Saferworld

Saferworld is an independent non-governmental organisation that works to prevent and reduce violent conflict and promote cooperative approaches to security.

The organisation works with governments, international organisations and civil society to encourage and support effective policies and practices through advocacy, research and policy development and through supporting the actions of others.

Established in 1989, they work in Africa, Asia and Europe. Staff are based in offices in London and Nairobi, and in all the regions in which the organisation operates.

Saferworld receives funding from a range of donors including governments, the European Commission, trusts and individuals. Find out more about funders on the funding page and how you can support them.

Vision

Saferworld believes that everyone should be able to lead peaceful fulfilling lives, free from insecurity and violent conflict.

Mission

Saferworld contributes to the achievement of this vision by fulfilling their organisational mission:

Saferworld works to prevent and reduce violent conflict and promote cooperative approaches to security. It works with governments, international organisations and civil society to encourage and support effective policies and practices through advocacy, research and policy development and through supporting the actions of others.

Values

  • Saferworld is an independent organisation that strives for accountability, transparency and integrity.
  • Saferworld brings about long-term sustainable change by bringing together and working with international, national and local partners.
  • Saferworld strives to be a diverse organisation working inclusively and respecting the views of others.

For more visit www.saferworld.org.uk

Telephone: +44 (0) 20 7324 4646
Fax: +44 (0) 20 7324 4647
Email: communications@saferworld.org.uk
The Grayston Centre, 28 Charles Square
N1 6HT London
No programmes have been added yet.
No support mandates have been added yet.

Senior Conflict and Security Adviser

Location: London, UK
Application Deadline: 23/10/2019 12:00

The post-holder will support internal reform processes aimed at improving the effectiveness of agencies operating in conflict-affected contexts.  The person we are looking for will have knowledge of conflict sensitivity methodologies and approaches, experience of implementing successful capacity building programmes and of working effectively in at least two regional contexts in Africa, Asia, the Middle East or the Americas. 

For full details about the position Senior Conflict and Security Adviser, please follow the link.

Vacancy

Regional Conflict and Security Adviser Central Asia

Location: Bishkek or Dushanbe,
Application Deadline: 01/09/2019 23:59

Saferworld are looking for a Regional Conflict and Security Adviser in Central Asia. The candidate will support the Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan country programmes, teams and partners, particularly on strategic analysis and research, policy development and advocacy. The post-holder will help identify and design new strategic areas in programming, advise on the conflict and gender- sensitive implementation of projects and facilitate cross-regional information sharing. S/he will have experience in Central Asia contexts, analysing data and excellent relationship building and communication skills. 

For more information about the vacancy as Regional Conflict and Security Adviser Central Asia, kindly follow the link. 

Vacancy

Project Manager

Location: Aden, Yemen
Application Deadline: 14/08/2019 12:00

Saferworld is currently seeking an experienced professional to join their Middle East and North Africa team for the role of Projector Manager. The post-holder will be responsible for the successful delivery of the Enhancing Mechanisms for Peacebuilding in Yemen project and will work with communities, national civil society and government stakeholders.

For full details about the vacancy Project Manager, please follow the link.

Vacancy

Analysis and Outreach Manager

Application Deadline: 30/06/2019 23:59

You will provide support and lead on different thematic issues relevant to conflict sensitivity in South Sudan whilst collaborating with the CSRF team on side research and analysis projects. The person we are looking for will have substantial experience with demonstrated analytical skills and the ability to work in teams.

For full access to the vacancy, Analysis and Outreach Manager, kindly follow the link.

Vacancy

Conflict Sensitivity Resource Facility (CSRF) Director

Application Deadline: 05/05/2019 23:55

The Director will manage the operations of the CSRF with a focus on:

  • Strategic leadership and direction
  • Programme, operational and staff management
  • Financial and budget management
  • Representation and beneficiary relationships
  • Safety, security and risk management
  • Cross-consortium and multi-donor relations

For more information and for application details on the position Conflict Sensitivity Resource Facility (CSRF) Director, kindly follow the link.

Vacancy

Better aid learning adviser

Period: 25/02/2019 to Indefinite
Application Deadline: 25/02/2019 00:00

The better aid learning adviser role has been created to lead on the Conflict Sensitivity Research Facility's (CSRF) approach to an expanded learning agenda for donors and aid organisations working in South Sudan.  The post-holder will work closely with the team and CSRF consortium to link the learning agenda with other elements of programming, including research, analysis, outreach and capacity-building.

To learn more about the position, better aid learning adviser, and to apply, please follow the link provided. 

Vacancy

Conflict and Security Adviser

Location: London, UK
Application Deadline: 09/10/2018 23:55

The post-holder will work in the Conflict Advisory Unit which provides high-quality advisory support to influential external actors, whilst working with programmes and other teams to capture and promote learning and best practice in adopting conflict-sensitive approaches.

Summary of key areas of responsibility:

1. Provide high-quality and timely technical support to humanitarian and development agencies, multi-lateral organisations, local civil society and corporate actors on conflict sensitivity

2. Design and conduct field research and develop policy recommendations

3. Strategic planning and development of new and innovative policy agendas

4. Work with Saferworld country teams to develop and implement integrated strategies

5. Develop and maintain strategic partnerships and coalitions

6. Organisational learning, monitoring and evaluation

7. Fundraising proposal development and donor relations

To learn more about the position Conflict and Security Advisor, please follow the link.

Vacancy

Security and Justice Adviser

Location: London, UK
Application Deadline: 28/08/2018 23:59

This Security and Justice Adviser will work on Saferworld’s organisational objective on security and justice, which is framed as: “Strengthen people’s security and access to justice through the development and effective delivery of responsive, accountable and locally-appropriate security and justice” (Strategic Objective 1). In particular, the post holder will focus on non-state security and justice provision as part of a bigger – and gender-sensitive – security and justice approach.

The Adviser will have the following areas of responsibility:

  • Research, policy development and advocacy
  • Technical support and capacity-building
  • Organisational learning and strategy development
  • Management and fundraising

For further information about the position, Security and Justice Adviser, please follow the link. 

Vacancy

Security and Justice Adviser

Location: London, UK
Application Deadline: 28/08/2018 15:00

This Security and Justice Adviser will work on Saferworld’s organisational objective on security and justice, which is framed as: “Strengthen people’s security and access to justice through the development and effective delivery of responsive, accountable and locally-appropriate security and justice” (Strategic Objective 1). In particular, the post holder will focus on non-state security and justice provision as part of a bigger – and gender-sensitive – security and justice approach.

The Adviser will have the following areas of responsibility:

  • Research, policy development and advocacy
  • Technical support and capacity-building
  • Organisational learning and strategy development
  • Management and fundraising

For further information about the position, Security and Justice Adviser, please follow the link. 

