libération africains

La récente crise politique au Zimbabwe offre une perspective sur les défis que rencontrent de nombreux pays africains en opérant la transition des structures politiques de leur mouvement de libération fondateur vers d’authentiques démocraties participatives.

Afin d'accéder à l'analyse, Les transitions démocratiques tourmentées des mouvements de libération africains, veuillez suivre le lien.

Paper

When Peace Agreements Fail: Lessons from Lesotho, Burundi, and DRC

Many of the conflicts in Africa today are resumptions of earlier conflicts. These conflicts, therefore, reflect a breakdown, to some degree, of previously negotiated peace agreements. The article conducts a review of the experiences from three of these cases—Lesotho, Burundi, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo—offers lessons that can help inform future such accords.

For full access to the article When Peace Agreements Fail: Lessons from Lesotho, Burundi, and DRC, please kindly follow this link. 

Paper

Stopping the Spiral in Burundi

“The problem we are trying to resolve in Burundi is political and cannot be solved using military means. These [peacekeeping] troops will not solve the crisis but will create an enabling environment to continue the peace talks.”

The date is October 16, 2001, and the speaker is former South African President Nelson Mandela. As mediator of the Arusha peace talks on Burundi, he had just requested his successor, President Thabo Mbeki, to deploy South African forces to support the process. The Burundian government at the time, led by President Pierre Buyoya, was strongly opposed to such a force stating: “Burundians are not happy with this decision and will never accept it.” The idea of deploying a neutral force into Burundi had been mooted several years earlier by the former mediator, retired Tanzanian President Mwalimu Julius Nyerere who like Mandela, argued that: “Military intervention will not solve the problem but you cannot rule it out because killings and assassinations are going on and with the people absolutely frightened we cannot sit and let them continue.”

Despite the Burundian government’s resistance, Pretoria on October 30, 2001, deployed the South African Protection Service Detachment (SAPSD) to Burundi to protect exiles returning to negotiate the final stages of the peace talks. In 2003, as ceasefire talks gained momentum, the African Union, deployed the African Mission to Burundi (AMIB), mostly comprising South African, Ethiopian, and Mozambican troops to provide civilian protection, among other tasks. AMIB was later “rehatted” as the United Nations Mission to Burundi (ONUB), with South African Special Forces staying on as a separate African Union Specialist Task Force (AUSTF) until 2007. These deployments enabled the return of exiles to negotiate the final status talks, provided protection to civilians, created confidence for the return of refugees and assisted the implementation of transitional arrangements, including disarmament and military reform.

For accessing and reading the full article on Stopping the Spiral in Burundi, please kindly follow this link. 

Paper

Five Issues to Watch as Zimbabwe’s Transition Unfolds

With the resignation of President Robert Mugabe, Zimbabwe enters a new political era—setting a course without the only leader the country has known since independence in 1980. However, a change in leadership, especially one not ushered in through competitive elections, is not a guarantee that genuine reform is forthcoming. Such change will require substantive institutional reforms, a challenging task for a political system that has been dominated for so long by one political party.There are five strategic consideration suggested further in the article. 

For full access to the article Five Issues to Watch as Zimbabwe’s Transition Unfolds, please kindly follow the link. 

Paper

From Urban Fragility to Urban Stability

In this latest Africa Security Brief , Stephen Commins examines the causes of urban fragility and proposes ways that cities can adopt integrated urban development strategies to address these challenges. Experience from around the continent highlights the importance of collective efforts by local governments, police, justice institutions, the private sector, and youth to generate contextually-relevant policies that strengthen trust, social cohesion, economic opportunities, and security in Africa's cities.

In order to read the brief "From Urban Fragility to Urban Stability", please follow the link.

Paper

Priorities for Security and Justice during Liberia’s Transition

This article argues that the incoming administration of Liberian President-elect George Weah will need to address numerous pressing challenges related to the country’s security and stability. This is all the more critical as the United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL) is drawing down and plans to depart the country in March 2018, after 15 years in country.

For full access to the article, Priorities for Security and Justice During Liberia’s Transition, please kindly follow the link. 

