NATO

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Case Studies

Involvement of Parliaments in Advancing the ‘Women, Peace and Security’ Agenda in NATO Member Countries

In 2013, the NATO Parliamentary Assembly commissioned DCAF to provide an analysis of responses to a survey of Member Countries regarding national implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 on women, peace and security. The subsequent study, “Involvement of Parliaments in Advancing the Women, Peace and Security’ Agenda in NATO Member Countries,” analyses the role of national parliaments in establishing and monitoring legal and policy initiatives put in place by NATO Member Countries to implement Resolution 1325. Its findings point to an increased level of parliamentary involvement in advancing this agenda in countries that have adopted national action plans for implementing United Nations Security Council resolutions on women, peace and security.

DCAF presented the findings of this study at the NATO Parliamentary Assembly 2013 Annual Session in Dubrovnik, Croatia.

Case Study

Tools

Sample Lesson Plans for Teaching Gender to the Military

Three lesson plans for teaching gender to the military developed by experts on military education, gender training for the military and integrating gender in military operations developed at the 17th meeting of the Security Sector Reform Working Group of the Partnership for Peace Consortium, hosted in Garmisch-Partenkirchen from 12 to 14 December 2012 in collaboration with the Education Development Working Group and the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies.

Tool

Videos

Inside the Issues Ep. 2:

In episode two, Senior Fellow and Afghan expert Mark Sedra traces the roots of today's governance challenges in Afghanistan, and explains why he is now less optimistic that the country will eventually be stabilized.

Video

Policy and Research Papers

PfP Consortium Workshop on Gender & Security Sector Reform

The Partnership for Peace Consortium’s Security Sector Reform Working Group held a workshop entitled “Gender & Security Sector Reform” from 17 to 19 February 2010. The workshop, hosted by DCAF, was an opportunity for thirty-six practitioners, researchers and policy advisors from sixteen NATO and PfP countries to discuss and exchange on ongoing efforts and challenges to integrating a gender perspective into SSR. The workshop focused on best practices and examples from the ground in both national and international security sector institutions, including NATO peace support operations, ministries of defence, and armed forces.

Paper

The EU, NATO and the Integration of Europe: Rules and Rhetoric

Why did Western European states agree to the enlargement of the EU and NATO? Frank Schimmelfennig analyzes the history of the enlargement process and develops a theoretical approach of 'rhetorical action' to explain why it occurred. While rationalist theory explains the willingness of East European states to join the NATO and EU, it does not explain why member states decided to admit them. Using original data, Schimmelfennig shows that expansion to the East can be understood in terms of liberal democratic community building. Drawing on the works of Jon Elster and Erving Goffman, he demonstrates that the decision to expand was the result of rhetorical action. Candidates and their supporters used arguments based on collective identity, norms and values of the Western community to shame opponents into acquiescing to enlargement. This landmark book makes an enormous contribution to theory in international relations and to the study of European politics.

Access full paper at http://www.cambridge.org/gb/knowledge/isbn/item1170965/?site_locale=en_GB

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Lessons from NATO’s Military Missions in the Western Balkans

The subject of learning lessons is fraught with difficulties, not least because lessons,like beauty, are often in the eye of the beholder. It has been the author’s experience that many lessons that are formally identified as such are not learned. The reasons for this are varied: those identifying the lessons may be biased; the resources to enable learning may be lacking; and the lessons simply may not “stick.” Nonetheless, those lessons that do become embedded in the human and organizational psyche are those that have created new doctrines, reshaped institutions, become an integral part of new training standards, and demonstrably shown an improvement in the conduct of business. NATO’s involvement in the Western Balkans over the past fifteen years has provided a rich vein of experience and has fomented considerable change. This article examines that experience and analyzes some of the major lessons that have been identified. Some will have been learned, while others have not; in some instances, the lessons that were identified will subsequently prove to be flawed. Throughout this analysis the paper will attempt to chart the metamorphosis of NATO from a passive Cold War military alliance to an active political and security actor on the world stage.