Vacancy

Pakistan Country Manager

Location: Islamabad, Pakistan
Application Deadline: 28/05/2018 23:59

The Country Manager will be responsible for further developing Saferworld’s Pakistan country strategy and programme, overseeing the implementation of current and future activities and developing and managing relationships with local partners and with international and national actors in country.

The post-holder will also be responsible for overall team management and security, managing and monitoring programme delivery against objectives, managing and monitoring programme expenditure, fundraising and advocacy, and networking with and reporting to donors. Finally, the post holder will contribute to organisation-wide processes and discussions to advance Saferworld's thematic priorities, methodological approaches and organisational development.

For further information about the position Pakistan Country Manager, please kindly follow the link. 

Vacancy

Pakistan Policy Adviser

Location: Pakistan
Period: 29/01/2018 to Indefinite
Application Deadline: 28/01/2018 12:00

Saferworld is seeking a Policy Adviser to provide support and advice on programme design and implementation to ensure the meaningful inclusion of women, marginalised groups and others whose voices are often unheard, whist being sensitive to underlying drivers of conflict or instability.

To view this vacancy, please follow the link. 

Vacancy

Videos

Cattle Raiding and Small Arms Control in South Sudan

Cattle-raiding has a long history in South Sudan, but the vast supply of small arms in civilian hands has led to the raids becoming more violent in recent years. In remote areas the South Sudan Police Service lacks the capacity to protect communities and so many cattle herders keep arms to defend themselves. In this video, Saferworld sets out the problem of small arms proliferation in South Sudan and how we are working with the government and local partners to encourage dynamic and strategic solutions to prevent violent cattle raiding.

Video

Police in Kyrgyzstan: Perspectives and Experiences

Police in rural communities in Kyrgyzstan tackle a range of issues – from domestic violence, substance abuse and forced early marriage to addressing recruitment of young people into violent groups. Saferworld's documentary shares their thoughts, perspectives and experiences on working with the communities they are there to protect

Video

Policy and Research Papers

The jirga: justice and conflict transformation

This report looks at the Jirga , a traditional gathering of elders that resolves grievances by consensus, and the role it can play in conflict transformation and resolution in the Provincially Administered Tribal Areas (PATA) of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, one of the most conflict-affected areas in Pakistan.

The report, by Saferworld and Community Appraisal and Motivation Programme (CAMP), presents local perspectives on the Jirga system, the challenges it brings and areas for improvement. The research findings are drawn from consultations with local communities in Swat and Lower Dir districts as well as a range of Pakistani and international actors who have experience of the Jirga system.

The report found that as a conflict transformation and resolution tool, the Jirga could help prevent militant groups from advocating alternative forms of justice, which in the past has led to violence. The report also identified that the system could be improved by including marginalised and vulnerable groups in a manner and timeframe that is acceptable to local people. It concludes that a more representative and inclusive Jirga system would improve access to justice for all members of society and reduce local tensions and conflicts in PATA. Furthermore it recommends that Pakistan should strengthen the links between formal and informal mechanisms for justice and clarify the status and potential of Jirga to complement the judicial system.

This research is part of the EU-funded ‘People’s Peacemaking Perspectives’ project, a joint initiative implemented by Conciliation Resources and Saferworld and financed under the European Commission's Instrument for Stability. The project provides European Union institutions with analysis and recommendations based on the opinions and experiences of local people in a range of countries and regions affected by fragility and violent conflict.

Find out more about the People's Peacemaking Perspectives project

Read the policy brief

Read the full report

Paper

Tracking key conflict and security dynamics in Karamoja - an update

This report focuses on Karamoja in north-eastern Uganda. The region has long experienced serious conflict and insecurity, severe poverty and low levels of development. Communities have been involved in cycles of cattle raiding and counter-raiding, including with border communities in Kenya and South Sudan.

The report finds that the government’s assessment of improved security and successful disarmament in Karamoja does not seem to reflect the continued insecurity felt by communities and the fact that significant numbers of illegal weapons still remain in civilian hands. The report recommends that joint planning, and building trust with communities, is essential for a successful transition from the Uganda People’s Defence Force-led to police-led civilian disarmament. Furthermore, while trust in the police generally remains high, their limited presence in the region means that they often fail to effectively protect communities. Equipping and training the police will be crucial to ensure they can better serve communities throughout Karamoja.

Building on an in-depth conflict and security assessment from 2010, the report incorporates follow-up research carried out in the districts of Moroto and Napak in 2011-12. It is primarily a qualitative study, taking in the views and experiences of a range of actors including local people, security and law enforcement agencies, government officials and aid agencies. It emphasizes that local perceptions of safety and security need to guide decisions regarding civilian disarmament, security and development.

The research is part of the EU-funded ‘People’s Peacemaking Perspectives’ project, a joint initiative implemented by Conciliation Resources and Saferworld and financed under the European Commission's Instrument for Stability. The project provides European Union institutions with analysis and recommendations based on the opinions and experiences of local people in a range of countries and regions affected by fragility and violent conflict.

Read the briefing

Read the full report

Find out more about the People's Peacemaking Perspectives Project

Paper

Public protest and visions for change

Understanding how young men and women in Yemen, who make up 75 percent of the population, perceive the drivers of Yemen’s current crisis and possible solutions needs to be an integral part of finding a lasting settlement and achieving sustainable peace.

 Yemen’s civil protest movement is the largest in Yemeni history and the longest-running of the Arab Spring uprisings. Young protestors across the country have come together, giving unprecedented hope to millions of Yemenis. Building on consultations with young men and women from diverse backgrounds in four major cities in Yemen, Public protest and visions for change Yemen offers a detailed snapshot of the main grievances driving the protests, youth ideas on transition and some of the innovative solutions and surprisingly positive conclusions they are drawing. Yemeni youth are not just voicing a set of grievances; many have begun to articulate visions for a more inclusive political system. Their perspectives are supplemented by interviews with politicians, religious and tribal authorities, businessmen, youth and women leaders, and experts on Yemen.

The report is part of Saferworld’s EU-funded ‘People’s Peacemaking Perspectives’ project, a joint initiative implemented by Conciliation Resources and Saferworld and financed under the European Commission's Instrument for Stability. The project provides European Union institutions with analysis and recommendations based on the opinions and experiences of local people in a range of countries and regions affected by fragility and violent conflict.

