Senegal, Republic of

Senegal, Republic of

Case Studies

Genre et sécurité au Sénégal

Selected Resources

Audio: Women as Soldiers? Interview on Gender Mainstreaming in the Senegalese Armed Forces, West Africa Democracy Radio interview with Elisabeth Feleke, Regional Program Manager for West Africa for the Africa Center for Strategic Studies (ACSS)

Dans cette étude, réalisée pour DCAF et en collaboration avec l’Alliance pour la migration, le leadership et le développement (AMLD), Fatou Sarr de l’Université Cheikh Anta Diop à Dakar présente un état des lieux de la prise en compte de la dimension genre dans le secteur de la sécurité au Sénégal. L’étude présente notamment une cartographie des acteurs impliqués dans la gestion de la sécurité, incluant les forces armées et la gendarmerie nationale, la police et le groupement national des sapeurs pompiers, les corps paramilitaires, le ministère de l’Intérieur, le ministère des Forces armées, le ministère de la Justice, le ministère de la Famille, de la Sécurité alimentaire, de l’Entreprenariat féminin, de la Micro finance et de la Petite enfance, le parlement, la société civile, les organisations et réseaux régionaux, les organisations internationales et les missions diplomatiques et militaires. Pour chacune de ces institutions, l’auteure trace un portrait des modalités de prise en charge des questions de genre, des bonnes pratiques et des obstacles rencontrés. Enfin, des propositions relatives aux questions de genre et à la sécurité sont également énoncées afin d’accompagner le gouvernement et les autres parties prenantes dans la définition et la mise en œuvre de politiques d’intervention pertinentes.

DCAF 2010

case study

Tools

Tool 1 : Political Leadership and National Ownership of Security Sector Reform Processes

Tool 1 of the Toolkit for Security Sector Reform and Governance in West Africa by DCAF addresses political will and national ownership, fundamental requirements of SSR processes.

Without the strong political commitment of national authorities, SSR will fail, regardless of the material resources and technical expertise invested into it. SSR must be home-grown, designed to meet country-specific needs, and led by national stakeholders who take full responsibility for it. For SSR to produce sustainable results, it is also essential to ensure the active involvement of a critical mass of citizens - men and women - from all strata of society in the definition and implementation of a reform agenda that reflects a shared vision of security. Unless it relies on an inclusively defined and widely shared vision of security, SSR cannot succeed.

Acknowledging the challenges that may arise in the process of operationalising these principles, Tool 1 offers practical guidance on how to reinforce national ownership and leadership while defining an inclusive, national vision of security as a basis for a security sector reform. It provides an overview of potential entry points for SSR in the broader framework of national governance in a West African setting. It also suggests how to institutionalise the national leadership and coordination of an SSR process, including through strategic communication.

The Tool is primarily intended for policy and other strategic decision makers, government officials involved in security sector governance, national SSR advisers and practitioners. It will also provide members of parliament, other oversight institutions, civil society organisations and development partners with an overview of the responsibilities of the executive in SSR and how to uphold national ownership throughout the process.

For more information on the tool Political Leadership and National Ownership of Security Sector Reform Processes, kindly follow the link to the DCAF website.

Follow the links to access the other documents in the Toolkit for Security Sector Reform and Governance in West Africa: 

Tool 2: Security Sector Reform Programming

Tool 4: Effective Management of External Support to Security Sector Reform

Tool 6: Civil Society Involvement in Security Sector Reform and Governance

The publication is also available in français and português.

Tool

Tool 2 : Security Sector Reform Programming

The conduct of an SSR process requires translating a political, national vision of security into an operational programme and defining the different concrete actions needed to generate the desired societal change and improve security for all. SSR programming provides tools both to determine the nature of the change sought in the functioning of the security sector and to plan implementation in a structured manner that is measurable over time.

Tool 2 of the Toolkit for Security Sector Reform and Governance in West Africa addresses the successive programming steps that enable the development and rolling out of a context-relevant SSR programme. These steps range from an initial needs assessment to the setting up of coordination mechanisms aimed at ensuring overall coherence of national SSR efforts. The Tool offers practical advice for prioritising and sequencing reform actions, budgeting the programme and mobilising the resources necessary for its implementation, establishing viable and efficient management mechanisms, coordinating national and international actors involved in the implementation of the programme and developing a communication strategy to support transparency and sustain national ownership.