Paper

La force conjointe du G5 Sahel prend de l’envergure

Le G5 Sahel a été créé en 2014 comme un partenariat intergouvernemental entre le Burkina Faso, le Tchad, le Mali, la Mauritanie et le Niger pour promouvoir la coopération économique et la sécurité dans la région du Sahel. La virulence croissante des groupes de militants islamistes, tirant parti de la faible densité de population des zones frontalières, a cependant posé un sérieux défi à la vision du G5.

En réponse, en 2017, le G5 Sahel a augmenté ses efforts de sécurité en lançant une force de sécurité commune pour lutter contre le terrorisme, le trafic de drogue et la traite des êtres humains. La force a été approuvée par la suite par le Conseil de paix et de sécurité de l’Union africaine et par le Conseil de sécurité des Nations Unies et a l’appui de divers partenaires internationaux. La force conjointe du G5 Sahel doit maintenant jouer un rôle de premier plan dans les futurs efforts de sécurité transnationale dans le Sahel. 

Afin d'accéder à l'analyse, La force conjointe du G5 Sahel prend de l’envergure, veuillez suivre le lien.

Paper

Priorities for Security and Justice during Liberia’s Transition

The incoming administration of Liberian President-elect George Weah will need to address numerous pressing challenges related to the country’s security and stability. This is all the more critical as the United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL) is drew down and departed the country in March 2018, after 15 years in country.

In order to read, Priorities for Security and Justice during Liberia's Transition, please follow the link.

Paper

Envisager un Soudan du Sud stable

Alors que la diplomatie régionale et internationale se concentre à juste titre sur la fin immédiate des hostilités, le Centre d’études stratégiques de l’Afrique a demandé à une sélection d’universitaires sud-soudanais et internationaux, de spécialistes de la sécurité et de leaders de la société civile de partager leurs visions sur les obstacles stratégiques que le pays doit surmonter pour accomplir une transition de son état actuel de dissimilation à une réalité plus stable.

Ces visions, prises individuellement et collectivement, ont pour but d’aider à définir certaines des priorités et conditions préalables pour transformer le paysage sécuritaire hautement fragmenté d’aujourd’hui au Soudan du Sud en un environnement où les citoyens sont en sécurité dans leur propre pays et protégés des menaces extérieures.

Afin d'accéder à l'analyse, Envisager un Soudan du Sud stable, veuillez suivre le lien.

Paper

Q&A: Somalia Charts Security Transition

Somalia’s state-building efforts, including initiatives to strengthen security and rebuild the political system, have proceeded steadily since the inauguration of President Mohammed Abdullahi Farmajo in February 2017. Nonetheless, serious challenges remain. The Africa Center for Strategic Studies spoke with Abdisaid Ali, National Security Advisor to the President of the Federal Government of Somalia, to take stock of the progress. 

In this interview, Abdisaid Ali presented Somalia's political will, security reforms in the country's Transition Plan, and the commitment to domestic and international coalition building to sustain the country’s progress.

To access to the full article, Q&A: Somalia Charts Security Transition, please follow the link.

Paper

Ituri devient la dernière poudrière du Congo

Des affrontements entre les jeunes Hema et Lendu dans la province de l’Ituri, au nord-est de la République Démocratique du Congo, ont éclaté en décembre 2017 et ont dégénérés en attaques au coup-pour-coup qui se sont rapidement propagées dans toute la province. Plus de 70 villages ont été détruits et environ 350 000 personnes ont cherché refuge en Ouganda voisin ou ont été déplacées à l’intérieur du pays. En juillet 2018, le Haut Commissariat des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés (HCR) a déclaré que ses équipes avaient reçu des informations faisant état de groupes armés commettant des massacres et rasant des villages entiers.

La crise politique en cours en RDC met à rude épreuve les accords de paix conclus après la deuxième guerre du Congo, ce qui pourrait mener à une situation encore plus instable.

Afin d'accéder à l'analyse, Ituri devient la dernière poudrière du Congo, veuillez suivre le lien.

Paper

Les difficiles leçons qu’AMISOM a dû apprendre en Somalie

En 2017, la Somalie a tenu des élections parlementaires et présidentielles dans une atmosphère relativement calme. La Mission de l’Union africaine en Somalie (AMISOM), qui est présente en Somalie depuis 2007, a joué un rôle primordial dans l’obtention de ce succès. Néanmoins, al Shabaab, le groupe militant islamiste qui avait déstabilisé la Somalie, demeure une menace sérieuse. Dans l’espoir d’obtenir une meilleure compréhension de l’état actuel de la mission, le Centre d’études stratégiques de l’Afrique s’est entretenu avec M. Simon Mulongo, le représentant spécial adjoint au Président du Conseil de la Commission en Somalie (D/SRCC) au sein de la Commission de l’Union africaine basée à Mogadishu.