Read the full report

Read the policy brief

Find out more about People's Peacemaking Perspectives

Paper

Improving the Understanding and Use of Participatory Approaches in EU Security-Building Programmes (2010).pdf

Over the past decade or so, the EU has gradually adopted the concept of ‘human security’ in its support for security and justice programming. A commitment to human security implies that security and justice strategies and programmes should proactively seek to take into account and address citizens’ needs and concerns, as primary recipients of security and justice provision. One way to ensure these requirements are met is to promote public participation in the design, implementation and monitoring of security and justice mechanisms.
The EU has a number of policies, tools and frameworks which commit its institutions to taking a ‘participatory approach’ to programming, including in the areas of security and justice. These commitments are gradually, if unevenly, being translated into practice. However, research by the Initiative for Peacebuilding (IfP) Security Cluster has identified a number of institutional, cultural and operational challenges which hinder the understanding and use of participatory approaches by EU institutions. This paper gives an overview of the challenges faced by EU actors in understanding and using participatory approaches and suggests steps that EU institutions can take to overcome them.

Paper

Justice should be blind, but is the international community’s support to informal justice mechanisms in Nepal given blindly?

Support for justice provision, both formal and informal, constitutes a significant element of donor assistance in Nepal. An initial shift towards supporting informal justice mechanisms (IJMs) began during the decade-long violent conflict between the state and the Maoists that continued until the signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) in 2006. Donors have since renewed support for the reform and trengthening of the formal justice sector, but have continued to support IJMs. In particular, they have supported ‘new’ IJMs such as paralegal and community mediation committees. These systems today make up one layer of an increasingly complex matrix of formal and informal justice mechanisms, which include both traditional and other non-donor supported IJMs.
This paper builds on questions raised by earlier Saferworld research into IJMs, conducted between November 2009 and April 2010. This research revealed a complex and seemingly disjointed patchwork of donor-supported IJM projects, most of which were operating at a fairly small scale and without clear links either to formal or to other informal justice mechanisms. The research raised a number of challenging questions, including how and why donors first began supporting new IJMs, whether and how these new systems contribute to the strengthening of a broader system of justice in Nepal and to what extent their creation has supported ongoing peacebuilding efforts across the country.

Paper

North Caucasus: Views from within

The research project The North Caucasus: views from within focuses on issues of social difference, such as ethnicity, religion, generational difference and migration, and the challenges arising from these. It considers local perspectives on these challenges; how people seek to address them; and what they consider needs to be done to resolve them. It involved the collaboration of international and Russian experts, including researchers from the North Caucasus, and institutional partnership between the Institute of Oriental Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Saferworld. The work focused on five republics in the North Caucasus: Chechnya, Ingushetia, North Ossetia, Dagestan, and Kabardino-Balkaria.

Our research shows that social and political conditions for people on the ground – particularly for youth, who feel excluded from both economic and political life – do little to defend society against the influence of ideological extremism. More engagement with the problems affecting young people, and improved governance, including in the security and justice sectors, can help build resilience to violence.

The English version of the report is titled, The North Caucasus: views from within People’s Perspectives on Peace and Security . In addition to the main report, five case studies from the individual republics will shortly be uploaded to the Saferworld website.

The Russian version is titled The North Caucasus: views from within - Challenges and problems for social and political development . The five republic case studies are included within the report.

The research forms part of the EU-funded ‘People’s Peacemaking Perspectives’ project, a joint initiative implemented by Conciliation Resources and Saferworld and financed under the European Commission's Instrument for Stability. The project provides European Union institutions with analysis and recommendations based on the opinions and experiences of local people in a range of countries and regions affected by fragility and violent conflict.

Read the report

Read the policy brief

Find out more about the People's Peacemaking Perspectives project

Paper

Monitoring and Evaluation Arrangements for the Justice Law and Order Sector in Uganda: A Case Study

This case study report presents research findings on the monitoring and evaluation (M&E) arrangements of a long-running justice sector development programme in Uganda (hereafter JLOS – Justice Law and Order Sector). It is one of five case studies carried out as part of the Saferworld project, 'Evaluating for Security: Developing specific guidance on monitoring and evaluating Security Sector Reform interventions’.1 Together with a wider desk review and supplementary research into the broader M&E systems used by the major SSR donors, the case studies provide an evidence base from which specific guidance on monitoring and evaluating SSR can be developed.

Paper

Evaluating for Security and Justice - Challenges and Opportunities for Improved Monitoring and Evaluation of Security System Reform Programmes

This report brings together the results of a research project on the monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of security system reform (SSR) programmes. It focuses particularly on donor-supported SSR programmes, but with reference throughout to local ownership of and capacity for M&E activities. The report seeks to answer four questions about the M&E of SSR:

  • Specific challenges of the M&E of SSR: What challenges apply to the M&E of SSR and security and justice institutions and what, if anything, is distinct about this area?
  • Content and process: What should we be measuring when monitoring and evaluating SSR and how?
  • Available resources: What existing resources can be drawn upon from within the field or from related disciplines to assist in developing specific guidance on M&E of SSR?
  • Demand: Who are the most obvious users of tailored guidance on this subject and what do they need?

The report does not in itself constitute a guidance document on the M&E of SSR, but provides material from which tailored guidance could be prepared to meet the needs of interested parties.

Paper

Monitoring and Evaluation Arrangements for the Law and Justice Sector in Papua New Guinea: A Case Study

This report assesses the monitoring and evaluation (M&E) arrangements for the AusAIDsupported Law and Justice Sector in Papua New Guinea (PNG). It covers both Government of PNG and AusAID mechanisms: examining their content, development and convergence over time. AusAID’s Law and Justice Sector Program (LJSP) has been running since 2004, with an initial design phase one year prior to that. The LJSP presents a unique case study involving the support of only one donor (AusAID) to a sector programme that is led with an increasing level of ownership by the recipient government.

Paper

Monitoring and Evaluation Arrangements for the Support to Security Sector Reform Programme in Albania: A Case Study

This report assesses the monitoring and evaluation (M&E) arrangements for the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) project entitled ‘Support to the Security Sector Reform (SSSR) programme in Albania’. Research for this project was carried out in Tirana in May 2008. It is one of five case studies carried out as part of the Saferworld project, 'Evaluating for Security: Developing specific guidance on monitoring and evaluating Security Sector Reform interventions’.

Together with a wider desk review and supplementary research into the broader M&E systems used by the major SSR donors, the case studies provide an evidence base from which specific guidance on monitoring and evaluating SSR can be developed.

Paper

Monitoring and Evaluation Arrangements for the Implementation of Community Policing in Bosnia and Herzegovina

This report analyses the monitoring and evaluation arrangements (M&E) of a community policing project ‘Implementation of Community Policing in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH)'. The field research for this report was carried out in May/June 2008.