For more information on Tool 2 : Security Sector Reform Programming, kindly follow the link to the DCAF website.

Follow the links to access the other documents in the Toolkit for Security Sector Reform and Governance in West Africa: 

Tool 1: Political Leadership and National Ownership of Security Sector Reform Processes

Tool 4: Effective Management of External Support to Security Sector Reform

Tool 6: Civil Society Involvement in Security Sector Reform and Governance

This publication is also available in français and português.

Tool

Ferramenta 1 : Liderança Política e Apropriação Nacional dos Processos da Reforma do Sector de Segurança

Esta ferramenta 1 « Liderança Política e Apropriação Nacional dos Processos da Reforma do Sector de Segurança », parte da « Caixa de Ferramentas para a Reforma e Governação do Sector de Segurança na África Ocidental », fornece orientações práticas para as autoridades nacionais da África Ocidental sobre como abordar a RSS de uma forma que demonstre liderança e garanta uma apropriação nacional inclusiva. Ressalva a importância da vontade política na formulação de políticas relacionadas com o sector de segurança, a necessidade de envolver actores não-estatais não só na fase inicial, mas também durante todo o processo de reforma, e a necessidade de articular a RSS com outras políticas e reformas à escala nacional. A ferramenta também se debruça sobre o papel desempenhado pela CEDEAO, que apoia os estados-membros na construção de processos de reforma endógenos. Aborda igualmente os desafios práticos que as autoridades nacionais poderão vir a enfrentar na concepção e implementação de processos de RSS, propondo também soluções para enfrentá-los.

A ferramenta pretende ser um recurso para os responsáveis pela tomada de decisões estratégicas, funcionários governamentais, consultores nacionais e outros profissionais de RSS. Também disponibilizará aos membros do parlamento, a outras instituições de supervisão, às organizações da sociedade civil (OSC) e aos parceiros de desenvolvimento uma visão geral das responsabilidades que o poder executivo tem na RSS e sobre como garantir a apropriação nacional ao longo do processo.

Para maiores informações sobre a Ferramenta 1 : Liderança Política e Apropriação Nacional dos Processos da Reforma do Sector de Segurança, siga o link para o website do DCAF.

Por favor, siga o link para ter acesso às outros documentos da Caixa de Ferramentas para a Reforma e Governação do Sector de Segurança na África Ocidental: 

Ferramenta 2 : Programação da Reforma do Sector de Segurança

Ferramenta 4 : Gestão Eficaz do Apoio Externo à Reforma do Sector de Segurança

Ferramenta 6 : Envolvimento da Sociedade Civil na Governação e Reforma do Sector de Segurança

Esta é a versão em Português da publicação. It is also available in English et disponible en français.

Tool

Podcasts

Governance and Security in the Sahel

This conference brought together experts of West Africa and the Sahel specifically to shed light on the implications of elections, radicalization, and rising threats from jihadi militants and other armed conflict actors.This tripartite political phenomenon has significant consequences for governance and security in the region and beyond.

The conference addressed the practice and significance of multiparty elections in contexts of competitive authoritarian regimes, post-intervention transitions, and governance reforms – particularly in Mali, Burkina Faso, and Senegal. It also assessed logics of radicalization, consequences for security strategies, and logics of military engagement both for state actors and international forces. Finally, it assessed the distinct threats arising from Jihadi groups in the region, state militarization, and migrant trajectories.

To listen to the podcast, Governance and Security in the Sahel, please follow the link.

Podcast

Policy and Research Papers

Liberia: Uneven Progress in Security Sector Reform

Little more than five years ago, Liberia was emerging from fourteen years of brutal war and pillage that had left it in ruins. today, it has a democratically elected president, and the security sector is experiencing reforms that are unprecedented not only in the country, but in the world. Under cover of a 15,000-strong UN peacekeeping force, it drew both its army and defence ministry to zero, in order to recruit, vet and train the personnel for these institutions from the ground up. Such "root and branch" security sector reform (SSR) was bold. But, given the many abuses perpetrated by the Armed Forces of Liberia (AFL) both before and during the civil war, the vast majority of Liberians supported it.

