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Project Coordinator

Location: Geneva, Switzerland
Application Contact: ISSATrecruitment@dcaf.ch  ()
Application Deadline: 07.02.2020. 23:59

DCAF – Geneva Centre for Security Sector Governance is dedicated to improving the security of states and their people within a framework of democratic governance, the rule of law, and respect for human rights. DCAF contributes to making peace and development more sustainable by assisting partner states and international actors supporting these states, to improve the governance of their security sector through inclusive and participatory reforms. It creates innovative knowledge products, promotes norms and good practices, provides legal and policy advice and supports capacity‐building of both state and non‐state security sector stakeholders.

DCAF's Foundation Council comprises 63 member states, the Canton of Geneva and six permanent observers. Active in over 70 countries, DCAF is internationally recognized as one of the world's leading centres of excellence for security sector governance (SSG) and security sector reform (SSR). DCAF is guided by the principles of neutrality, impartiality, local ownership, inclusive participation, and gender equality. For more information please visit www.dcaf.ch

ISSAT is a Department of DCAF established in 2008 in response to the need to increase the capacity of the international community to support Security Sector Governance/Reform (SSG/R) processes, to enhance the effectiveness and quality of SSG/R programming, and to facilitate the coordination and coherence of international assistance for nationally driven SSR/G processes. It provides practical support to the international community in its efforts to improve security and justice, primarily in conflict-affected and fragile states. It does this by working with a group of member states and institutions to develop and promote good security and justice reform practices and principles, and by helping its members to build their capacity to support national and regional security and justice reform processes. The ISSAT provides a deployable capacity to support its Governing Board Members. For more information, please see: www.issat.dcaf.ch

We are looking for a motivated and experienced individual for the role of:

Project Coordinator – (100 %)
Location: Geneva
Starting date: 1 April 2020 or upon mutual agreement
Duration: Unlimited

The role
Reporting to Deputy Head of ISSAT, the Project Coordinator will work to oversee, administer and organize all types of project coordination and reporting in relation to ISSAT’s mandates and activities across all ISSAT service lines and additional programmes.

Key areas of operation:
• Coordinate project management activities, resources, equipment and information
• Oversee compliance with internal processes (Approvals, budgeting, DCAF coordination, etc.)
• Coordinate and lead development of ISSAT reporting, including input into the DCAF annual report, RBM, and bilateral reports
• Provide continuity of knowledge over the full range of ISSAT projects and activities to assist in decision making
• Support the management and coordination meetings, including monitoring and informing IMT decision making
• Track staff time allocations and inform resource allocation to support timely delivery of projects and activities
• Contribute to the design and implementation of an effective project support function within ISSAT
• Oversee and maintain whole of ISSAT records management
• Manage Governing Board Meeting planning and implementation
• Manage the ISSAT project support team.

You:
• 5 years work experience as a Project Coordinator or similar role
• Experience in project management
• Solid organizational skills, including multitasking and time-management
• Experience with organisational results-based management
• Strong client-facing and teamwork skills
• Hands-on experience with project management tools (e.g. Trello, MS Project, Asana, or other)
• BSc in Business Administration or related field
• PMP / PRINCE2 certification is a plus
• Fluency in English. Other languages strongly desirable (particularly French or German); and,
• Swiss or EU citizenship, or a valid work permit for Switzerland at the time of application is a pre-requisite.

We offer:
• a rewarding, dynamic and challenging work experience;
• the chance to be part of a multicultural team of supportive, hardworking and values-driven people; and,
• the chance to contribute to a securer world.

If you think you are a good match for DCAF and the position advertised, please send your application to ISSATrecruitment@dcaf.ch by midnight (CET) Friday 7th February 2020 with the subject heading “APPLICATION Project Coordinator”, enclosing:
• a one-page motivational statement in English describing your story and what you can bring to DCAF; and,
• a concise CV (maximum two pages).

DCAF is an equal opportunities employer that considers applications from all qualified candidates.

Vacancy

Security Sector Reform Advisor

Location: Geneva, Switzerland
Application Contact: ISSATrecruitment@dcaf.ch ()
Application Deadline: 07.02.2020. 23:59

DCAF – Geneva Centre for Security Sector Governance is dedicated to improving the security of states and their people within a framework of democratic governance, the rule of law, and respect for human rights. DCAF contributes to making peace and development more sustainable by assisting partner states and international actors supporting these states, to improve the governance of their security sector through inclusive and participatory reforms. It creates innovative knowledge products, promotes norms and good practices, provides legal and policy advice and supports capacity‐building of both state and non‐state security sector stakeholders.

DCAF's Foundation Council comprises 63 member states, the Canton of Geneva and six permanent observers. Active in over 70 countries, DCAF is internationally recognized as one of the world's leading centres of excellence for security sector governance (SSG) and security sector reform (SSR). DCAF is guided by the principles of neutrality, impartiality, local ownership, inclusive participation, and gender equality. For more information please visit www.dcaf.ch.

ISSAT is a Department of DCAF established in 2008 in response to the need to increase the capacity of the international community to support Security Sector Governance/Reform (SSG/R) processes, to enhance the effectiveness and quality of SSG/R programming, and to facilitate the coordination and coherence of international assistance for nationally driven SSR/G processes. It provides practical support to the international community in its efforts to improve security and justice, primarily in conflict-affected and fragile states. It does this by working with a group of member states and institutions to develop and promote good security and justice reform practices and principles, and by helping its members to build their capacity to support national and regional security and justice reform processes. The ISSAT provides a deployable capacity to support its Governing Board Members. For more information, please see: www.issat.dcaf.ch

We are looking for a motivated and experienced individual for the role of:

SSR Advisor – (100 %)
Location: Geneva (with regular travel)
Starting date: 1 April 2020 or upon mutual agreement
Duration: Unlimited

The role:
Reporting to Deputy Head of ISSAT (with delegation to Heads of service lines (advisory field support (AFS), professional development and training (PDT), and advocacy & outreach and knowledge (OAK)) or other programme leads, depending on the task), the SSR Advisor will work in relation to ISSAT’s mandates and activities across all of the service lines.

Key areas of operation:

• Provide strategic and technical advice and guidance in the area of Security and Justice to ISSAT’s bilateral and multilateral Governing Board Members engaged in security and justice sector reform programme design, assessment and monitoring and evaluation missions;
• Lead or contribute to individual Justice and Security Sector Reform support missions related to mappings, assessments, programme design, mentoring, lessons identification, and monitoring and evaluation (M&E);
• Lead or contribute to the design and delivery of standardized or tailored training programmes, courses and conferences to meet donor, partner and organizational needs;
• Contribute to DCAF-ISSAT’s development and dissemination of knowledge products based on good practice and lessons identified from the field;
• Build and maintain effective liaison with ISSAT’s Governing Board Members, the wider SSR community, and other actors working on linked thematic areas; and,
• Input to the ISSAT strategic planning and prioritisation.

You:
• Over 7 years relevant experience in security or justice reform contexts;
• Significant knowledge and experience in: assessments, programme design, setting up monitoring mechanisms, evaluations;
• Significant knowledge and experience in one or more of the following: governance mechanisms, justice reform, police reform, defence reform, border management, non-state security and justice providers, public financial management;
• Programme and project management skills;
• Good communication (verbal and written), influencing and presentation skills;
• Able to analyse situations quickly and effectively, adapt to rapidly changing circumstances and produce workable solutions to meet customer requirements;
• Knowledge of bilateral and/or multilateral approaches to SSR (e.g. AU, EU, OSCE, UN, etc), as well as knowledge of latest developments in the fields of rule of law, justice reform including transitional justice, human rights, gender;
• Masters degree in anthropology, development, law, conflict studies, international relations, or a related field;
• Fluency in English. Other languages strongly desirable (particularly French, German, Spanish, Arabic or Portuguese); and,
• Swiss or EU citizenship, or a valid work permit for Switzerland at the time of application is a pre-requisite.