This report is one of five case studies carried out as part of the Saferworld project ‘Evaluating for Security: Developing specific guidelines on monitoring and evaluating Security Sector Reform (SSR) interventions'

Paper

Monitoring and evaluation arrangements for the Sierra Leone Security Sector Reform Programme

This report assesses the monitoring and evaluation (M&E) arrangements put in place by the UK Government's Sierra Leone Security Sector Reform Programme, which ran from June 1999 until 31 March 2008. The research for this report was carried out between May and July 2008.

It is one of five case studies carried out as part of the Saferworld project, 'Evaluating for Security: Developing specific guidance on monitoring and evaluating Security Sector Reform interventions'.

Paper

Survey of Key Donors and Multilateral Organisations on Monitoring and Evaluation of Security Sector Reform: United Kingdom Case Study

This report provides an overview of the United Kingdom Government’s arrangements for monitoring and evaluating (M&E) the support it provides to security sector reform (SSR). It examines the M&E systems that already exist for similar types of work as well as looking at any specific treatment given to SSR, before also identifying outstanding needs, challenges and any trends and opportunities that exist for improving M&E in this area.

Paper

Reflections on the Northern Ireland Experience

The origins of the most recent sustained period of conflict in Northern Ireland can be traced back to the civil rights movement that emerged in 1968, the coercive response by the Unionist government and communities, and subsequent armed Republican campaign against the British government and security forces. What followed was over 30 years of sectarian violence, terrorism, counter-terrorism and the separation of communities. The signing of the Belfast/Good Friday Agreement in 1998 was not a conclusion to the conflict nor a resolution of the issues that had been the catalyst for the violence and disorder. Instead, the Agreement provided a framework for the transformation of the conflict through a peaceful political process and the reform of policing and justice institutions in Northern Ireland.

In 2013, Saferworld and Intercomm facilitated roundtable discussions with community development and interface workers from both Loyalist and Republican backgrounds; police officers from an operational and strategic background; academics and members of civil society to reflect on progress, challenges and lessons with regard to community policing, the policing of public disorder, and the management of transition in Northern Ireland.

The resulting paper, Reflections on the Northern Ireland experience: the lessons underpinning the normalisation of policing and security in a divided society , highlights issues of leadership, trust, partnership and accountability as key to progress and offers insight and valuable lessons drawn from the Northern Ireland experience that resonate with other contexts emerging from violent conflict.

Paper

Community-Based Approaches to Safety and Security - Lessons from Kosovo, Nepal and Bangladesh

This report identifies lessons relevant for donors and implementing agencies seeking to support community-based approaches to security. It is based on Saferworld and partners’ community security work in Kosovo, Nepal and Bangladesh in 2010–13.

The report suggests that community security programmes produce measurable improvements to communities’ own experiences of safety and security. It also identifies a range of results relevant to the provision of capable, accountable and responsive security provision and wider peacebuilding and statebuilding efforts.

The findings argue for the critical role of civil society in security and justice sector development and point to some of the measures necessary to support such groups effectively. The report reinforces the observation that successful security and justice interventions need to integrate both community-based and institutionally led reforms. Finally, it provides some practical lessons for donors and agencies seeking to support community-based approaches to safety and security through their work.

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Media reporting on peace, conflict and security issues

A free and impartial media should be one of the pillars of a stable society. Media organisations have direct communication with a considerable portion of the population and are in a powerful position to support peace and security-related efforts. In a country like Kosovo, with a violent past, the media needs to pay special attention when covering emotionally charged issues, as failure to do so threatens to heighten tensions.

This study, ‘Media reporting on peace, conflict and security issues: How objective and conflict-sensitive is media coverage and reporting on these issues?’, examines the existing legal framework governing media and the perceptions of citizens on whether media outlets are sensitive or partisan in their reporting. Amongst other things, these perceptions are key in shaping people’s opinions and perceptions of Kosovar institutions. Currently, there are two regulatory bodies for press and broadcast media, but nothing for online media.

In recent months the Pristina-Belgrade dialogue has been prioritised in the media, and though the reporting is generally perceived to be impartial, there is a potential for inciting conflict if there is ambiguity and a perceived lack of objective reporting, particularly the use of conflict-insensitive language. This report concludes with suggestions for how media outlets could work towards more conflict sensitive news coverage.

This report was the result of joint work and collaboration between 11 organisations, including members of the Forum for Security in Pristina and Conflict Prevention Forum in the north, and through community dialogue meetings and desk research facilitated by FIQ and AKTIV.

This paper is available in English, Albanian and Serbian on the Saferworld website.

Paper

Putting people at the heart of security: Reviewing approaches, exploring solutions

Saferworld organised a roundtable in Brussels titled 'Putting people at the heart of security: reviewing approaches, exploring solutions'.

Victoria Walker, ISSAT's Deputy Head and Senior SSR Advisor on Governance attended this meeting which brought together experts from EU institutions and Member States, international organisations, think tanks and civil society to share experiences and lessons about security sector reform and the extent to which such processes have been able to improve human security. The meeting was also an opportunity to explore innovative approaches to enhancing people's security, including community security.

This event was part of a wider process to catalyse an informed discussion at the EU level on how community security can help support the realisation of peacebuilding and statebuilding objectives. As part of this, we encourage you to get in touch if you would like to find out more or share your comments and thoughts.

Read report here

Paper

Building constructive China-US cooperation on peace and security in Africa

Increasingly, external actors are involving themselves in Africa – engagement which is critical to African development, but which has potential either to increase security or further destabilise some of the continent’s already fragile countries. A cooperative rather than competitive approach between two key external actors, the US and China – based on common interests – would greatly enhance the conditions for peace and sustainable development in Africa, as well as providing each with direct benefits.

This briefing looks at obstacles to collaboration between China and the US, opportunities for cooperation, and provides recommendations to both on how the interests of African nations and these key actors can best be served, including:

  • Accept a broadened definition of security and focus on non-traditional security challenges and non-combat operations that offer opportunity without the connotation of military-military support or intervention
  • Prioritize African perspectives
  • Deepen mutual understanding and promotion of knowledge exchange in conflict-sensitive development and the management of conflict, crises, and risk in business sector involvement.

Find more information and download the full brief here.

Paper

Community Security: Experiences from Bangladesh

Summary of this briefing on Community Security in Bangladesh published by Saferworld:

As in many developing countries, Bangladesh’s security architecture continues to conform to conventional practices that prioritise state security through institution-building above all. While delivering some sense of security, this approach means authorities tend to be more reactive to security needs, rather than being proactive and taking preventative actions.

Additionally, the security situation in Bangladesh is becoming more precarious, with political polarisation increasing the threat of violence and creating space for growing extremist ideologies and the associated cycles of violence that are typical of attempts to express or supress those ideologies.