Paper

Dépenses militaires et importations d’armes dans cinq États ouest-africains

Capture1

La présente note publiée par le Groupe de recherche et d’information sur la paix et la sécurité (GRIP) est consacrée à l’évolution des dépenses militaires et aux achats d’armes de la dernière décennie de cinq pays francophones d’Afrique de l’Ouest : le Burkina Faso, la Côte d’Ivoire, le Mali, le Niger et le Sénégal. Aucun de ces pays ne peut être considéré comme une grande puissance, mais la plupart d’entre eux ont récemment choisi la voie d’un net renforcement de leur potentiel militaire, apparemment en riposte aux menaces terroristes et sécessionnistes qui secouent la sous-région. Sans trancher sur le bien-fondé d’une réponse militaire à ce type de menaces, la note tente de fournir un éclairage sur la quantité de ressources affectées à la défense et la sécurité, en les comparant dans la durée et au regard des dépenses affectées aux besoins sociaux des populations de ces pays.

Pour accéder à la note Dépenses militaires et importations d’armes dans cinq États ouest-africains, veuillez cliquer sur le lien.

Paper

Ombuds Institutions for the armed forces in francophone countries of sub-Saharan Africa

Ombudsmen Sub Saharan Africa DCAF

This mapping study on ombuds institutions for the armed forces in francophone sub-Saharan African states is a project initiated under the aegis of the Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie (OIF) in collaboration with the Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces (DCAF), in the framework of the OIF programme “Providing Support to Peacekeeping and Peacebuilding”.

The mapping study is the continuation of extensive research conducted within the context of a first project entitled “Ombuds Institutions for the Armed Forces in Francophone Africa: Burkina Faso, Burundi and Senegal.” The objectives of the mapping study are to develop a comprehensive analysis of the activities and role of the ombuds institutions; to identify factors that may facilitate or hinder the establishment and functioning of such institutions; to encourage ombuds institutions to deal with the armed forces and to improve the functioning and effectiveness of existing institutions; and to involve the ombuds institutions of the states concerned in the global process of exchanging good practice and experience between existing ombuds institutions.

The research explores sub-Saharan states, some with ombuds institutions whose mandates include military matters (Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Niger, Senegal, and Togo), some who have established general ombuds institutions, but without such jurisdiction over the armed forces (Burundi, Côte d’Ivoire, Republic of Guinea, Madagascar and Mali), and some who lack these institutions (Comoros and the Democratic Republic of the Congo). The paper delineates some common characteristics of general ombuds institutions, before pointing the challenges they confront, from the level of resources to a lack of visibility.

To access the Ombuds Institutions for the armed forces in francophone countries of sub-Saharan Africa, kindly follow the link.

Paper

Monitoring de la stabilité régionale dans le bassin sahélien et en Afrique de l'Ouest (Octobre à décembre 2016)

Ce monitoring trimestriel, publié par le GRIP depuis 2011, est réalisé dans le cadre d’un projet intitulé « Contribution à l’amélioration de la sécurité humaine, à la prévention des conflits et au renforcement de l’état de droit en Afrique sub-saharienne », financé par le ministère des Affaires étrangères du Grand-Duché du Luxembourg. Il a pour but de suivre la situation sécuritaire en Afrique de l’Ouest avec un accent plus particulier sur le Burkina Faso, la Côte d’Ivoire, la Guinée, le Mali, le Niger et le Sénégal. Il se penche sur les questions de sécurité interne au sens large, les tensions régionales, la criminalité et les trafics transfrontaliers.

Pour accéder à l'étude Monitoring de la stabilité régionale dans le bassin sahélien et en Afrique de l'Ouest , veuillez cliquer sur le lien.

Paper

The Privatisation of security in Africa: Challenges and lessons from Côte d’Ivoire, Mali and Senegal

Private security in Africa is booming. Whether from the perspective of major multinational players or small-scale local enterprises, the market for commercial security has expanded and evolved over  recent years. However, policy makers rarely address private security, national parliaments and regulatory bodies provide limited oversight in this area, and the attention of African media and civil society is localized and sporadic. In short, a fundamental shift in the African security landscape is taking place under the radar of democratic governance. The Privatisation of Security in Africa – Challenges and Lessons from Côte d’Ivoire, Mali and Senegal provides expert accounts which portray the realities of the contemporary private security industry in Africa. The volume analyses key characteristics of security privatisation in Africa, offers new insights into the significance of this phenomenon from a security sector governance perspective and identifies specific entry points that should inform processes to promote good governance of the security sector in Africa.