We offer:
• a rewarding, dynamic and challenging work experience;
• the chance to be part of a multicultural team of supportive, hardworking and values-driven people; and,
• the chance to contribute to a more secure world.

If you think you are a good match for DCAF and the position advertised, please send your application to ISSATrecruitment@dcaf.ch by midnight (CET) Friday 7 February 2020 with the subject heading “APPLICATION SSR Advisor”, enclosing:
• a one-page motivational statement in English describing your story and what you can bring to DCAF; and,
• a concise CV (maximum two pages).

DCAF is an equal opportunities employer that considers applications from all qualified candidates.

Vacancy

Head of Professional Development and Training

Location: Geneva, Switzerland
Application Deadline: 17.12.2019. 12:00

DCAF’s International Security Sector Advisory Team (ISSAT) is looking for the new Head of Professional Development and Training service line.

The candidate will among other responsibilities oversee the portfolio of ISSAT’s current trainings in supporting security and justice reform, and identify and assess future professional development, learning and training needs of the globally deployed SSR practitioners from ISSAT’s bilateral and multilateral Governing Board Members. The candidate will develop professional and learning development pathways and curriculum for SSR practitioners, which may include training modules as well as other learning, coaching and mentoring opportunities, ensuring that such pathways are designed in line with international best practices. 

For more information of the vacancy as Head of Professional Development and Training at DCAF-ISSAT, kindly follow the link. 

Vacancy

DCAF Programme Advisor for Results and Learning

Location: Geneva, Switzerland
Application Deadline: 20.11.2019. 12:00

DCAF Operation Department is looking for a Programme Advisor, in its Sub -Saharan Africa Divison. The Programme Advisor for Results and Learning supports a result and learning approach to program management in the Division. She/he is responsible for Sub -Saharan Africa Divison performance management system and in producing regular internal and external cases or articles on programme and divisional performance and achievements. She/he contributes to developing new projects/programs and in raising funds for these new initiatives. She/he assists the Sub -Saharan Africa Divison's management in using the performance information for decision-making, resource allocation, and lesson learning. This is a four-month assignment to cover maternity leave for the incumbent.

For more information about the vacancy as Programme Advisor, kindly follow the link. 

Vacancy

Senior SSR Advisor/Programme Manager

Location: Geneva, Switzerland
Application Contact: (africa.programme@dcaf.ch)
Application Deadline: 10.11.2019. 12:00

DCAF's Sub-Saharan Africa Division are seeking a dynamic, organised and creative individual to be the next Senior SSR Advisor/Programme Manager. 

The Senior SSR Advisor/Programme Manager will provide management oversight and technical expertise to a soon to be launched comprehensive police reform programme in the Horn of Africa and will contribute to regional security sector governance initiatives. He/she will lead the process of articulating programme frameworks, including Theories of Change, monitoring and evaluation components and budgets, and identify and pursue new project opportunities. He/She will coach, guide and contribute to the professional development of Sub-Saharan Africa Division's programme staff and articulate and share lessons from the Sub-Saharan Africa Division work to the larger community of practice.  

For more details and application to the position as Senior SSR Advisor/Programme Manager, please follow the link. 

Vacancy

Resident Coordinator / SSR Advisor

Location: Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Application Contact: (africa.programme@dcaf.ch )
Application Deadline: 15.11.2019. 12:00

DCAF's Sub-Saharan Africa Division are seeking a dynamic, organised and creative individual to be the next Resident Project Coordinator/SSR Adviser in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. 

The Resident Project Coordinator/SSR Advisor will provide overall leadership to DCAF’s programme in support of the Ethiopian Federal Police (EFP) in its efforts to achieve greater accountability, transparency and effectiveness. The programme is intended to lay the foundation for longer term development of a police service that can respond to the population’s needs. He/She will provide both strategic and technical support as well as coordinating a team of international and national experts. He/She will represent DCAF in Ethiopia and will report to DCAF's Head of the Sub-Saharan Africa Division.

For more information about the vacancy Resident Coordinator / SSR Advisor, please follow the link. 

Vacancy

Project Coordinator – SDG16

Location: Geneva, Switzerland
Period: 06.01.2020. to Indefinite
Application Contact: (prdrecruitment@dcaf.ch )
Application Deadline: 15.11.2019. 12:00

The 2030 Agenda on Sustainable Development (SDGs) is a global action plan for sustainable development and a key priority for the United Nations and its member States. Currently, little work has been done to link Security Sector Governance/Reform (SSG/R) with the SDGs, despite there being considerable overlap between the two realms. Against this background, DCAF will conduct a three-year project linking SSG/R with the SDGs. The project will focus specifically on governance and oversight, and will work with three important actors of governance of the security sector: parliaments, civil society and independent oversight institutions. The project entails the development of knowledge products, the organisation of high-level policy events, and the conduct of national workshops focused on implementation.

For full details about the position Project Coordinator – SDG16, please follow the link.

Vacancy

The Security and Human Rights Grant

Location: Switzerland
Application Deadline: 15.11.2019. 12:00

The SHRIM is a multi-donor trust fund set up by DCAF in 2016, to promote the on-the-ground implementation of better security and human rights good practices, in a cost-effective way that minimizes bureaucracy and fosters local ownership. Since 2016 six projects have been implemented, which have made a positive impact in over 23 countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

The Security and Human Rights Grant will award a maximum of CHF 30’000 (each) to two to three innovative projects coming from local organizations based in the Global South that are seeking to support the implementation of security and human rights good practices linked to the operations of extractive or private security companies.

For more information and application to the The Security and Human Rights Grant, please follow the link. 

Vacancy

Recruitment of an expert(s) to produce a "Practical guide on the role of non-state actors of justice and security in the reform of the sector security in West Africa"

Application Contact: (africa.programme@dcaf.ch)
Application Deadline: 30.10.2019. 23:59

DCAF-Sub-Saharan Africa (SSAD) are looking for an expert to produce a "Practical guide on the role of non-state actors of justice and security in the reform of the sector security in West Africa". The key objective of this is to provide practical guidance and advice on integrating non-state justice and security actors into SSR/G processes in a West African context while adhering by existing AU and ECOWAS normative frameworks.

The bid that meets all the evaluation criteria and has the best quality / price ratio will be selected for award of the contract. Any offer that does not meet the requirements will be rejected.

For more information and application for this consultancy, please follow the link. 

Vacancy

Conseiller(ère) Technique National(e) RSS (Poste national)

Location: Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Period: 01.11.2019. to Indefinite
Application Contact: (africa.programme@dcaf.ch)
Application Deadline: 18.10.2019. 12:00

En étroite collaboration avec le/la Chargé.e de Projet, le/la titulaire du poste, de nationalité burkinabaise, aura pour principales missions d’assurer la bonne implantation du DCAF au Burkina Faso et de contribuer à la planification, préparation et réalisation des activités du programme, avec les interlocuteurs nationaux pertinents (Ministères, Parlement, Forces de sécurité, Société Civile,…) ainsi qu’avec l’Autorité de Développement Intégré de la Région du Liptako Gourma.

Pour postuler à l'offre Conseiller(ère) Technique National(e) RSS  (Poste national), veuillez suivre le lien.