Building peace and preventing violence across Bangladesh requires a participatory approach, with full support from and cooperation of local communities, and complemented by able and empowered civil society organisations. This process must begin by rebuilding trust between authorities and communities. Community Security: Experiences from Bangladesh  outlines how to do this through a collaborative approach called ‘community security’, which brings people together to identify security challenges and plan how to address them collectively. The briefing draws on lessons learned and best practices from Saferworld and BRAC’s mid-term community security programme review, which covers June 2012–June 2014 – the midway point of our four-year programme. It also sets out recommendations for how policymakers in Bangladesh can contribute to lasting peace and security.

You can download the full brief in English here.

Paper

From agreement to action: Building peaceful, just and inclusive societies through the 2030 Agenda

Recent increases in violent conflict are putting longer-term advances in global peace at risk, driving humanitarian crises, mass displacement and chronic underdevelopment. Various tools already exist for the international community to respond to these interlinked challenges. However, with peace at the heart of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, there is now a universally agreed vision to prevent conflict, address its root causes, and make peace sustainable in every country.

This short briefing highlights what Saferworld sees as some of the key targets for peace. It also outlines key steps – to be made by a range of actors – towards national implementation and demonstrates how collective action at the global level can help enable this. - Thomas Wheeler,Anna Moller-Loswick, Sunil Suri, Larry Attree

Paper

Promoting peace through the Sustainable Development Goals: What role for the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation?

Ahead of the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC) Summit in South Africa from 4-5 December 2015, Saferworld and the Southern African Liaison Office (SALO) have co-produced a briefing on the role of FOCAC in promoting peace through the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Although implementation of the 2030 Agenda and its SDGs will be driven primarily through action at national level, existing global partnerships and initiatives such as FOCAC will need to be leveraged in order to support national level action.

Key findings from the briefing include:

  • China and Africa’s shared commitment to promoting African peace and security and their acceptance of peace in the 2030 Agenda form a strong basis for cooperation.
  • Given the many overlaps between the existing Action Plan and the SDGs, the next FOCAC Action Plan could be used as a framework to guide China’s support for implementation of the 2030 Agenda.
  • China and Africa should use this Summit as an opportunity to promote a more holistic and preventative approach to promoting peace in Africa in the next Action Plan.

Paper available here: Promoting peace through the Sustainable Development Goals: What role for the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation?

Paper

A new war on terror or a new search for peace? Learning the lessons of Afghanistan, Somalia and Yemen

The West cannot afford to ignore the lessons of the past 15 years – and needs a strategy that leads to peace. This brief draws on new Saferworld reports analysing Western counter-terror, stabilisation and statebuilding efforts in Afghanistan, Somalia and Yemen since 2001. The track record of these efforts is poor, but lessons from them could be the basis for more effective and constructive strategies to achieve peace in the face of terror and instability.

To access the document, please kindly follow the link: A new war on terror or a new search for peace? Learning the lessons of Afghanistan, Somalia and Yemen

Paper

Transitional policing in South Sudan’s peace agreement: Joint Integrated Police

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The formation of a new Joint Integrated Police (JIP) unit – mandated by South Sudan’s August 2015 peace agreement – is now well under way. The unit, which is charged with providing security in some of the most fragile locations in the country, has a potential role to play in enhancing stability. However, challenges related to training, vetting and deployment mean that not only does the JIP risk failing to deliver on its policing mandate but it also risks actively contributing to conflict dynamics. This briefing outlines some of the potential difficulties associated with the JIP and some of the challenges the unit is likely to face in delivering security for communities. It is intended to inform those planning to support the JIP and the security sector reform process in South Sudan going forward.

To access the full Transitional policing in South Sudan’s peace agreement: Joint Integrated Police briefing, kindly follow the link.

Paper

Myanmar’s Plural Justice System

Understanding justice provision in Myanmar requires grappling with the universe of providers that people use to resolve disputes. There is no single justice provider with recognised authority to enforce the rule of law throughout Myanmar. Long-running political conflicts and plural power structures mean providers and systems are distinct in some places and overlap in others. This briefing maps the different justice chains people follow, providing an ‘end-user’ perspective on how they navigate justice providers.

For full access to the report Myanmar’s Plural Justice System, kindly follow the link.

Paper

Debt Disputes in Myanmar

People in Myanmar face a wide range of justice problems, from land disputes to drug trafficking to violence against women. Yet in MyJustice research, debt disputes emerged as the most common dispute people spoke of, affecting large numbers of people in both Mon State and Yangon Region (Denney et al., 2016). Yet debt disputes have been largely overlooked to date. They highlight the importance and challenge of equitable access to credit in a transitioning country like Myanmar, without which there are both justice and developmental consequences. As with most justice problems, debt disputes and a lack of formal credit access affect the poor and vulnerable most acutely.

For full access to the report Debt Disputes in Myanmar, kindly follow the link.

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Justice mechanisms and conflict dynamics in Nepal: Local perceptions and impacts

Saferworld_justice mechanisms

As an ethnically and geographically diverse nation, people in Nepal rely on a wide range of formal and informal justice systems to resolve their disputes. Informal justice mechanisms – in their varying forms – often pre-date formal mechanisms by hundreds of years and remain the preferred method of dispute resolution for the majority of Nepalis. This is largely due to their accessibility within communities and propensity for promoting and maintaining social harmony. Another reason is the formal justice vacuum that emerged in the wake of the decade-long armed conflict, which ended in 2006 and led many communities to turn to or rely further on informal justice actors.

While efforts have been made by the government to improve access to the formal justice system, including outreach programmes and an increase in resources to provide free legal support and make fees more affordable, implementation has been poor. Consequently, issues of capacity and accountability remain and are compounded by the persistent challenges of accessibility for remote, poorer or marginalised communities and individuals.

As part of a wider Saferworld project – ‘Community Initiatives for Common Understanding’ (CICU), which aims to foster mutual understanding among groups in conflict to seek common solutions – a research project was carried out to map justice provision in the five CICU districts in Nepal.

This report by Saferworld presents the findings of the research project, which explores community-level perceptions of formal and informal justice mechanisms, the current situation of access to justice among different community/ethnic groups, and the linkage between access to justice issues and local conflict dynamics.

For full access to the report on Justice mechanisms and conflict dynamics in Nepal: Local perceptions and impacts, kindly follow the link.

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Helping Police to be Gender-Sensitive in Pakistan

Women in Pakistan face a range of discriminatory and harmful practices that can threaten their security. In order to move towards gender equality, changes must be made across the criminal justice system, including to the structure, institutional culture and behaviour of the police. Increasing female police officers in stations, on its own, will not lead to greater gender sensitivity. It should also be complemented by addressing the inherent societal gender norms that reinforce male power within the police system. Saferworld has been working with police in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) province on a gender-responsive policing project to ensure that they are better able to respond to crimes against women.