To access the full report The Privatisation of security in Africa: Challenges and lessons from Côte d’Ivoire, Mali and Senegal, kindly click on the link.

Paper

Monitoring de la stabilité régionale dans le bassin sahélien et en Afrique de l’Ouest – Avril à juin 2017

Ce monitoring trimestriel, publié par le GRIP depuis 2011, a pour but de suivre la situation sécuritaire en Afrique de l’Ouest avec un accent plus particulier sur le Burkina Faso, la Côte d’Ivoire, la Guinée, le Mali, le Niger et le Sénégal. Il se penche sur les questions de sécurité interne au sens large, les tensions régionales, la criminalité et les trafics transfrontaliers. 

Pour accéder à l'étude Monitoring de la stabilité régionale dans le bassin sahélien et en Afrique de l’Ouest – Avril à juin 2017, veuillez suivre le lien. 

Paper

Contrôle des armes légères et de petit calibre au Sénégal: pratiques et enjeux

En Afrique de l'Ouest, où l'on observe une persistance des groupes armés et un développement du terrorisme djihadiste, la prolifération et la circulation illicite des armes légères et de petit calibre (ALPC) demeurent un enjeu sécuritaire majeur. Malgré le conflit de basse intensité en Casamance et la présence d'une criminalité armée dans certaines zones du pays, le Sénégal apparaît comme l'un des pays les moins affectés par la violence armée dans la sous-région. Outre la bonne gouvernance du Sénégal, limitant les motifs de confrontations armées, les différentes mesures en matière de contrôle des ALPC prises par ce pays peuvent aussi expliquer ce résultat. Cette note se penche sur la problématique des ALPC au Sénégal et se propose d'analyser les initiatives et les mesures de contrôle dans ce domaine. 

Pour accéder à Contrôle des armes légères et de petit calibre au Sénégal: pratiques et enjeux, veuillez cliquer le lien.

Paper

Monitoring de la stabilité régionale dans le bassin sahélien et en Afrique de l'Ouest

Ce monitoring trimestriel, publié par le GRIP depuis 2011, a pour but de suivre la situation sécuritaire en Afrique de l’Ouest avec un accent plus particulier sur le Burkina Faso, la Côte d’Ivoire, la Guinée, le Mali, le Niger et le Sénégal. Il se penche sur les questions de sécurité interne au sens large, les tensions régionales, la criminalité et les trafics transfrontaliers.

Afin d'accéder à l'analyse, Monitoring de la stabilité régionale dans le bassin sahélien et en Afrique de l'Ouest, veuillez suivre le lien.

Paper

La sécurité frontalière en Afrique de l’Ouest : migration, construction des États et nouvelles technologies

Cette analyse se penche sur les multiples pratiques de sécurité frontalière en Afrique de l’Ouest, regroupées autour de trois dimensions : la gestion des flux migratoires par une coopération policière de plus en plus étroite, le renforcement de capacités matérielles et infrastructurelles facilitant la construction de l’État, et une confiance accrue dans les technologies de l’information telles que l’identification biométrique.

Afin d'accéder à l'analyse, La sécurité frontalière en Afrique de l’Ouest : migration, construction des États et nouvelles technologies, veuillez suivre le lien.

Paper

Le problème du contrôle des groupes de vigilance en Afrique de l’Ouest francophone : Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Sénégal

En Afrique, les groupes de vigilance varient énormément dans l’espace et le temps. Généralement, on explique l’émergence des groupes de vigilance par une aggravation assez intolérable et persistante de l’insécurité. Ils suppléent ainsi les carences de l’État dans les zones peu ou mal desservies par la police publique.

Ainsi à travers eux, ce sont les populations directement touchées par des crimes spécifiques qui s’approprient leurs problèmes et génèrent une entité chargée de les résoudre. Ces groupes permettent en outre de rendre disponible le bien collectif qu’est la sécurité à des populations qui en sont dépourvues. C’est une sécurité privée pour les couches défavorisées de la société.

Pour accéder à l'intégralité de la publication, Le problème du contrôle des groupes de vigilance en Afrique de l’Ouest francophone : Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Sénégal, veuillez bien vouloir suivre le lien.

Paper

Monitoring of regional Stability in the Sahel region and in West Africa – April to June 2019

This monitoring aims to monitor the security situation in West Africa with a focus on Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Guinea, Mali, Niger and Senegal. It examines in particular broad internal security issues, regional tensions, and cross-border and transnational crimes.