Vacancy

Chargé(e) de Projet pour le Burkina Faso

Location: Bamako, Mali
Period: 01.11.2019. to Indefinite
Application Contact: (africa.programme@dcaf.ch)
Application Deadline: 18.10.2019. 12:00

Sous la supervision de la cheffe de la division Afrique Subsaharienne, et en collaboration avec un Conseiller National RSS au Burkina Faso, le/la titulaire du poste aura pour principales missions de représenter DCAF au Burkina Faso et de piloter la mise en œuvre du programme dans son volet relatif au Burkina Faso. Il/elle sera initialement rattaché.e au bureau régional de DCAF au Mali (Bamako).

Pour postuler à l'offre Chargé(e) de Projet pour le Burkina Faso, veuillez suivre le lien.

Vacancy

Consultancy – Institutional Needs Analysis and Mapping of External Cooperation for the National Police of Honduras

Location: Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Application Deadline: 06.10.2019. 23:59

DCAF Latin America and the Carribbean unit are looking for a Qualified Consultant or Firm to carry out an Institutional Needs Analysis and Mapping of External Cooperation for The National Police Of Honduras. 

The long-term goal of the required consultancy is to develop mechanisms to effectively and efficiently channel the resources and support of external cooperation towards the actual requirements of the NPH. The findings of the consultancy should serve as a starting point for the NPH to build a system that provides for a better planning, prioritization, allocation, management, monitoring and evaluation of resources, particularly the external ones, based on institutional needs.

The specific objectives of the consultancy are the following:

  1. Identify the needs of reform, transformation, and adjustment that the NPH must address in order to implement the modernization process and to reinforce the national community policing model.
  2. Map and analyse the external cooperation offer to the NPH (national and international).
  3. Identify gaps between the institutional requirements and the current resources, institutional capacity, and external support.
  4. Provide recommendations to design a Modernization Plan for the NPH. 

The consultant should have a minimum relevant professional track record of at least 10 years in institutional assessment exercises, including needs and gap analysis, preferably in the security sector.

For further details about this consultancy, kindly follow the link. 

Vacancy

Consultoría – Sistema Integral de Gestión y Control de Riesgos para la Policía Nacional de Honduras

Location: Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Application Deadline: 06.10.2019. 23:59

DCAF Latin America and the Caribbean unit is looking for a consultancy to conduct Comprehensive Risk Management and Control System for the National Police of Honduras(in Spanish). 

Consultor/A O Firma Especializada para El Desarrollo de Un Sistema Integral de Gestión y Control de Riesgos Para Ser Implementado Por la Inspectoría General de la Policía Nacional de Honduras.

El objetivo general de la consultoría consiste en desarrollar un sistema de gestión y control de riesgos que pueda ser implementado por la Inspectoría General de la Policía Nacional de Honduras en sus labores de control interno.

Los objetivos específicos son los siguientes:

  1. Desarrollar un sistema integral para la gestión y control de riesgos, que incluya un conjunto de políticas, principios, normas, manuales, procedimientos, mecanismos de prevención, instructivos, indicadores, entre otros insumos relevantes, para una adecuada gestión de riesgos; y que permita a la Inspectoría General realizar un monitoreo a través de una herramienta informática (es importante que el sistema cuente con soporte documental e informático).
  2. Brindar asistencia técnica al personal de la Inspectoría General en la implementación del sistema de gestión y control de riesgos desarrollado.
  3. Definir los parámetros y mecanismos idóneos para contar con una certificación de los conocimientos del personal de la PNH.
  4. Capacitar al personal de la Inspectoría General en la gestión y control de riesgos, en base al sistema desarrollado.

El candidato debe tener un mínimo de 8 años de experiencia en gestión integral de riesgos con base en estándares internacionales y buenas prácticas.

Para más información sobre por esta consultoría, siga en enlace. 

Vacancy

Consultoría - Plan de Comunicación Estratégica para la Policía Nacional de Honduras

Location: Tegucigalpa - Wikipedia, Honduras
Application Deadline: 06.10.2019. 23:59

DCAF Latin America and the Caribbean unit is looking for a consultancy to work Strategic Communication Plan for the National Police of Honduras (in Spanish). 

Consultor/a o firma especializada para la elaboración de un Plan de Comunicación Estratégica para la Dirección de Asuntos Disciplinarios Policiales de la Policía Nacional de Honduras.

 

El objetivo general de la consultoría consiste en la creación de un Plan de Comunicación Estratégica, Integral y Efectiva para la DIDADPOL, que recoja las políticas, principios, estrategias, objetivos, recursos, propuestas, y acciones de comunicación flexibles y adaptables, tanto internas como externas.

Dicho plan tendrá que estar alineado con los procesos institucionales que se engloban en el Plan Estratégico Institucional de modo tal que permita: mejorar la coordinación, ayudar a organizar los procesos de comunicación, guiar el trabajo comunicativo asertivo, evitar la dispersión, y facilitar el ingreso, acceso y salida de la información. Todo lo cual debe redundar en el mejoramiento de la eficacia y eficiencia institucional.

El candidato debe tener un mínimo de 10 años de experiencia en el desarrollo de planes o estrategias de comunicación organizacional, de preferencia en el campo de seguridad.

Para más información sobre por esta consultoría, siga en enlace. 

Vacancy

Convocatoria Para Presentar Propuestas - Análisis de Necesidades Institucionales y Mapeo de Cooperación Externa Para la Policía Nacional de Honduras

Location: Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Application Deadline: 06.10.2019. 23:59

DCAF Latin America and the Caribbean unit is looking for a consultancy to work analyse institutional needs and mapping of external  cooperation for the National Police of Honduras (in Spanish). 

 

El objetivo general de la consultoría es desarrollar los mecanismos para orientar de manera efectiva y eficiente el apoyo de la cooperación externa hacia los requerimientos actuales de la PNH. Los hallazgos de la consultoría deben servir como base para que la PNH construya un sistema de planeación, priorización, canalización, gestión, seguimiento y evaluación de recursos, particularmente externos, en función de sus necesidades institucionales.

Los objetivos específicos son los siguientes:

1. Identificar necesidades de reforma, transformación o modificación dentro de la PNH, que deban ser atendidas para implementar un proceso de modernización y consolidar un modelo nacional de policía comunitaria.

2. Realizar un mapeo y análisis de la oferta de cooperación externa (nacional e internacional) a la PNH.

3. Identificar las brechas entre las necesidades institucionales y los recursos actuales, la capacidad institucional y la oferta de cooperación externa-

4. Formular recomendaciones para diseñar el Plan de Modernización de la PNH.

El candidato debe tener un mínimo de 10 años de experiencia laboral en ejercicios de análisis institucional, incluida la identificación y análisis de necesidades institucionales y análisis de brechas, preferiblemente en el sector de la seguridad.

Para más información sobre por esta consultoría, siga en enlace. 

Vacancy

International Expert – Complaints Systems

Location: Ramallah, Palestinian Territories
Application Deadline: 04.10.2019. 23:59

DCAF is currently preparing for the implementation of the project under the DFID funded Capability, Accountability, Sustainability and Inclusivity Programme (CASIP) aimed at providing support to the Palestinian Security Sector. The CASIP will deliver improved financial and human resources management, policy-making capability, a more effective security sector complaints handling system, and increased internal accountability of Palestinian Authority Security Forces (PASF).

For this project, DCAF is looking for an International Expert on Complaints Systems to be based in Ramallah. 

For more information about the vacancy as International Expert on Complaints System, please follow the link. 

