ASIA

ASIA

Policy and Research Papers

Promoting peace through the Sustainable Development Goals: What role for the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation?

Ahead of the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC) Summit in South Africa from 4-5 December 2015, Saferworld and the Southern African Liaison Office (SALO) have co-produced a briefing on the role of FOCAC in promoting peace through the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Although implementation of the 2030 Agenda and its SDGs will be driven primarily through action at national level, existing global partnerships and initiatives such as FOCAC will need to be leveraged in order to support national level action.

Key findings from the briefing include:

  • China and Africa’s shared commitment to promoting African peace and security and their acceptance of peace in the 2030 Agenda form a strong basis for cooperation.
  • Given the many overlaps between the existing Action Plan and the SDGs, the next FOCAC Action Plan could be used as a framework to guide China’s support for implementation of the 2030 Agenda.
  • China and Africa should use this Summit as an opportunity to promote a more holistic and preventative approach to promoting peace in Africa in the next Action Plan.

Paper available here: Promoting peace through the Sustainable Development Goals: What role for the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation?

Paper

Asian Perspectives on Civil-Military-Police Relations and Coordination in Disaster Management

The Asian Perspectives on Civil-Military-Police Relations and Coordination in Disaster Management  study explores the historical evolution of civil-military-police relations in Asia and the role that the military plays in Asian societies today in relation to disaster response. It focuses on how military and police actors mandated to respond in natural disasters interact with established response structures such as national/regional/local disaster management agencies along with the international humanitarian system. The study informs international disaster and crisis management stakeholders that are likely to participate in emergency response operations in Asia such as international non-government organisations, the United Nations, regional groupings like ASEAN, and donor governments.

Part 2 of the report serves as a stakeholder guide which provides practical insights into Asian perspectives on civil-military-police relations and coordination in disaster management. It assists contributing countries, such as the Australian Government, to understand better the contexts in which they may operate to assist Asian countries in natural disasters and in planning for such engagements.

This research explores the socio-political and civil-military-police relations context, and analyses the role that Asian militaries and the civilian humanitarian sector play in responding to disasters. The research contributes to informing and preparing donors and international stakeholders that are likely to provide assistance in the event of a disaster in the Asian region.

Full paper available: Asian Perspectives on Civil-Military-Police Relations and Coordination in Disaster Management

Paper

Dépenses militaires en Asie orientale : conflits territoriaux et risques de dérapage

Depuis 1997, la montée en puissance chinoise a amené le niveau des dépenses militaires en Asie orientale à un niveau record, et tous les pays de la région ont beaucoup investi dans leurs marines respectives. Dans un contexte marqué par les tensions politiques et les disputes territoriales, ces dépenses posent-elles un risque pour la stabilité régionale ? Cette note délimite certaines composantes clés d’une ruée généralisée vers le domaine maritime en Asie orientale, et en conclut que les disputes territoriales ne font pas qu’élargir les limites du dilemme de sécurité régional ; elles en restructurent les termes sur une base plus volatile que jamais.  

Document disponible ici: Dépenses militaires en Asie orientale : conflits territoriaux et risques de dérapage

Paper

Books

Reforming Justice - A Journey to Fairness

'Reforming Justice' calls for justice to be repositioned more centrally in evolving notions of equitable development. Justice is fundamental to human well being and essential to development. Over the past fifty years, however, overseas development assistance - foreign aid - has grappled with the challenge of improving 'the rule of law' with underwhelming and often dismal results around the world. Development agencies have supported legal and judicial reforms in order to improve economic growth and good governance, but are yet to address mounting concerns about equity and distribution. Building on new evidence from Asia, Livingston Armytage argues that it is now time to realign the approach to promote justice as fairness and equity.

Book