Robert Perito

Videos

Security Sector Transformation in North Africa and the Middle East - Part 1

On May 10, 2012, the USIP Center of Innovation for Security Sector Governance held its third annual conference. For the second year running, the conference focused on the pressing question of security sector reform in North Africa and the Middle East.

Part I:

9:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.  Welcome and Opening Remarks

9:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.  Panel of Representatives from the Region

  • Magda Boutros, Director, Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights, Egypt
  • Najla Elmangoush, former member of the National Transitional Council's Public Engagement Unit, Libya
  • Rana Jarhum, Human Rights Activist, Yemen
  • Dr. Murhaf Jouejati, Chairman of the National Consensus Movement and Member of the Syrian National Council, Syria
  • Dr. Radwan Masmoudi, President of the Center for the Study of Islam and Democracy, Tunisia
  • Hesham Sallam, Researcher, Egypt
Video

Security Sector Transformation in North Africa and the Middle East - Part 2

On May 10, 2012, the USIP Center of Innovation for Security Sector Governance held its third annual conference. For the second year running, the conference focused on the pressing question of security sector reform in North Africa and the Middle East. 

Part II:

10:45 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.  Panel of Former U.S. Ambassadors to the Region

  • Ambassador Barbara Bodine, Former U.S. Ambassador to Yemen (1997-2001)
  • Ambassador Rust Deming, Former U.S. Ambassador to Tunisia (2000-2003)
  • Ambassador Deborah Jones, Former U.S. Ambassador to Kuwait (2008-2011)
  • Ambassador Thomas Riley, Former U.S. Ambassador to Morocco (2003-2009)

11:50 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.  Closing Remarks

Video

Policy and Research Papers

Fighting Corruption in Security Sector Reform

This report is based on a February 25, 2010 panel presentation and the views expressed on fighting corruption in SSR during a meeting of the Security Sector
Reform Working Group. The panel consisted of Raymond Gilpin, vice president of the Center for Sustainable Economies at USIP, Rachel Nield, legal adviser at the Open Society Justice Initiative, former Chief of Police Michael Berkow (retired), president of Altegrity Security Consulting, and Alex Berg, a USIP peace scholar.

Paper

The Interior Ministry's Role in Security Sector Reform

In international peace and stability operations, reform of the interior ministry and the police forces under its control is critical to success. This is also an essential element in reforming the wider security sector, which includes the defense ministry and military forces. Yet surprisingly little has been written on the subject, and efforts to reform the interior ministries in Iraq and Afghanistan were done only on an ad-hoc basis. This report explains the role of the interior ministry, the needed steps in ministerial reform, and the role of foreign advisers in this process. It then describes the consequences of the U.S. failure to reform the interior ministry in Iraq and recommends changes in infrastructure and staffing that would enable the United States to conduct better ministerial reform in future operations.

To view this publication, please follow this link.

Paper

Afghanistan’s Civil Order Police: Victim of Its Own Success

  • In 2006, a day of deadly riot in Kabul dramatized the need for an Afghan constabulary force capable of controlling outbreaks of urban violence. In response, the U.S. military and Afghan authorities created a elite gendarmerie, the Afghanistan National Civil Order Police (ANCOP).
  • Although ANCOP was conceived of as a riot control force, it was assigned to the Focused District Development Program to replace district-level Afghan Uniformed Police who were away for training. The high demand and constant transfers required by this duty resulted in rates of attrition among ANCOP unit of 75 to 80 percent.
  • In 2010, ANCOP's superior training, firepower, and mobility were recognized in its assignments, along with a "surge" of U.S. military forces, to reverse the Taliban's hold on key areas in Southern Afghanistan.
  • In heavy fighting in Marja, Helmand province, ANCOP was demonstrably unprepared to serve as a counterinsurgency force, particularly in areas that had not been cleared by coalition and Afghan military forces.
  • Subsequent improvements in training and partnering with U.S. forces improved ANCOPS's performance in kandahar, where ANCOP was used to hold areas that had been cleared by the military.
  • By 2011, ANCOP had firmly established its place as an elite rapid reaction and counter-insurgency force with a positive reputation among coalition troops and afghan citizens.
Paper

Security Sector Reform in North Africa: Why It's Not Happening

Popular discontent with the repressive nature of security institutions and security forces in North Africa was the precipitating cause of the uprisings that composed the Arab Spring. Across the region the security apparatus was structured to protect regimes from their people. In the aftermath of regime change, it was evident in all countries that reform of the security sector was more than symbolically important. But why has it been so difficult for regional states to reform their security institutions? Why are we still talking about the need to reform the security sectors in these countries? This article answers these questions.

To access the article, click here.

Paper

Libya: A Post-Arab Spring Test for Security Sector Reform

If diplomatic pressure and the terrorist threat force Libya’s political factions to support the UN-backed Government of National Accord, Libya could provide a test bed for security sector reform (SSR) in a post-Arab Spring security environment that includes transnational terrorism and trafficking in drugs, weapons and migrants by international organized crime. This paper provides an overview of the Libyan conflict and current efforts to establish a transitional government. It maps the components of Libya’s security sector: military and police forces, justice institutions, and oversight institutions. It describes the elements of the proposed Government of National Accord and catalogues the tasks that must be performed to achieve SSR in Libya.

For full access to Libya: A Post-Arab Spring Test for Security Sector Reform, kindly follow the link. 

Paper