Vacancy

International Expert – Human Resources

Location: Ramallah, Palestinian Territories
Application Deadline: 04.10.2019. 23:59

DCAF is currently preparing for the implementation of the project under the DFID funded Capability, Accountability, Sustainability and Inclusivity Programme (CASIP) aimed at providing support to the Palestinian Security Sector. The CASIP will deliver improved financial and human resources management, policy-making capability, a more effective security sector complaints handling system, and increased internal accountability of Palestinian Authority Security Forces (PASF).

For this project, DCAF is looking for an International Expert in Human Resources to be based in Ramallah. 

For more information about the vacancy as International Expert on Human Resources, please follow the link. 

Vacancy

International Expert – Public Financial Management

Location: Ramallah, Palestinian Territories
Application Deadline: 04.10.2019. 23:59

DCAF is currently preparing for the implementation of the project under the DFID funded Capability, Accountability, Sustainability and Inclusivity Programme (CASIP) aimed at providing support to the Palestinian Security Sector. The CASIP will deliver improved financial and human resources management, policy-making capability, a more effective security sector complaints handling system, and increased internal accountability of Palestinian Authority Security Forces (PASF).

For this project, DCAF is looking for an International Expert in Public Financial Management to be based in Ramallah.

For more information about the vacancy as International Expert - Public Financial Management, please follow the link. 

Vacancy

International Expert – Planning and M&E

Location: Ramallah, Palestinian Territories
Application Deadline: 04.10.2019. 23:59

DCAF is currently preparing for the implementation of the project under the DFID funded Capability, Accountability, Sustainability and Inclusivity Programme (CASIP) aimed at providing support to the Palestinian Security Sector. The CASIP will deliver improved financial and human resources management, policy-making capability, a more effective security sector complaints handling system, and increased internal accountability of Palestinian Authority Security Forces (PASF).

For this project, DCAF is looking for an International Expert in Planning and M&E to be based in Ramallah.

For full details about the vacancy as International Expert - Planning and M&E, please follow the link. 

Vacancy

Project Officer

Location: Geneva, Switzerland
Application Deadline: 20.09.2019. 23:59

DCAF's Business and Security Division are looking for their new Project Officer. 

The Business and Security Division works with business, governments and communities to improve security, sustainable development and respect for human rights. The division are a strategic implementing partner for both the Montreux Document and the International Code of Conduct for Private Security Service Providers (ICoC) and an Observer to the Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights (VPs). In partnership with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), the work supports companies operating in complex environments to ensure that human rights are integrated into their business practices. For more information, please see: www.businessandsecurity.dcaf.ch 

For full details about the vacancy as Project Officer, kindly follow the link. 

Vacancy

CASIP Programme Manager

Location: Ramallah, Palestinian Territories
Application Deadline: 22.09.2019. 23:59

DCAF - Geneva Centre for Security Sector Governance are looking for a Programme Manager.

DCAF is implementing the program “Capability, Accountability, Sustainability and Inclusivity Programme (CASIP)” of support to the Palestinian Security Sector, funded by the Department for International Development (DFID). CASIP aims to deliver improved financial and human resources management, policy-making capability, a more effective security sector complaints handling system, and increased internal accountability of Palestinian Authority Security Forces (PASF). The programme will support interventions in four identified thematic areas: strategic planning and research, public financial management, complaints and human resources.  Each contributes to the wider Administration Programme (AP) coordinated by the Ministry of the Interior on behalf of the Palestinian Security Forces.

The Programme Manager will be based in Ramallah and report to Head of Ramallah DCAF Office. 

For full details about the vacancy as CASIP Programme Manager, kindly follow the link. 

Vacancy

Project Assistant (50%)

Location: Geneva, Switzerland
Application Contact: (ECARecruitment@dcaf.ch)
Application Deadline: 10.09.2019. 12:00

The Project Assistant will be responsible for supporting the implementation of security sector governance capacity building projects. Under the supervision of the project coordinator and in close cooperation with other project team members in Geneva, and Belgrade, the Project Assistant is in charge of ensuring logistical and administrative tasks and carries out research on request.

For full details about the vacancy Project Assistant, kindly follow the link. 

Vacancy

Project Coordinator

Location: Geneva, Switzerland
Application Deadline: 08.09.2019. 23:59

DCAF's Business and Security Division are looking for a Project Coordinator. The Project Coordinator will play an active role in the planning, implementation and monitoring of policy research and operational programmes that address security and human rights challenges in complex environments. Central to this role is leading DCAF’s work on the topic conducted in partnership with the International Committee of the Red Cross.

For full details about the vacancy as Project Coordinator, kindly follow the link. 

Vacancy

Project officer / Middle East and North Africa Division

Location: Tunis, Tunisia
Period: 01.10.2019. to Indefinite
Application Contact: (menarecruitment@dcaf.ch)
Application Deadline: 30.08.2019. 12:00

DCAF’s Middle East and North Africa Division is looking for an experienced, motivated and dynamic individual to serve as Project Officer in Tunis office (100%). The Project Officer will be part of a professional team in Tunis and will report to the Head and Deputy Head of the DCAF Tunis office. 

For full details about the vacancy Project officer / Middle East and North Africa Division, kindly follow the link. 

Vacancy

Project Officer - Gender and Security Division

Location: Geneva, Switzerland
Application Deadline: 31.08.2019. 23:59

DCAF's Gender and Security division are looking for a Project Officer. 

With an eleven-person team, the Gender and Security Division leads DCAF’s work promoting gender equality by providing policy advice, conducting practical research and implementing operational projects.

Under the supervision of the Programme Manager, the candidate will support the development, implementation, and monitoring of complex research projects for the Division and work collaboratively with other DCAF divisions. This position requires knowledge and familiarity with gender and security, experience in applied research, strong interpersonal skills, and good understanding of security policy.

For full details about the vacancy Project Officer Gender and Security Division, kindly follow the link. 

Vacancy

Project Officer, DCAF Europe and Central Asia Division

Location: Geneva, Switzerland
Application Deadline: 23.08.2019. 23:59

DCAF Euopa and Central Asia Division are looking for a Project Officer. 

The Project Officer will be assigned to the DCAF’s Europe and Central Asia Division, and reporting directly to the Head of Police Programme. The candidate will be supporting DCAF in the implementation the Police Assistance Project on Strategic Reform Capacities for the National Police of Ukraine (PSRC-NPU). The project aims at supporting and institutionalizing strategic management and reform capacities at NPU and is part of a wider assistance Programme of Global Affairs Canada (GAC), Peace and Stabilization Operations Program (PSOPs) in Ukraine. The candidate will support the projects implementation, monitor and review while based at DCAF Geneva headquarters.

For full details about the vacancy as Project Officer at DCAF Europe and Central Asia Divison, kindly follow the link. 

Vacancy

Head, Gender and Security Division (100 %)

Location: Geneve, Switzerland
Application Deadline: 10.09.2019. 23:59

DCAF is currently seeking an experienced, dynamic, and creative leader to serve as Head of the Gender and Security Division. The candidate will set the vision and provide strategic management and oversight of the Gender and Security Division’s diverse operational and policy and research portfolio related to gender equality in security sector governance and reform. As the Head of division, the candidate will lead a highly professional, 10-member team in Geneva with a wide-ranging portfolio of Projects including policy development and advocacy, provision of technical advice, developing research products, supporting local partners, delivering training, etc. 

This position requires extensive knowledge and expertise in gender and security, hands-on leadership and interpersonal skills, as well as a deep understanding of relevant policy development on gender and security in multinational institutions, particularly the UN, EU, and OSCE. The post requires travel to different regions of the world and frequent engagements as a public speaker.

For full details about the vacancy as Head of Gender and Security Division at DCAF, kindly follow the link. 

