Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (NUPI)

With 50 years of experience, the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (NUPI) is Norway’s leading independent centre for research and information on international political and economic issues, and on areas of central relevance to Norwegian foreign policy. NUPI was established by the Norwegian Parliament in 1959. The institute is organised as a state body under the Ministry of Education and Research, but operates as an independent, non-political instance in all its professional activities.

Telephone: (47) 22 99 40 00
Fax: (47) 22 36 21 82
Email: info@nupi.no
C.J. Hambros plass 2D Pb 8159 Dep
0033 Oslo
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Policy and Research Papers

Norway’s Whole-of-Government Approach and its Engagement with Afghanistan

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Norway has been a prominent supporter of the UN’s Integrated Approach and has actively contributed to the development of NATO’s Comprehensive Approach. Norway’s own whole-of-government approach has, however, been limited to its engagement with Afghanistan. There is already a growing body of literature on the whole-ofgovernment approach. Surprisingly little has been written about Norway in this context. This report represents a first attempt at comprehensively explaining the Norwegian whole-of-government approach, as well as and analyzing its effectiveness to date.

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CIVCAP 2012: Laying Concrete Foundations

Even in the current context of financial constraints and challenging Member State dynamics at the UN, the next 12 months should be be seized as an important time for realizing pragmatic improvement in how the international community assists countries emerging from conflict. The Civilian Capacity (CIVCAP) initiative represents areal opportunity to drive concrete change on issues long recognized as deficient. CIVCAP is an important chance to depart from tired and often ineffective approaches to
providing technical support in fragile settings. There are practical steps policy-makers can take to support a strategic
shift in how peacebuilding and post-conflict assistance is provided.

Since March 2011, CIVCAP has remained a prominent agenda item at the United Nations. The key findings and main recommendations of the CIVCAP report were strongly supported by the UN Secretary-General and in May 2012 the CIVCAP process was officially recognized by the 193 Member States of the General Assembly. Since that time, the UN and partners have engaged in intensive policy consultations and have sought to identify solutions both in the field and for systemic challenges.

This policy brief presents developments in 2012 and it spotlights the CAPMATCH consultation with the Training and Rostering Community held in June 2012, which was supported by NUPI and co-hosted by the Permanent Missions of Indonesia and Canada to the United Nations. The coming General Assembly session will be important for maintaining momentum for the CIVCAP agenda.

This policy brief identifies three broad opportunities for policy makers to help deliver short-term results for CIVCAP and to set the stage for further reform:

  1. At the upcoming 67thGeneral Assembly session;
  2. In support of select field programmes; and
  3. In support of the CAPMATCH launch in mid-September 2012
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Coherence and Coordination in United Nations Peacebuilding and Integrated Missions - A Norwegian Perspective

This report analyses the coherence and coordination dilemma in peacebuilding systems, with special reference to the UN integrated missions concept. It argues that all peacebuilding agents are interdependent in that they cannot individually achieve the goal of the overall peacebuilding system. Pursuing coherence helps to manage the interdependencies that bind the peacebuilding system together, and coordination is the means through which individual peacebuilding agents can ensure that they are connected to the overall strategic framework process that binds the peacebuilding system together. The report is focussed on two areas where the lack of coherence holds the most promise for improving peacebuilding coherence. The first is the need to generate a clearly articulated overall peacebuilding strategy. The second is the need to operationalise the principle of local ownership. The report argues that without meaningfully addressing these shortcomings peacebuilding systems will
continue to suffer from poor rates of sustainability and success.

To view this publication, please follow this link.

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Strategic Options for the Future of African Peace Operations 2015-2025

Published by the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (NUPI), this paper advocates for a strategic review of African peace operations in the face of increasingly complex security environments. It formulates a number of key recommendations for the next ten years, including establishing regular discussions between strategic partners and the African Union, fostering inter-departmental coordination and the adoption of common objectives, improving investment in the planning and management of missions, and reinforcing the role of civilians in mission planning.

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The Kosovo Protection Corps. A Critical Study of its De-activation as a Transition

This paper has been written from a practitioner’s perspective. The author spent 6 months embedded with the Kosovo Protection Corps (KPC) command team, spending hours in their company during its de-activation. Whether visiting KPC headquarters across the country; sitting in meetings at the highest echelons of Government; or accompanying the Commander and Deputy Commander to the Kosovo Force (KFOR) HQ in Pristina, the author had unprecedented access and exposure at the heart of the organisation.

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Local Drivers of Violent Extremism in Central Mali

This policy brief examines the processes of violent extremist mobilisation and radicalisation in Mopti, Central Mali. Specifically, it looks at the strategies employed by one of the most salient radical jihadist groups in the region, the Katiba Macina.

For full access to the report Local Drivers of Violent Extremism in Central Mali, please follow the link.

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