Dans une interview avec le Centre d’études stratégiques de l’Afrique, Simon Mulongo, le représentant adjoint à la Commission de l’Union africaine à Mogadishu, a déclaré qu’AMISOM n’aurait pu obtenir le succès qu’elle a eu si elle avait continué à utiliser le modèle traditionnel du maintien de la paix.

Afin d'accéder à l'article, Les difficiles leçons qu’AMISOM a dû apprendre en Somalie, veuillez suivre le lien.

Paper

Le Cameroun, un pays profondément déstabilisé

Le Cameroun se trouve dans une situation difficile. L’élection présidentielle du 7 octobre, qui laissait déjà bon nombre de Camerounais indifférents en raison du peu de suspense sur son issue, est éclipsée par le conflit qui sévit dans les provinces du Nord-Ouest et du Sud-Ouest. La situation s’y est tellement dégradée que les nombreux autres défis auxquels le pays fait face semblent relégués au second plan.

Une réponse autoritaire à des manifestations pacifiques s'est transformée en un test pour l'identité camerounaise en tant qu'état multiculturel, et a placé le pays face au risque d'un conflit prolongé.

Afin d'accéder à l'article, Le Cameroun, un pays profondément déstabilisé, veuillez suivre le lien.

Paper

Contrôle parlementaire dans le secteur de la sécurité : L’expérience ougandaise

Dans un entretien avec le CESA, Stephen Twebaze, chercheur sur les Parlements africains et conseiller auprès de l’Assemblée législative ougandaise, explique que, lorsque les membres du Parlement se considèrent avant tout comme des représentants constituants plutôt que comme des cadres déployés par leurs partis politiques, les Parlements sont à même d’exercer un contrôle effectif, même s’ils sont subordonnés à un parti au pouvoir. Depuis 1986, M. Twebaze a recueilli, analysé et publié des indicateurs de performance sur le Parlement ougandais.

Pour accéder à l'analyse, Contrôle parlementaire dans le secteur de la sécurité : L’expérience ougandaise, veuillez suivre le lien.

Paper

Les manifestants au Togo continuent d’exiger l’application des limites de mandats

Depuis deux ans, des dizaines de milliers de citoyens togolais descendent dans la rue pour exiger des réformes gouvernementales. L’une de leurs principales revendications est de limiter le mandat présidentiel contraignant le président Faure Gnassingbé à quitter son poste en 2020, à la fin de son mandat actuel. La question est au centre d’un effort de Gnassingbé de faire adopter un amendement à la constitution pour lui permettre de se maintenir au pouvoir.

 Pour accéder à l'analyse, Les manifestants au Togo continuent d’exiger l’application des limites de mandats, veuillez suivre le lien.

Paper

Bilan de l’Accord revitalisé sur la résolution du conflit au Soudan du Sud

La signature de l’accord revitalisé sur la résolution du conflit au Soudan du Sud (R-ARCSS) par les rivaux de longue date Salva Kiir et Riek Machar à Khartoum en septembre 2018 a été saluée comme une percée décisive dans la résolution du conflit civil qui a coûté la vie à 400 000 victimes et a forcé le déplacement de plus de 4 millions de personnes depuis le début du conflit en décembre 2013. Cette analyse, qui s’articule autour des principaux éléments de l’accord, évalue l’évolution de la situation depuis la signature et les perspectives de mise en pratique pour l’avenir.

Pour accéder à l'article, Bilan de l’Accord revitalisé sur la résolution du conflit au Soudan du Sud, veuillez suivre le lien.