Vacancy

International Expert – Regulation on Receiving Gifts and Regulation on Conflict of Interests

Location: Home-based,
Period: 01.09.2019. to Indefinite
Application Contact: (opmena@dcaf.ch)
Application Deadline: 12.08.2019. 23:00

DCAF’s Middle East and North Africa Division are looking for an International Expert under the project ‘Enhancing delivery of security and justice for the Palestinians’ in Occupied Palestinian Territories. 

The mandate consists of:

  • Commenting on the regulation of receiving gifts (home based).
  • Participating through video conference in a workshop on receiving gifts (to provide international experience in the regulations on receiving gifts and their implementation).
  • Participation in a conference on the regulation on conflict of interests, with providing presentation on the best practices and success stories on the regulation on conflict of interests (the activity is in Ramallah). 

For full details about the consultancy, Regulation on receiving gifts and regulation on conflict of interests, please follow the link

Vacancy

International Expert – Head of Office

Location: Kiev, Ukraine
Period: 01.10.2019. to Indefinite
Application Contact: (ECARecruitment@dcaf.ch)
Application Deadline: 23.08.2019. 12:00

DCAF Europe and Central Asia Division are looking for a dynamic and highly qualified International Expert as the new Head of Office in Kiev.

The candidate will be supporting DCAF in the implementation the Police Assistance Project on Strategic Reform Capacities for the National Police of Ukraine (PSRC-NPU). The project aims at supporting and institutionalizing strategic management and reform capacities at NPU and is part of a wider assistance Programme of Global Affairs Canada (GAC), Peace and Stabilization Operations Program (PSOPs) in Ukraine. The candidate will support in the PSRC-NPU’s implementation, monitor and review while based at DCAF office in Kiev – Ukraine.

For full details about the vacancy, International Expert – Head of Office, please follow the link

Vacancy

Project Coordinator

Location: Geneva, Switzerland
Application Deadline: 31.07.2019. 23:59

The Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces (DCAF) is dedicated to improving the security of states and their people within a framework of democratic governance, the rule of law, and respect for human rights. DCAF contributes to making peace and development more sustainable by assisting partner states and international actors supporting these states, to improve the governance of their security sector through inclusive and participatory reforms.

For the Europe and Central Asia Division, DCAF is looking for a dynamic and highly qualified expert to be the next Project Coordinator for a materinty replacement.

For full details about the vacancy, Project Coordinator, please follow the link

Vacancy

Interim Team Leader

Location: Ramallah, Palestinian Territories
Period: 22.07.2019. to Indefinite
Application Deadline: 16.07.2019. 23:00

DCAF is launching the implementation phase of its “Capability, Accountability, Sustainability and Inclusivity Programme (CASIP)” of support to the Palestinian Security Sector, funded by the UK. CASIP will deliver improved financial and human resources management, policy-making capability, a more effective security sector complaints handling system, and increased internal accountability of Palestinian Authority Security Forces (PASF). The Outcome of this project is: “A more capable, accountable, sustainable and inclusive PA security sector; and improved, more inclusive PA legitimacy and ability to govern.”  Under the outcome, the programme will support interventions in four identified thematic areas: strategic planning and research, public financial management, complaints and human resources.  Each contributes to the wider Administration Programme (AP) coordinated by the Ministry of the Interior on behalf of the Palestinian Security Forces.

Subject to final approval of the CASIP programme implementation phase by the donor, DCAF is willing to engage the services of an expert consultant to serve as Interim Team Leader for the CASIP programme, for a three-month period. Interested expired are called to express their interest. 

For full access to the vacancy, Interim Team Leader, kindly follow the link

Vacancy

Project Officer Lebanon

Location: Beirut, Lebanon
Application Deadline: 15.07.2019. 23:59

Geneva Centre for Security Sector Governance - (DCAF)'s Middle East and North Africa Division is looking for a Project Officer based in Beirut, Lebanon.
The Project Officer is responsible for supporting the implementation of DCAF's projects and activities in Lebanon. 

For full access to the vacancy, DCAF Project Officer Lebanon, kindly follow the link.

Vacancy

Project Officer

Location: Geneva, Switzerland
Application Deadline: 12.07.2019. 23:59

DCAF – Geneva Centre for Security Sector Governance, is looking for a motivated and flexible Project Officer to the Policy and Research Division. 
The Project Officer will support the Policy and Research Division in implementing research projects related to multilateral organisations, with a focus, among others, on the UN and the OSCE.

For full details about the vacancy, Project Officer at DCAF, please follow the link

Vacancy

Project coordinator (80%) – Latin America and the Caribbean Unit

Location: Geneva, Switzerland
Application Contact: ( dcaf.lac@dcaf.ch)
Application Deadline: 04.07.2019. 12:00

DCAF’s Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) Unit strives to strengthen citizen security in the LAC region by promoting the application of good governance principles. For our LAC Unit we are looking for a dynamic and highly motivated individual to be our Project Coordinator, Gender and Security LAC (80%). Under the direct supervision of the Head of the LAC Unit the Project Coordinator will be responsible for the project management of the Unit’s gender and security project in Colombia.  Additionally, as the focal point for gender within the Unit, the Project Coordinator will provide support to the gender components of all other projects of the Unit and assist the Unit in enhancing its capacities and strategies in matters of gender and security.

For full access to the vacancy, Project Coordinator, Gender and Security LAC, kindly follow the link. 

Vacancy

DCAF-ISSAT Deputy Head

Location: Geneva, Switzerland
Period: 01.07.2019. to Indefinite
Application Contact: (ISSATrecruitment@dcaf.ch)
Application Deadline: 29.04.2019. 00:00

DCAF is dedicated to improving the security of states and their people within a framework of democratic governance, the rule of law, and respect for human rights. DCAF contributes to making peace and development more sustainable by assisting partner states and international actors supporting these states, to improve the governance of their security sector through inclusive and participatory reforms. It creates innovative knowledge products, promotes norms and good practices, provides legal and policy advice and supports capacity‐building of both state and non‐state security sector stakeholders.

DCAF's Foundation Council comprises 62 member states, the Canton of Geneva and six permanent observers. Active in over 70 countries, DCAF is internationally recognized as one of the world's leading centres of excellence for security sector governance (SSG) and security sector reform (SSR). DCAF is guided by the principles of neutrality, impartiality, local ownership, inclusive participation, and gender equality. For more information please visit www.dcaf.ch

ISSAT is a Department of DCAF it was established in 2008 in response to the need to increase the capacity of the international community to support Security Sector Governance/Reform (SSG/R) processes, to enhance the effectiveness and quality of SSG/R programming, and to facilitate the coordination and coherence of international assistance for nationally driven SSR/G processes. It provides practical support to the international community in its efforts to improve security and justice, primarily in conflict-affected and fragile states. It does this by working with a group of member states and institutions to develop and promote good security and justice reform practices and principles, and by helping its members to build their capacity to support national and regional security and justice reform processes. The ISSAT provides a deployable capacity to support its Governing Board Members. For more information, please see: www.issat.dcaf.ch

 

We are looking for a motivated and experienced individual for the role of:

Deputy Head of ISSAT – (100 %)

Location:  Geneva (with regular travel)

Starting date: 1 July 2019 or upon mutual agreement

Duration: unlimited

The role    

The successful applicant will play a key role, with the Head of ISSAT, in managing the Department’s programmes and providing oversight to the department’s staff. The position will also involve representational duties. Part of a professional team in Geneva, the Deputy Head will contribute to strengthening the Department’s  work while promoting regional and national implementation of applicable international norms and good practices.