For full access to Helping Police to be Gender-Sensitive in Pakistan, kindly follow the link. 

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Women’s Role in Peace and Security in Yemen

This literature review was commissioned as part of research for the project ‘Enhancing women’s role in peace and security in Yemen’.  The research is being led by the Center for Applied Research in Partnership with the Orient (CARPO) and the Yemen Polling Center (YPC) in partnership with Saferworld, and will inform programme activities to support women’s peacebuilding efforts in Yemen by Saferworld in cooperation with the National Foundation for Development and Humanitarian Response (NFDHR) and Wogood for Human Security. The review intends to provide an overview of women’s interactions with peacebuilding efforts in Yemen, in view to informing current strategies on how to enhance their role. 

For full access to Women’s Role in Peace and Security in Yemen, kindly follow the link. 

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Addressing pastoralist conflict in Ethiopia

South Omo in Ethiopia, is a diverse zone in terms of people and natural resources. It comprises large populations of pastoralists and agro-pastoralists and a diverse landscape. The climate is erratic with frequent droughts and rivers that periodically flood and dry out completely. Economic opportunities are limited in an environment of poor infrastructure, no or few opportunities for trade and in some cases, poor terms of trade. As the livelihoods of pastoralists and agro-pastoralists depend on key resources such as land, water, forests, minerals, wildlife, livestock and pasture, the environment poses particular challenges to their survival. These resources are diminishing from year to year, intensifying competition over resources and causing violent conflict between the ethnic groups in the case study areas of the Kuraz and Hamer districts of South Omo. Communities involved in the study were able to identify many mechanisms for resolving conflict, including intermarriage, economic diversification, trade and good governance. The challenge is to identify these mechanisms and to involve a wide range of actors, including government officials at all levels (eg federal, regional, district), local communities and traditional leaders, international actors and donor agencies, in developing comprehensive strategies for conflict prevention and resolution. Recommendations for addressing these issues more effectively are provided at the end of the report. 

For full access to Addressing pastoralist conflict in Ethiopia, kindly follow the link. 

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Karamoja conflict and security assessment

The Karamoja region of north eastern Uganda is one of the most marginalised parts of the country. For decades, it has suffered from high levels of conflict and insecurity, alongside low levels of development. Pastoralism is a way of life and cattle-raiding is a common practice in the region. Some of the most visible and well-documented violence in Karamoja occurs between different ethnic groups during cattle raiding. The effects of such violence include death, injury, displacement and disruption of economic and social activities. Tensions are fuelled by the vast amounts of small arms that have saturated the region in recent years. Recent disarmament attempts by the Ugandan army seem to have aggravated existing insecurity and there have also been reports of relief efforts fuelling conflict between communities. 

For full access to the report Karamoja conflict and security assessment, kindly follow the link. 

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Building Inclusive Peace: Gender at the Heart of Conflict Analysis

Saferworld's 2016 Gender analysis of conflict toolkit is designed to help peacebuilders integrate gender into conflict analysis, understand how gender influences conflict dynamics, and provide a foundation for designing gender-sensitive peacebuilding programmes.

This policy brief shows how the toolkit can be used in different ways by integrating gender into participatory conflict analysis and research. It shares analysis and findings, combining the expertise of community-based organisations, women’s rights groups, and international and peacebuilding organisations on gender norms and conflict.

For full access to Building Inclusive Peace: Gender at the Heart of Conflict Analysis, please follow the link.

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Counter-terror in Tunisia: a road paved with good intentions?

From the outside, Tunisia is perceived both as the sole success of the Arab uprisings and as a key battleground in the internationally-backed ‘war on terror’. It is a space crowded with international actors and civil society organisations (CSOs). While most arrived following the 2011 uprisings to support its transition to democracy, today many are concerned with addressing ‘terrorism’ or ‘violent extremism’. Drawing on the first-hand accounts of local and international CSOs, Tunisian officials, foreign diplomats, and people living in Medenine, Sidi Bouzid and Sidi Hassine, Saferworld’s latest in-depth looks at threats to peace in Tunisia and how they are being handled.  

For full access to Counter-terror in Tunisia: a road paved with good intentions?, please follow the link. 

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Building a peaceful, just and inclusive Somaliland: SDG16+ priorities for action

Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 16+ unites efforts to create more peaceful, just and inclusive societies around the world. In our latest briefing, Saferworld, the Somaliland Non-State Actors Forum (SONSAF), and civil society outline SDG16+ priorities for action in Somaliland. Working with authorities and civil society organisations from all six regions of Somaliland, Saferworld and SONSAF, held a series of consultations between August 2017 and February 2018 to determine short- and long-term priorities for SDG16+.

This briefing explores why SDG16+ is relevant for Somaliland and sets out those civil society priorities for action. Priority areas include increasing women’s political participation, ending female genital mutilation, and improving access to justice.

For full access to the paper, Building a peaceful, just and inclusive Somaliland: SDG16+ priorities for action, kindly follow the link.

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United Nations Peace Operations in Complex Environments: Charting the Right Course

Under financial and political pressure from United Nations (UN) member states, UN peace operations are taking on more responsibility to support counter-terrorism and countering/preventing violent extremism (C/PVE). Despite the UN’s robust policies and principles, its growing counter-terror cooperation with host governments risks damaging its credibility and impartiality, and harming prospects for peace.

UN peace operations are already being asked to take a more proactive military stance against ‘terrorists’, support non-UN counter-terror forces with funding, intelligence and logistics, to side with abusive states, and to integrate C/PVE objectives into their work. This risks alienating communities, compromising their impartiality, and aggravating conflict dynamics.

This report argues that member states and UN leadership should work to safeguard UN impartiality, bolster non-military capacities to address conflict and monitor human rights, keep from labeling conflict parties as ‘terrorists’ or ‘violent extremists’, and redefine its relationship with counter-terror operations to ensure it is never complicit in grave violations of human rights and humanitarian law.

For full access to the report, "United Nations Peace Operations in Complex Environments: Charting the Right Course", please follow the link. 

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Security Integration in Conflict-affected Societies: Considerations for Myanmar

Myanmar's peace process has brought to the fore critical debates about the future of the country’s security sector and the establishment of a federal system of government. This paper, draws on the experiences of countries in Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas to offer technical and political insights for Myanmar.

In the second in Saferworld's security integration in Myanmar series, this report examines three themes:

  • sustaining security sector negotiations and making them more inclusive;
  • the institutional features of security sectors in federal countries;
  • and the integration of non-state armed groups with national security bodies.

The paper aims to support reflection and promote discussion on how to develop a more inclusive security sector in Myanmar – one that will meet the needs of the country’s diverse ethnic and religious communities and help consolidate long-term peace and stability. It provides insights that can hopefully be drawn upon by those both inside and outside the Myanmar peace process to influence and inform the security integration debate and to make it more inclusive.