Paper

The Maghreb’s Fragile Edges

Nearly a decade after the Arab uprisings, tempers in the outlying regions of the Maghreb are on the boil. Scarred by a history of states’ neglect, with poverty rates often more than triple that of urban areas, these frontiers of discontent are being transformed into incubators of instability. Bitterness, rage, and frustration directed at governments perceived as riddled with abuses and corruption represent a combustible mix that was brewed decades ago, leading to the current hothouse of discord and tumult. Into the vacuum of credible state institutions and amid illicit cross-border flows of people and goods, including arms and drugs, militancy and jihadist recruitment are starting to take root, especially among restless youth. The center of gravity for this toxic cocktail is the Maghreb’s marginalized border areas—from Morocco’s restless northern Rif region to the farthest reaches of the troubled southern regions of Algeria and Tunisia. Governmental response has been parochial with an overemphasis on heavy-handed security approaches that often end up further polarizing communities and worsening youth disillusionment. At a time when governments are playing catch up against a continually shifting terror threat—and with the menace of returning Maghrebi fighters from Iraq, Syria, and Libya—the disconnect between the state and its marginalized regions threatens to pull these countries into a vicious cycle of violence and state repression. Breaking this spiral requires governments in the region to rethink their approach to their peripheral regions.

To have access to the full article, The Maghreb’s Fragile Edges, kindly follow the link.

Paper

Aperçu des réponses sécuritaires régionales au Sahel

L’augmentation des attaques des groupes terroristes au Sahel, couplée aux défis transfrontaliers tels que le trafic de drogues, le trafic d’êtres humains, les migrations et les déplacements de population, ont provoqué un ensemble de réponses sécuritaires tant régionales qu’internationales.

Pour accéder à l'intégralité de la publication, Aperçu des réponses sécuritaires régionales au Sahel, veuillez suivre le lien.

Paper

Les nombreux facteurs qui favorisent l’extrémisme violent dans le nord du Mozambique

Le mouvement islamiste armé dans la province de Cabo Delgado, dans l’extrême-nord du Mozambique est responsable de plus  de 100 morts, de destructions de biens et du déplacement de milliers de personnes. Le groupe exploite les vulnérabilités sociétales sous-jacentes d’iniquité, d’insécurité des droits fonciers et de méfiance envers les autorités.

Pour acceder  à l'intégralité de la publication, Les nombreux facteurs qui favorisent l’extrémisme violent dans le nord du Mozambique, veuillez cliquer sur le lien.

Paper

The Challenging Path to Reform in South Africa

Perceptions of disillusionment and growing polarization stand out in the wake of South Africa’s general elections. With just 66 percent of voters casting ballots in May’s elections, turnout was the lowest in South Africa’s democratic history. According to the author, despite voters’ repudiation of corrupt governance practices, the ANC remains divided in its commitment to reforms.

For full access to the paper, The Challenging Path to Reform in South Africa, kindly follow the link.

Paper

Assessing Attitudes of the Next Generation of African Security Sector Professionals

Africa’s armed forces are in transition from an independence-era model to one more suited to today’s conflicts and threats. They are increasingly called upon to engage in preventive action, resolve domestic security crises, combat transnational threats, and protect the progression toward more democratic governance. Understanding how African security sector actors’ perceptions may be shifting in light of these changes can provide insights to improving their effectiveness.

This study by Africa Center for Strategic Studies, involving 742 African security sector professionals from 37 countries, assesses differences in the attitudes, motivations, and values of the emerging generation of African security sector professionals. Understanding these differences may raise awareness, provide a basis for reform, and create an impetus for improving the citizen-security actor relationship.

For full access to the report, Assessing Attitudes of the Next Generation of African Security Sector Professionals kindly follow the link. 

Paper

Ansaroul Islam: The Rise and Decline of a Militant Islamist Group in the Sahel

Ansaroul Islam has played an outsized role in the destabilization of northern Burkina Faso. From 2016 to 2018, just over half of militant Islamist violent events in Burkina Faso were attributed to Ansaroul Islam. The violence perpetrated by Ansaroul Islam has forced more than 100,000 to flee their homes and 352 schools to close in Soum alone. Yet by mid-2019, Ansaroul Islam was associated with only 16 violent events and 7 fatalities. This dramatic decline in the group’s activities warrants closer attention. It is particularly important to understand how this militant Islamist group first emerged and what factors have contributed to its diminished role in the first half of 2019.

To access the full note Ansaroul Islam: The Rise and Decline of a Militant Islamist Group in the Sahel, kindly follow the link. 