Key activities:

  • Provide management oversight to departmental work programmes
  • Ensure the effective and efficient implementation of ISSAT’s matrix system through coordination of ISSAT’s human resources  
  • Ensure effective supervision and mentoring support to staff within the Department
  • Represent the Department both within DCAF and with external stakeholders
  • Enable continuous improvement in departmental programme and human resource management processes
  • Lead planning, implementation and management of assigned projects, including deployment to field locations
  • Identify opportunities to develop new projects, build partnerships and expand the donor base for the Department’s work

YOUR EXPERIENCE

Essential:

  • The post holder must be a proactive person with strong leadership skills and have demonstrated an ability to work as part of a multi-cultural, multi-disciplinary team.
  • S/he must have extensive management experience and be prepared to represent the Head of ISSAT in official functions or as required, and to act as the lead for particular field activities.
  • S/he must have experience working in politically sensitive situations and have strong diplomatic skills, with strong experience of working with bilateral donors and multilateral actors supporting SSR/G processes.
  • S/he must have good communication (verbal and written), drafting and presentational skills, and the ability to network and liaise effectively with a wide range of potential stakeholders at all levels both within governments and non-governmental and multinational organisations.
  •  S/he must have outstanding management, organisational and planning skills and have the ability to analyse situations quickly, handle effectively multiple tasks without compromising quality, team spirit and positive working relationships, and to adapt to rapidly changing circumstances and produce workable solutions to meet customer requirements.

Additional skills or experience:

  • Advanced degree in political science/ international relations, economics, business, international human rights or humanitarian law, or related field;
  • Fluency in English and French, both written and spoken, is highly desirable. Additional languages considered a plus;
  • Swiss or EU citizenship or a valid work permit for Switzerland at the time of application is a pre-requisite.

We offer:

  • a rewarding, dynamic and challenging work experience
  • the chance to be part of a multicultural team of supportive, hardworking and values-driven people
  • the chance to contribute to improving security of states and their people within a framework of democratic governance, the rule of law, and respect for human rights.

If you think you are a good match for DCAF and the position advertised, please send your application to ISSATrecruitment@dcaf.ch by 29th April 2019 with the subject heading “Deputy Head of ISSAT”, enclosing:

  • a one-page motivational statement in English describing your relevant experience and what you can bring to ISSAT
  • a concise CV (maximum two pages)

DCAF is committed to equality of opportunity and encourages applications from all qualified candidates regardless of sex, age, disability, gender identity, religion, or ethnicity.

Vacancy

DCAF-ISSAT Project Assistant (Knowledge and Outreach)

Location: Geneva, Switzerland
Application Contact: (ISSATrecruitment@dcaf.ch)
Application Deadline: 28.03.2019. 17:00

DCAF’s International Security Sector Advisory Team (ISSAT) provides practical support to the international community in its efforts to improve security and justice, primarily in conflict-affected and fragile states. Established in 2008, it works to increase the capacity of the international community to support SSR processes, to enhance the effectiveness and quality of SSR programming, and to facilitate the coordination and coherence of international assistance for nationally driven SSR processes.

 

We are a dynamic team working with, and across, world-leading government departments, multilateral institutions and experts in the international security and justice sector development arena.

 

You will compliment an experienced, values-driven professional group from a broad variety of backgrounds. Funded chiefly by national governments, we look after our staff and ensure they benefit from a solid employment package, and a proactive and empowering working environment.

Today, DCAF-ISSAT is looking for a dynamic and committed individual to be our next:

DCAF-ISSAT Project Assistant

Tasks & Responsibilities:

Under the direction and coordination of the Head of Knowledge and Outreach and ISSAT’s Deputy Head, the post-holder will support the work of DCAF/ ISSAT’s Advocacy & Outreach service line. 

For the terms of reference and information on how to apply, kindly consult the attached PDF document. 

Vacancy

Head of Professional Development and Training (Advisor)

Location: Geneva, Switzerland
Application Contact: (ISSATrecruitment@dcaf.ch)
Application Deadline: 14.01.2019. 23:59

Reporting to Head of ISSAT (with delegation depending on the task), the Head of Professional Development and Training (an advisor level position) will have the following key areas of operation:

• Oversee the portfolio of ISSAT’s current trainings in supporting security and justice reform, and identify and assess future professional development, learning and training needs of the globally deployed SSR practitioners from ISSAT’s bilateral and multilateral Governing Board Members;

• Develop professional and learning development pathways and curriculum for SSR practitioners, which may include training modules as well as other learning, coaching and mentoring opportunities, ensuring that such pathways are designed and assured in line with international best practices, and that they address the goals and expectations of ISSAT strategic and development objectives;

• Seek opportunities for achieving ISSAT strategic and development goals through development and improvement of ISSAT peer-learning, training, coaching and mentoring programmes or courses;

• Deploy and advise on a wide variety of development, learning, and training pathways that understand how to move from blended courses at the individual level to the institutionalisation of career and development paths;

• Quality assure ISSAT’s professional development and training/learning material, approaches and facilitators;

• Lead the provision of assistance to ISSAT’s Governing Board Members in developing their policies for SSR training and professional development;

• Contribute to ISSAT’s development and dissemination of knowledge products based on good practice and lessons identified from the field;

• Build and maintain effective liaison with ISSAT’s Governing Board Members, the wider SSR community, and other actors working on linked thematic areas;

• Input to ISSAT strategic planning and prioritisation, as part of the ISSAT Management Team.

• Given that ISSAT works in a matrix approach, the post holder will also get opportunities for additional advisory field support work and be expected to contribute to ISSAT’s knowledge portfolio.

You

• Over 7 years relevant experience in training and learning development, as well as in conflict and development practice in the field;
• Significant knowledge and experience in one or more of the following: governance mechanisms, conflict and peace development, human resourcing, public financial management;
• Significant knowledge and experience in: training needs assessments, blended training and learning development design, monitoring and evaluation of learning and professional development, coordination;
• Programme and project management skills, and experience in Learning Management Systems (LMS);
• Good communication (verbal and written), influencing, training, presentation, coaching and mentoring skills;
• Recognised training qualification (Chartered Institute of Professional Development (CIPD) or equivalent);
• Able to analyse situations quickly and effectively, adapt to rapidly changing circumstances and produce workable solutions to meet customer requirements;
• Masters degree in conflict studies, international relations, management and international development, political science, or a related field;
• Fluency in English and French. Other languages desirable (particularly Spanish, Arabic and Portuguese);
• Swiss or EU citizenship, or a valid work permit for Switzerland at the time of application is a pre-requisite.

We offer:

• a rewarding, dynamic and challenging work experience
• the chance to be part of a multicultural team of supportive, hardworking and values-driven people
• the chance to contribute to a securer world
If you think you are a good match for DCAF and the position advertised, please send your application to ISSATrecruitment@dcaf.ch by 14 January 2019 with the subject heading “APPLICATION Head PDT”, enclosing:
• a one-page motivational statement in English describing your story and what you can bring to DCAF
• a concise CV (maximum two pages)
DCAF is an equal opportunities employer that considers applications from all qualified candidates.

