The South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA)

The South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) is South Africa’s premier research institute on international issues. As an independent, non-government think tank, they have a long history of providing thought leadership in Africa.

Their work spans social development, foreign policy, governance, the environment, and economic policy, linking local experiences with global debates. This body of African-generated knowledge provides local and regional decision-makers with independent, evidence-based options for Africa’s future development. 

All their findings are made available freely in the form of publications, policy briefs, videos, articles, workshops and conferences. They provide an open platform for the public to engage with these issues, and facilitate discussions between a wide variety of stakeholders.

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Policy and Research Papers

South Africa and the DRC: Evaluating a South–South Partnership for Peace, Governance and Development

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The ‘Rise of the South’ and the role of ‘emerging powers’ in global development has animated much of the political and economic discourse of the past decade. There is, however, little empirical evidence on the contribution that emerging Southern partners make to sustainable development, due to the lack of common measurement systems for South–South cooperation (SSC). The following case study published by The South African Institute of International Affairs utilises the analytical framework developed by the Network of Southern Think Tanks (NeST) to assess the range, extent and quality of South Africa’s peace, governance and economic support to the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). The study reveals that South Africa, in absolute financial terms, is a significant development partner in the DRC, and even exceeds the traditional donors when its aid is measured in proportion to gross national income. The qualitative field research highlights that South Africa’s approach to development co-operation to a large extent reflects the core values of SSC, although with a mixed bag of successes and failures in terms of the results of co-operation activities. This pilot study of the South Africa–DRC development partnership is one of the first in which the NeST conceptual and methodological framework has been tested for the purpose of further refining tools and indicators for SSC analysis, so as to assist the future monitoring and evaluation endeavours of South Africa and other emerging development partners.

To access to the full South Africa and the DRC: Evaluating a South–South Partnership for Peace, Governance and Development paper, kindly follow the link.

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'I Didn't Struggle to be Poor': The Interwovenness of Party, State and Business in Mozambique

The African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) Country Review Report (CRR) for Mozambique, published in July 2010, indicates that the interwovenness of party, government, state and business (hereafter referred to as interwovenness) is a serious issue in the country. An increasingly common phenomenon in Africa, the interwovenness and overlapping of political party officials, government officials and the business sector needs to be addressed. Although Mozambique – like many African countries – is saturated with anti-corruption initiatives, these are often poorly implemented and enforced. In order for the country to address the negative effects of interwovenness, additional measures need to be taken by civil society, the APRM Panel of Eminent Persons and the government.

For full access to 'I Didn't Struggle to be Poor': The Interwovenness of Party, State and Business in Mozambique, kindly follow the link.

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The European Union and security sector reform: South Sudan and the challenge of ownership

Security sector reform (SSR) is a cornerstone of the EU's crisis management activities. Africa, along with the Western Balkans and Eastern Europe, has received special emphasis in this regard from the EU. Thus, immediately after the independence of South Sudan, the EU deployed an aviation security mission, EUAVSEC South Sudan, within the framework of its Common Security and Defence Policy. The aim of the mission was to contribute to strengthening aviation security, border control and law enforcement under local ownership, in order to raise the standards at Juba Airport to internationally accepted levels. This paper analyses Common Security and Defence Policy engagement in the context of security sector reform in Africa and critically reflects on the implementation of the EU's comprehensive approach in South Sudan. Further, it examines to what extent local ownership could be achieved with regard to EUAVSEC South Sudan.

To access the full article, The European Union and security sector reform: South Sudan and the challenge of ownership, please follow the link provided.

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