Paper

Shifting Borders: Africa’s Displacement Crisis and Its Security Implications

Recent years have seen record numbers of Africans forcibly displaced from their homes. The most recent figure of 25 million people displaced is a 500-percent increase from 2005. This paper explores the drivers of population displacement in Africa, security ramifications, and priorities for reversing this destabilizing trend.

For full access to the report Shifting Borders: Africa’s Displacement Crisis and Its Security Implications, please follow the link. 

Paper

Shifting Borders: Africa’s Displacement Crisis and Its Security Implications

Recent years have seen record numbers of Africans forcibly displaced from their homes. The most recent figure of 25 million people displaced is a 500-percent increase from 2005. While much attention focuses on economic migrants who are trying to cross into Europe, 95 percent of those who are displaced remain on the continent. Two-thirds of these are displaced within their home countries. In short, the reality faced is more accurately characterized as an African displacement, rather than a European migrant, crisis.

This paper explores the drivers of population displacement in Africa, security ramifications, and priorities for reversing this destabilizing trend. For full access to Shifting Borders: Africa’s Displacement Crisis and Its Security Implications, please follow the link. 

Paper

Responding to the Rise in Violent Extremism in the Sahel

Violent activity involving militant Islamist groups in the Sahel—primarily the Macina Liberation Front, the Islamic State in the Greater Sahara, and Ansaroul Islam—has doubled every year since 2015. Employing asymmetric tactics and close coordination, these militant groups have amplified local grievances and intercommunal differences as a means of mobilizing recruitment and fostering antigovernment sentiments in marginalized communities. Given the complex social dimensions of this violence, Sahelian governments should make more concerted efforts to bolster solidarity with affected communities while asserting a more robust and mobile security presence in contested regions.

For full access to the report Responding to the Rise in Violent Extremism in the Sahel, please follow the link.

Paper

Other Documents

Un test pour la démocratie au Bénin

Les récentes élections législatives sans opposition au Bénin constituent une tentative de consolidation du pouvoir au détriment des acquis démocratiques. Le Bénin a longtemps été salué comme un « modèle de la démocratie » et ce jusqu’aux dernières élections législatives—puisque considérées comme une imposture par des observateurs indépendants—ont sérieusement ébranlé l’image que le pays s’était forgée au prix d’efforts considérables. Le 28 avril dernier, le Bénin a élu une nouvelle Assemblée nationale. Toutefois, en raison de nombreux obstacles de dernière minute placés par le gouvernement du président Talon, seuls les partis loyalistes ont pu présenter des candidats, aboutissant ainsi à l’élection d’une simple chambre d’enregistrement. L’opposition a boycotté les élections, entraînant un taux de participation très faible de 27 %. En réaction à des manifestations massives, l’armée a ouvert le feu sur des manifestants non armés, causant la mort d’au moins quatre civils.

Pour acceder  à l'intégralité de l'entretien, Un Test pour la démocratie au Bénin, veuillez cliquer sur le lien.

Other Document

Guinea at a Crossroads

After breaking away from decades of autocratic rule, Guinea’s democratic progress is now at risk as President Alpha Condé maneuvers to revise the constitution and stay in power for a third term.

For full access to the document Guinea at a Crossroads, please follow the link. 

Other Document

Le Burundi, la crise oubliée, brûle toujours

Si Nkurunziza a réussi à faire supprimer les reportages depuis l’extérieur sur le Burundi, la crise politique et humanitaire qui sévit dans le pays depuis 4 ans ne montre aucun signe d’apaisement.

Selon le rapport de septembre 2019 de la Commission d’enquête des Nations Unies sur le Burundi, des atrocités de masse et des crimes contre l’humanité commis principalement par des agents de l’État et leurs alliés continuent de se produire au Burundi. En outre, la Commission a constaté que le Président Pierre Nkurunziza et de nombreux membres de son entourage étaient personnellement responsables de certains des crimes les plus graves. Ceux-ci comprennent  « des exécutions sommaires, des arrestations et détentions arbitraires, des actes de torture et d’autres traitements cruels, inhumains ou dégradants, des violences sexuelles et des disparitions forcées. »

Pour accéder à la note Le Burundi, la crise oubliée, brûle toujours, veuillez suivre le lien.

Other Document

National Security Strategy Development - Burkina Faso Case Study

This paper presents and discuss the national security strategy in Burkina Faso. To access the full paper of National Security Strategy Development, kindly follow the link. 

Other Document