Vacancy

Head of Professional Development and Training (Advisor)

Location: Geneva, Switzerland
Application Contact: (ISSATrecruitment@dcaf.ch)
Application Deadline: 14.01.2019. 17:00

Reporting to Head of ISSAT (with delegation depending on the task), the Head of Professional Development and Training (an advisor level position) will have the following key areas of operation:

• Oversee the portfolio of ISSAT’s current trainings in supporting security and justice reform, and identify and assess future professional development, learning and training needs of the globally deployed SSR practitioners from ISSAT’s bilateral and multilateral Governing Board Members;

• Develop professional and learning development pathways and curriculum for SSR practitioners, which may include training modules as well as other learning, coaching and mentoring opportunities, ensuring that such pathways are designed and assured in line with international best practices, and that they address the goals and expectations of ISSAT strategic and development objectives;

• Seek opportunities for achieving ISSAT strategic and development goals through development and improvement of ISSAT peer-learning, training, coaching and mentoring programmes or courses;

• Deploy and advise on a wide variety of development, learning, and training pathways that understand how to move from blended courses at the individual level to the institutionalisation of career and development paths;

• Quality assure ISSAT’s professional development and training/learning material, approaches and facilitators;

• Lead the provision of assistance to ISSAT’s Governing Board Members in developing their policies for SSR training and professional development;

• Contribute to ISSAT’s development and dissemination of knowledge products based on good practice and lessons identified from the field;

• Build and maintain effective liaison with ISSAT’s Governing Board Members, the wider SSR community, and other actors working on linked thematic areas;

• Input to ISSAT strategic planning and prioritisation, as part of the ISSAT Management Team.

• Given that ISSAT works in a matrix approach, the post holder will also get opportunities for additional advisory field support work and be expected to contribute to ISSAT’s knowledge portfolio.

You

• Over 7 years relevant experience in training and learning development, as well as in conflict and development practice in the field;
• Significant knowledge and experience in one or more of the following: governance mechanisms, conflict and peace development, human resourcing, public financial management;
• Significant knowledge and experience in: training needs assessments, blended training and learning development design, monitoring and evaluation of learning and professional development, coordination;
• Programme and project management skills, and experience in Learning Management Systems (LMS);
• Good communication (verbal and written), influencing, training, presentation, coaching and mentoring skills;
• Recognised training qualification (Chartered Institute of Professional Development (CIPD) or equivalent);
• Able to analyse situations quickly and effectively, adapt to rapidly changing circumstances and produce workable solutions to meet customer requirements;
• Masters degree in conflict studies, international relations, management and international development, political science, or a related field;
• Fluency in English and French. Other languages desirable (particularly Spanish, Arabic and Portuguese);
• Swiss or EU citizenship, or a valid work permit for Switzerland at the time of application is a pre-requisite.

We offer:

• a rewarding, dynamic and challenging work experience
• the chance to be part of a multicultural team of supportive, hardworking and values-driven people
• the chance to contribute to a securer world
If you think you are a good match for DCAF and the position advertised, please send your application to ISSATrecruitment@dcaf.ch by 14 January 2019 with the subject heading “APPLICATION Head PDT”, enclosing:
• a one-page motivational statement in English describing your story and what you can bring to DCAF
• a concise CV (maximum two pages)
DCAF is an equal opportunities employer that considers applications from all qualified candidates.

Vacancy

Case Studies

Mainstreaming Gender in the framework of the Nepal Justice Sector Assessment (Norwegian mandate)

Norway mandated ISSAT to map an overview of the Nepalese population’s emerging needs and identification of possible areas for future programmatic support related to justice sector reform.

From conception, the mandate strived to incorporate gender perspectives into the methodology by creating a diverse team of experts with profiles that were able to reflect upon the full spectrum of security and justice challenges.  This meant that the team did not select female or male members so as to create a gender-balanced team, but instead prioritising the knowledge of each expert. Hence, the ISSAT team included a regional expert, who had previous in-depth knowledge and understanding of governance, security, and justice issues in Nepal, as well as two further experts who were able to capture links between gender and the sector areas or issues being dealt with, in the aim to promote gender equality whether in developing policy or initiatives in specific institutions. 

The mandate focused on the identification of the institutional gaps stemming from unmet needs of some of the most vulnerable individuals/groups. For example, cognisant of the endemic level of gender-based violence in Nepal, the team engaged ten local organisations that specifically worked on gender-related abuses to guide in the data collection. The team further articulated in its methodology, the need for institutions to become more responsive to the security and justice needs of women/girls by enabling more access and providing more inclusive approaches to gaining access.

The methodology employed the collection of sex-disaggregated information to capture the specific gender-related vulnerabilities, gaps and issues. To provide recommendations conducive to the goal of reaching a basic level of justice provision, the team took into account the diverse needs of the population by using a methodology aimed to mainstreamgender perspectives throughout the mandate as part of a set of critical core issues. For example, to ensure that the assessment process was gender sensitive, the ISSAT team mainstreamed gender via key questions relevant to some of the most vulnerable groups, and integrated sex-disaggregated data collection in order to create an evidence base. In addition, the mandate’s Terms of Reference articulated the requirement of an Options Paper, so as to gain a clearer analysis on specific issues that relate to gender.  For example, for many women, marginalised communities and children, social barriers remain the primary obstacle preventing access to justice. The social barriers differ substantially amongst ethnic groups and can range from lack of economic empowerment, traditional values, or even established practice at community level.

Understanding that substantive progress in security and justice reform will likely be a determining factor in the extent to which the Government of Nepal will be able to achieve meaningful and sustainable progress across all Sustainable Development Goals beyond just Goal 16, the team presented the crucial link to gender equality (goal 5). Therefore, the report reiterates incorporating a gendered analysis across all sections.

Proposed takeaways:

  1. There is a proved benefit to engaging with local partners to identify the most vulnerable and marginalised groups and disaggregating justice needs based on age, ethnicity, geographic location etc. 
  2. The inclusion of professionals with relevant diverse expertise who have a cross-cutting gender lens, played a critical role in determining and capturing clear linkages between gender and broader issues such as access to justice, and gender-related threats such as human trafficking and modern day slavery (to name a few) which disproportionately impact vulnerable and marginalized groups, and significantly children, women, and members of lower caste who are more at risk.
  3. The added value of providing an Options Paper as one of the outputs, specifically targeting gender equality, ensures that gender is a core issue with complex characteristics (encompassing class, race, religious affiliation and poverty levels) and thus needs to be addressed consistently to promote more gender responsive and inclusive security and justice institutions.
Case Study

Gender Mainstreaming Case Example: Training Curriculum Development – SSR Contribution to Preventing and Countering Violent Extremism (P/CVE)

In 2018, Denmark, France, the Netherlands, Norway and Switzerland mandated ISSAT to develop a course on the “Contribution of SSR to Preventing and Countering Violent Extremism” (SSR-VE). The objective of the mandate was to create a 5-day course that included a strong component on the prevention of violent extremism (VE) and that covered dimensions related to human security, governance and engagement of local communities. The courses were later piloted in Bamako, Mali and in the Hague, Netherlands.

From the onset, ISSAT adopted a gender-sensitive approach to course development and delivery, given the significant link this thematic area has with community security and its relevance to the safety and livelihoods of men, women, boys and girls

Entry points for Gender Equality

Gender references in the course’s founding documents

The course’s terms of reference set explicit gender equality commitments for the course. The course design paper emphasised that Gender related considerations will be mainstreamed throughout the Programme. It focused on presenting evidence-based experiences reflecting the critical importance of gender sensitive analysis in addressing the unique needs of local communities, the challenges of injustice and marginalisation on different segments of society”.

Anchoring gender equality considerations in the course’s vision and founding documents not only provided a common understanding of the importance of gender equality and SSR but also ensured that this aspect was mainstreamed throughout the course material. It also enabled the course facilitators to be more committed to the need for greater focus on gender equality within their individual sessions.

Gender parity among course team and participants

ISSAT invested considerable efforts in aiming for equal representation within the training team. The curriculum development team, as well as the facilitation teams had equal representation between men and women.

The main challenge remained in ensuring gender parity amongst training participants, an area where ISSAT has the lowest margin for impact. In spite of its active follow-up to include women participants, at the first pilot session in Bamako, only 3 women (14%) attended the course, as a direct result of low numbers of female applicants. The second pilot session in the Hague, women’s participation rate was higher, at 47%.

