National Institute for Defense Studies, Japan (NIDS)

The National Institute for Defense Studies (NIDS) is the Ministry of Defense’s core policy research arm, conducting research and studies with a policy orientation primarily on security and military history, while also serving as a strategic college-level educational institution for the training of high-level officers of the Self-Defense Forces.

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Policy and Research Papers

Alliances and Conflict Resolution: NATO’s Role in Security Sector Reform

In the post-9/11 world, the United States (U.S.) has had to cope with “long wars” in Iraq and Afghanistan. What is common between the cases of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts is that even after major combat operations ended, the military presence of multinational forces has not been scaled down as planned. In Afghanistan, the size of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) has been expanding. As post-conflict stabilization operations have not made smooth progress as anticipated, allies and coalition partners have to accelerate reform of the security sector including armed forces and police. With current realities of Afghanistan and Iraq flatly contradicting the prewar optimism  entertained by the Bush Administration, Western powers will have to stay engaged in postwar peacebuilding for some time.

In the post-9/11 world, the United States (U.S.) has had to cope with “long wars” in Iraq and Afghanistan. What is common between the cases of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts is that even after major combat operations ended, the military presence of multinational forces has not been scaled down as planned. In Afghanistan, the size of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) has been expanding. As post-conflict stabilization operations have not made smooth progress as anticipated, allies and coalition partners have to accelerate reform of the security sector including armed forces and police. With current realities of Afghanistan and Iraq flatly contradicting the prewar optimism  entertained by the Bush Administration, Western powers will have to stay engaged in postwar peacebuilding for some time.

Access full paper at http://www.nids.go.jp/english/publication/kiyo/pdf/2009/bulletin_e2009_5.pdf

Paper