For full access to the report, Monitoring of regional Stability in the Sahel region and in West Africa – April to June 2019 kindly follow the link. 

Paper

Insécurité Maritime dans le Golfe de Guinée : Vers une Stratégie Régionale Intégrée ?

L’insécurité maritime se confirme comme l’une des menaces persistantes à la stabilité des États riverains du golfe de Guinée. En dépit d’une prise de conscience croissante et de la volonté politique d’y faire face, l’augmentation rapide des actes de piraterie a pris de court plusieurs pays de la région. L’absence d’un dispositif commun, relativement complet, de surveillance et de lutte contre la piraterie, limite encore la portée des initiatives prises par certains États, et qui ne couvrent pas l’ensemble de la région du golfe de Guinée. Une stratégie à long terme passe par la mutualisation des moyens, et par la coopération entre les trois organisations régionales, la CEEAC, la CEDEAO et la Commission du golfe de Guinée, ainsi que par l’implication d’autres acteurs du secteur maritime concernés par la lutte contre la piraterie dans la région.

Veuillez suivre ce lien sur l'Insécurité Maritime dans le Golfe de Guinée :  Vers une Stratégie Régionale Intégrée afin de lire la publication.

Paper

Monitoring de la stabilité régionale dans le bassin sahélien et en Afrique de l’Ouest – juillet à septembre 2019

Ce monitoring trimestriel, publié par le GRIP depuis 2011, a pour but de suivre la situation sécuritaire en Afrique de l’Ouest avec un accent plus particulier sur le Burkina Faso, la Côte d’Ivoire, la Guinée, le Mali, le Niger et le Sénégal. Il se penche sur les questions de sécurité interne au sens large, les tensions régionales, la criminalité et les trafics transfrontaliers. Ce monitoring trimestriel couvre la période juillet à septembre 2019. 

Afin d'accéder à l'analyse, Monitoring de la stabilité régionale dans le bassin sahélien et en Afrique de l'Ouest - julliet à septembre 2019, veuillez suivre le lien.

Paper

Summary Report: Integrating Human Security into National Security Policies in North-West Africa

The first ever regional conference on “Integrating Human Security into National Security Policies in North-West Africa” was hosted in Rabat 23-24 November 2010 by the Centre for Human Rights and Democracy Studies (CEDHD) and the Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces (DCAF), with the support of Switzerland. The conference brought together a large number of high-ranking representatives from North-West Africa and the Sahel region (Algeria, Burkina Faso, Mali, Morocco, Mauritania and Senegal) as well as a number of international experts. This was the first event of its kind to consider the development and implementation of national security policy from the regional perspective of North-West Africa.

Paper

Ombuds Institutions for the Armed Forces in Francophone Africa: Burkina Faso, Burundi and Senegal

Under the aegis of the Organisation internationale de la Francophonie (OIF) DCAF undertook three case studies in Burkina Faso, Burundi and Senegal each of which was prepared by country experts. Each study seeks to identify and facilitate the exchange of good practices and experiences between the states concerned, as well as among similar institutions around the world. Each study examines relevant national institutions, as well as their legal status, shedding light on their strengths and weaknesses and contributing to an evaluation of their capacity building needs. Each study also includes details of their complaints handling procedures and of standards that may be relevant to other similar institutions, contributing as a result to a deepened understanding of their mandates, remit, and functioning. Furthermore, these case studies provide a snapshot of the state of security sector governance in each of the three countries, as well as the progress of ongoing reforms.

Paper

Books

Security Sector Governance in Francophone West Africa

Experience shows that successful democratic transitions need to be underpinned by a security sector that is effective, well managed, and accountable to the state and its citizens. This is why it is so important to carefully examine security sector governance dynamics in contexts where security has often remained a 'reserved domain.' Understanding the issues and perspectives that divide political elites, the security sector, and citizens is the only way to develop security sector reform programs that are legitimate and sustainable at the national level. Through drawing on the close contextual knowledge of practitioners, researchers, and diverse local actors, this book supports this goal by analyzing security sector governance dynamics in each of the nine Francophone countries within West Africa. From this basis, strengths and weaknesses are analyzed, local capacities evaluated, and entry points identified to promote democratic security sector governance in the West African region. (Seri

Book