For full access to the paper, Security Integration in Conflict-affected Societies: Considerations for Myanmar, please follow the link. 

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Delivering on the Promise of Peace? Devolution, Inclusion and Local Conflicts in Kenya

Kenya has long suffered from identity-based politics that discriminate by ethnicity, contributing to divisions in communities and election violence. Devolution was meant to reduce this discrimination – but has it delivered on the promise of greater inclusion, accountability and peace?

To help answer this question, this report explores how devolution is affecting inclusion and conflict dynamics in Isiolo County, Kenya.The research reveals some encouraging signs of devolution, but also finds that devolution has brought its own profound challenges that undermine inclusive governance and threaten peace – including ethnic divisions and exclusion, gender inequality, corruption and weak accountability.

For full access to the report, Delivering on the Promise of Peace? Devolution, Inclusion and Local Conflicts in Kenya, please follow the link. 

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Community Security Handbook

The main purpose of this handbook is to explain the principles underpinning Community Security interventions, and suggest practical approaches to implementing them, drawing on the work of Saferworld and a select number of other agencies. It is aimed at practitioners–particularly programme managers–and aims to help them work through the steps involved in planning, implementing, evaluating and improving Community Security interventions. It sets out the objectives of Saferworld’s Community Security work, explains why we see it as important, and draws together a significant body of learning and experience.

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Exploring the Links Between Experiences of Injustice and Violent Conflict

Experiences of injustice increase the risk of driving violent behaviours. Therefore focussing on understanding and addressing people’s experiences of injustice, as opposed to merely its dispensation, could have a significant bearing on peace and conflict. Furthermore, thinking of injustice as a multi-stakeholder problem to be solved opens up a vast array of policy and programming options to tailor work on peace and justice issues to each context. 

For full access to the policy brief, Exploring the Links Between Experiences of Injustice and Violent Conflict, please follow the link. 

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Justice for Peace in South Sudan: Civil Society Perspectives

Without clear and effective justice mechanisms, many communities in South Sudan face cycles of violence linked to cattle raiding, revenge, and gender-based violence.

When left unaddressed or mishandled through traditional systems, or when delayed in statutory courts, such cases can lead to violent conflict.

Saferworld's latest briefing presents civil society perspectives and recommendations for more effective and accountable justice in South Sudan.

To read the full report, Justice for Peace in South Sudan: Civil Society Perspectives, please follow the link provided.

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Security, justice and governance in south east Myanmar: a knowledge, attitudes and practices survey in Karen ceasefire areas

Saferworld and the Karen Peace Support Network present unprecedented insights into people's perceptions of security, justice and governance in south east Myanmar.

In 2017 and 2018, Saferworld and the Karen Peace Support Network spoke to over 2,000 people across 72 villages across south east Myanmar about their experiences during the 69-year-old armed conflict between the Myanmar Armed Forces (Tatmadaw) and the Karen National Union.

They found that people in Myanmar’s Karen ceasefire areas face severe insecurity amid protracted armed conflict, routine violence, abuse and exploitation. Eighty per cent of households stated experiences of violence or abuse by the authorities, such as shootings and burning of villages. The survey also found relatively high levels of legitimacy of the KNU controlled areas, low levels of trust in the peace process, and fairly high levels of anxiety that fighting will break out again.

Their survey constitutes a unique evidence base to support more conflict-sensitive humanitarian and developmental assistance. It is intended to support efforts to address the root causes of conflict and insecurity.

To access the full paper, Security, justice and governance in south east Myanmar: a knowledge, attitudes and practices survey in Karen ceasefire areas, kindly follow the link. 

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Justice provision in south east Myanmar: experiences from conflict-affected areas with multiple governing authorities

Myanmar’s south east has long been characterised by conflict between the central government and various ethnic armed organisations (EAOs), including the Karen National Union (KNU). The resulting patchwork of governance structures – including those of the government, the KNU, or a mix of the two – has meant that people access justice services in very different ways.

This report, explores how justice is provided and accessed in four locations under different governance arrangements, and shows how this varies from place to place. The locations included in the research include an urban ward under government control, a village fully administered by the KNU, a village officially administered by the government but which is influenced by two EAOs, the Democratic Karen Benevolent Army and the KNU, and a militia group, and a village under mixed KNU and government administration.

The findings are meant to inform international aid agencies with a detailed account of how people perceive and experience justice in their communities, and how these systems function in practice. It should also help inform policy and practice around justice in south east Myanmar.

To read the full report Justice provision in south east Myanmar: experiences from conflict-affected areas with multiple governing authorities, please follow the link provided.

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Enhancing accountability for peaceful, just and inclusive societies: Practical guidance for civil society reporting on SDG16+

Since 2015, Saferworld has worked with civil society and governments to translate the 2030 Agenda commitments to peaceful, just and inclusive societies into action.

For the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to be achieved, governments and other stakeholders must be accountable for the commitments agreed in 2015. Reporting by civil society on national progress towards the SDGs is critical for ensuring accountability, and provides an important complement to official accounts of progress.

This briefing provides practical guidance for civil society organisations to develop independent reports on progress towards the goal of peaceful, just and inclusive societies, referred to as SDG16+. The guidance is in two parts: the first outlines a series of steps for developing a report, and the second proposes a structure for the report’s content.

Follow the link to access the practical guidance for Enhancing accountability for peaceful, just and inclusive societies.

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A threat inflated? The countering and preventing violent extremism agenda in Kyrgyzstan

Often overshadowed by regional headline-grabbing hotspots like Afghanistan, Pakistan and Iran, Central Asian countries like Kyrgyzstan rarely get international attention. The post-Soviet country – once on the ancient Silk Road – rarely makes the news now, but it has its share of challenges. Bisected by the ’northern route’ of opioid traffickers, it struggles with pervasive corruption and the threat of political instability, ethnic conflict and now – purportedly – a jihadist underbelly. In response, alongside counter-terror efforts to bolster Central Asian state security services with training and equipment, international policy towards Kyrgyzstan has become increasingly focused on ‘countering/preventing violent extremism’ (C/PVE).

Please follow the link provided to access the full paper A threat inflated? The countering and preventing violent extremism agenda in Kyrgyzstan.