Access or download the full paper at: http://www.isn.ethz.ch/Digital-Library/Publications/Detail/?ots591=eb06339b-2726-928e-0216-1b3f15392dd8&lng=en&id=122284

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EU and NATO: Co-operation or Competition ?

Recent years have seen protracted attempts to agree and then to consummate a durable strategic partnership between the European Union and the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation. With the globalisation of security concerns and with the series of major terrorist attacks beginning on 11th September 2001, it has become increasingly difficult to rationalise a Cold War-style separation of the two organisations, with NATO offering ‘hard’ or military power, and the EU offering a ‘soft’ or civil alternative. There are compelling reasons to expect close collaboration between the two organisations: there is considerable overlap in membership; members of both organisations, new and old, are constrained in their defence spending and cannot maintain commitments to support two entirely separate multilateral military structures; and contemporary security challenges no longer respect institutional boundaries, if indeed they ever did. Furthermore, the simple proximity of the two organisations in Brussels creates a widespread expectation that the EU and NATO should be in constant dialogue on issues of mutual concern. It can only  appear inefficient and dysfunctional, for example, that the representative of a foreign government might visit one body but not the other, that NATO does not offer a conduit to the EU, and vice versa, and that the two organisations have not developed mutually reinforcing diplomatic positions. 

Collaboration between NATO and the EU has become an enduring theme in speeches and
statements concerning transatlantic security.

Access the full paper at: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/meetdocs/2004_2009/documents/dv/eunatorelations_/eunatorelations_en.pdf

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Alliances and Conflict Resolution: NATO’s Role in Security Sector Reform

In the post-9/11 world, the United States (U.S.) has had to cope with “long wars” in Iraq and Afghanistan. What is common between the cases of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts is that even after major combat operations ended, the military presence of multinational forces has not been scaled down as planned. In Afghanistan, the size of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) has been expanding. As post-conflict stabilization operations have not made smooth progress as anticipated, allies and coalition partners have to accelerate reform of the security sector including armed forces and police. With current realities of Afghanistan and Iraq flatly contradicting the prewar optimism  entertained by the Bush Administration, Western powers will have to stay engaged in postwar peacebuilding for some time.

In the post-9/11 world, the United States (U.S.) has had to cope with “long wars” in Iraq and Afghanistan. What is common between the cases of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts is that even after major combat operations ended, the military presence of multinational forces has not been scaled down as planned. In Afghanistan, the size of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) has been expanding. As post-conflict stabilization operations have not made smooth progress as anticipated, allies and coalition partners have to accelerate reform of the security sector including armed forces and police. With current realities of Afghanistan and Iraq flatly contradicting the prewar optimism  entertained by the Bush Administration, Western powers will have to stay engaged in postwar peacebuilding for some time.

Access full paper at http://www.nids.go.jp/english/publication/kiyo/pdf/2009/bulletin_e2009_5.pdf

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The Kosovo Protection Corps. A Critical Study of its De-activation as a Transition

This paper has been written from a practitioner’s perspective. The author spent 6 months embedded with the Kosovo Protection Corps (KPC) command team, spending hours in their company during its de-activation. Whether visiting KPC headquarters across the country; sitting in meetings at the highest echelons of Government; or accompanying the Commander and Deputy Commander to the Kosovo Force (KFOR) HQ in Pristina, the author had unprecedented access and exposure at the heart of the organisation.

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Council of Europe Draft Report on Inhuman treatment of people and illicit trafficking in human organs in Kosovo

This is a draft report by Mr Dick Marty to the Committee on Legal Affairs and Human Rights of the Council of Europe on Inhuman treatment of people and illicit trafficking in human organs in Kosovo.

Paper

Policy Impact Assessment Report on the NATO Building Integrity Programme

The NATO Building Integrity (BI) Programme is a defence capacity-building programme that aims to provide member states, partners and other states with tailored support to reduce the risk of corruption and enhance the understanding and practice of good governance in their defence establishments. This assessment examines the impacts achieved since the previous assessment was conducted in 2014. The assessment is based on statements of impact made in questionnaires completed by serving defence department officials of participating states. 

For full access to the report, Policy Impact Assessment Report on the NATO Building Integrity Programme, please follow the link. 

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