 

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Doing research in conflict settings: Gender mainstreaming and ethics

Since 2017, Saferworld, International Alert and Conciliation Resources have worked together in the Peace Research Partnership (PRP), a three-year programme funded with UK aid from the UK government. The PRP conducts research in conflict-affected regions on inclusive economic development, peace processes and institutions, and on identifying how gender dynamics can drive conflict or peace.‘Gender mainstreaming’ – or the infusion of gender analysis into all aspects of research – continues to be a central component of the programme. This report outlines lessons from six case studies and workshop discussions with representatives of consortium research teams, which took place in London in November 2018. Overall, the lessons and recommendations across the case studies have been grouped into three categories that capture different stages of research, from inception and design to data collection and dissemination: 1) composition of research teams; 2) engaging with research participants; and 3) ethics and the purpose of research.

For full access to the paper, Doing research in conflict settings: Gender mainstreaming and ethics, kindly follow the link. 

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Peace and stability in South Sudan: Challenges and recommendations

Between July 2017 and February 2019, Saferworld – together with its partners – organised eight state-level roundtable discussions to identify peace and safety concerns and provide recommendations for strengthening community safety. The events brought together state-level and local authorities, heads of organised forces (military, police and national security), UN agencies, national and international NGOs, community-based organisations, community members, religious leaders, and youth and women leaders. This briefing presents the main findings of those discussions and outlines recommendations for national, state and local government and civil society for improving peace and stability in South Sudan.

For full access to the paper, Peace and stability in South Sudan: Challenges and recommendations, kindly follow the link.

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Understandings of Justice in Myanmar

The multitude of justice challenges confronting people in Myanmar means that there is significant scope for, and interest in, rule of law and access to justice programmes among both foreign and domestic actors. While attention to justice concerns is welcome, there is a danger of taking for granted that there are shared and agreed understandings about the meaning of justice and its role in society.

For full access to the report Understandings of Justice in Myanmar, kindly follow the link.

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Partners in crime? The impacts of Europe’s outsourced migration controls on peace, stability and rights

Migration into Europe has fallen since 2015, when more than one million people fleeing conflict and hardship attempted sea crossings. But deaths and disappearances in the central Mediterranean have shot up. This report analyses the European Union’s and European governments’ outsourcing of migration controls in ‘partner’ countries such as Turkey, Libya and Niger. It explores who benefits from this system, exposes its risks and explains who bears the costs. It also provides recommendations for European leaders on how to move toward a humane model for migration that refocuses on EU commitments to human rights, conflict prevention and sustainable development.

For full access to the report, Partners in crime? The impacts of Europe’s outsourced migration controls on peace, stability and rights, kindly follow the link. 

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The international security echo-chamber: getting civil society into the room

This paper states that there is a deadly paradox at the heart of international policy making: external interventions carried out in the name of security often end up undermining peace and security. The United States, European countries, the United Nations, and others are backing military, technical, financial, and diplomatic “security” initiatives all over the world, but their efforts often end up worsening and perpetuating the conflicts they are supposed to stop or prevent. All the while, the people worst affected have very little say about what’s going on around them.

For full access to the The international security echo-chamber: getting civil society into the room, kindly follow the link. 

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Time to Invest: How to Support Action on SDG16+

Four years into the implementation of Sustainable Development Goal 16+ (SDG16+), the picture is not encouraging. Efforts to mobilise action and generate investments for SDG16+ have fallen short and, unless something changes, will fail to achieve the global commitment to building more peaceful, just and inclusive societies by 2030.

Saferworld shows in their latest briefing, with a coherent approach and focused action there is still time to turn the situation around. Although many of the issues that fall under SDG16+ are complex and politically sensitive, there are a number of lessons and successes that will help practitioners better understand how to effectively support action on SDG16+.

For full access to the report Time to invest: how to support action on SDG16+, kindly follow the link. 

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Democratising Myanmar’s security sector: enduring legacies and a long road ahead

Drawing on extensive research and interviews, this new report identifies three areas where steps can be taken to democratise the security sector in Myanmar: giving more power to elected civilians as representatives of the people; transforming the security culture; and protecting and building civic space. The work ahead is best viewed as a multi-decade challenge, and sustained action from a wide range of organisations and individuals is needed to bring about generational change.

For full access to the report Democratising Myanmar’s security sector: enduring legacies and a long road ahead, please follow the link. 

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Other Documents

Saferworld: Annual Review 2014-15

Last year marked not only Saferworld's 25th anniversary but also the first year of their new three-year strategic plan. As well as updates from their programme and policy work, the review includes case studies, partner profiles and summary financial information.

The PDF/print review presents highlights from across their thematic and regional work, as well as two case studies: one from their community security programme in South Sudan, the other marking Saferworld's 25th anniversary.

The interactive multimedia version of the review features additional multimedia content such as videos and photo galleries; extra case studies on masculinities and conflict, peacebuilding in Pakistan, and Saferworld's partnership with FIQ in Kosovo; as well as partner profiles and a map highlighting the regions they work in.

Download the review here

Other Document

A new constitution brings challenges and opportunities for Nepal

Nepal’s draft constitution was put into effect on 20 September 2015 – eight years after the end of conflict and the day before International Peace Day. Saferworld’s Nepal programme reflects on the major socio-political changes the country is experiencing as a result, and the opportunities and challenges facing the state in implementing the constitution and achieving long-term peace.

Read the article on the challenges and opportunities facing Nepal's new constitution.

Other Document

Afghanistan's transition: challenges and opportunities for peace

This briefing examines key challenges and opportunities to Afghanistan’s peace and security in coming years and considers the role Afghan civil society can play in helping the country move in the right direction, looking at areas including governance, security sector, the position of women, and the dilemmas of international support.

Other Document

Snapshot of Local Security and Justice Perceptions in Selected Districts of Nepal

After more than a decade of conflict, Nepal is now on the road to consolidating democracy and forging a sustainable peace. This has provided opportunities for building state infrastructure and further strengthening security and justice provision in response to the needs of Nepal’s citizens. While ongoing and emerging political and security challenges, as well as inadequate resources, have challenged the strengthening and further improvement of effective, accountable, and accessible security and justice sector institutions, there are also examples where security and justice providers are able to reach out to citizens and collaborate with them to make local security and justice provision more people-centred and effective. Clear opportunities exist for further strengthening effective security and justice provision and, in turn, improving the real and perceived public safety, security, and justice of the Nepali people.

This report investigates the security- and justice-related experiences and perceptions of people living in nine districts in Nepal, representing geographically, ethnically, and economically diverse communities. It focuses specifically on assessing the perceptions of various stakeholders – including communities (with input from men and women for a gender perspective), local authorities, the private sector, and security and justice providers – on local public safety, security, and justice and how these have changed over the past two years, as well as key causes of insecurity. Some of the problems highlighted are specific to certain groups, while others are more generally shared.

Key findings from the research point to:

  • Women have a sense of declining security in recent years
  • Weak rule of law and impunity are the key structural cause of insecurity
  • The private sector continues to be undermined by insecurity.
Other Document