A comparative analysis of both training sessions highlights the importance of gender parity for more representative, relevant and diversified discussions of security and justice reform related issues. It also fosters a stronger engagement by participants with regards to the course topics. 

Determining the level of gender equality awareness among participants

ISSAT determined the level gender equality awareness among training participants through participant applications analysis and pre-course questionnaires. Accordingly, ISSAT adapted course content to the participants needs. This step is of key importance in anchoring the training material in the trainees’ needs and in ensuring that the debate around gender equality matures from the introduction to basic themes and issues, towards more complex understanding of gender roles and implications on security and justice institutions’ effectives, accountability and legitimacy.

Content development

The SSR-VE course content development efforts sought to raise awareness on the importance of developing gender-sensitive SSR programmes that are based on gendered analysis of community security aspects and strive towards gender equality in access to services, as well as, in service delivery. It aimed to change the current focus of the SSR community which is predominantly on dealing with the recruitment of men and boys in extremist groups, and rebalance it towards the often-overlooked recruitment of women and girls and on the roles that they play in the community and in security institutions.

The two pilot courses also included a session on “confidence-building between citizens and uniformed forces” which included a focus on gender equality and human-rights based approaches. This session introduced a role-play session to illustrate that women, men, girls and boys have different experiences of (in)security and included exercises to discuss the roles of different groups in preventing violent extremism. In addition, the good practices of inclusivity and representativeness were extensively discussed in SSR thematic sessions on governance, criminal justice and policing. The key message conveyed in the framework of the SSR and governance session, was on the key role gender equality plays in strengthening the effectiveness, accountability, transparency and inclusiveness of security and justice institutions. During the criminal justice chain reform session, facilitators addressed the issue of access to justice and the exclusion of specific groups due to their cultural, gender, age or socio-economic backgrounds. The session on community engagement focused on the conditions for the community violence reduction (CVR), discussing how to empower men, women, boys and girls and promote social cohesion.

Course delivery

In the delivery of its two pilot courses, ISSAT recognises the importance of developing gender mainstreaming strategies that are culturally sensitive. Understanding the context in which the training was delivered was of primary importance to the facilitators. The course’s delivery approach was designed taking into consideration deep-rooted beliefs and gender sensitive values among participants. Course facilitators ensured that gender equality issues were addressed in a relevant manner to the local and regional contexts. For example, LGBTQ relevant issues were more easily addressed during the second pilot training in the Hague.

Recommendations

  • Set clear gender equality related outcomes, objectives and deliverables in the course’s founding documents. It helps secure team-wide commitment since the onset and ensure focus on this key policy priority throughout the design and delivery of the course.
  • Allocate sufficient time to explain and deconstruct the notions of gender, gender mainstreaming and gender equality. Often, participants have preconceived conceptions of what is meant by gender. Having an open discussion on what gender is, at the beginning of the course can help build a common understanding among participants and consequently enable a richer and more productive exchange during the sessions.  
  • Seek equal gender parity among training participants through proactively disseminating course applications among potentially relevant female participants. This can be particularly challenging, due to the low representation percentages of women in many security and justice institutions. The impact of diversity amongst training participants is very high on the level and quality of the discussions, as well as, on the strength of the message the course communicates on the organisation’s commitment to gender equality.
  • When gender parity is not achieved, facilitators should adopt alternative strategies to compensate for this gap. Such strategies could include the use of additional female facilitators or guest speakers, the establishment of ground rules that enable all participants to intervene without fear or intimidation, or the promotion of an open discussion among course participants on positive or negative gender-related experiences in their professional and/or personal lives.  
  • Establishing evidence or experience-based insights and examples prior to the course are key to the course’s success. Facilitators need to increasingly refer to existing research and evidence on gender dynamics and masculinities as related to the course’s topic. Cultural specificities related to gendered and social constructs within the geographical context of the course’s venue also need to be taken into consideration in order to maximise the training’s impact and to avoid cultural gaffes.

Case study published in January 2020. 

Case Study

Gender Mainstreaming Case Example of ISSAT’s mid-term evaluation of Swedish Police Project in Liberia

In 2018, the Swedish National Police (SNP) requested ISSAT to conduct a mid-term evaluation for its Police Cooperation project in Liberia. The project was implemented by the SNP between 2016 and 2019. The purpose of the project was to achieve improved quality of crime investigations including on Sexual and Gender Based Violence (SGBV), basic crime investigation, basic crime scene investigation and cooperation between the Liberian National Police (LNP) and the Prosecution Service in three police station areas.

The components of the project focused on addressing important challenges and needs as formulated by the LNP and prosecutors such as:

  • Training in basic crime investigations, basic crime scene investigations and investigations of SGBV crimes.
  • Guidelines to optimise the quality control of any crime investigation case forwarded to the Prosecution Service.
  • Basic forensic equipment.
  • Improved premises and facilities for one stop centres and comfort rooms for SGBV victims.  
  • Improved cooperation between police and prosecutors.
  • Public awareness raising.

ISSAT’s evaluation was one exercise in a series of engagements with the Swedish National Police. It built on previous lessons learned studies on police reform in Liberia and national policy documents. The evaluation included a 7-day mission to Liberia and visits to local police zones for direct observations at police station level. The mission also included semi-structured interviews with beneficiaries as well as SNP normally based in Stockholm.

 

Main Takeaways

The evaluation was carried out based on OECD-DAC criteria (relevance, efficiency, effectiveness, impact and sustainability) which is aligned with ISSAT’s methodological approach for evaluations. Guided by the terms of reference, ISSAT closely liaised with the project’s gender expert to understand and better integrate in the evaluation’s approach the main components of effective police investigations into sexual based crime and victim protection.

 

LESSON 1: Gender equality approaches need to be an explicit part of the evaluation methodology

Throughout the data gathering phase, ISSAT ensured consistent inquiry into the project’s gender sensitive approaches and strategies. Under each of the evaluation criteria, ISSAT looked at gender relevant issues and dimensions. The results of ISSAT’s evaluation found that SNP systematically promoted gender equality, and allocated resources for combatting sexual and gender-based violence crimes. This reflected Swedish commitment to this gender equality and combatting SGBV, through project strategies that promoted awareness-raising among local counterparts.

 

LESSON 2: Gender equality subject-matter expertise is essential for articulating project impact

The Swedish National Police included a gender expert as part of the project’s team. The gender expert on SGBV was not based in Liberia but deployed up to four times a year. Having a gender expert as part of the project further strengthened the quality of the project’s deliverables, as well as the communications capability for the project to create traction and ownership of its priorities amongst stakeholders. It increased focus on SGBV reporting, achievements and outcomes for Swedish National Police, as well as enabled greater synergies between the different work streams. 

 

LESSON 3: Build on what works at the local context

ISSAT’s evaluation demonstrated that the Swedish support project achieved positive results from its capacity building engagements on SGBV because it built on existing training material already used by the Liberian National Police and the UN Mission in Liberia. This method ensured that the project’s contribution was consistent with current skills and techniques used by LNP. The added value of the SNP was therefore to bring in practical implementation techniques addressing victims of SGBV. This made the trainings and practical elements relevant and grounded in a Liberian context rather than in a Swedish model, contributing directly to the success of the project.

 

LESSON 4: Comfort rooms are an effective protection measure if used appropriately

Another key output of the Swedish support project was the usage of comfort rooms where victims can report SGBV crimes. Comfort rooms require minimal maintenance costs if used in a consistent manner. ISSAT’s evaluation showed that it is important to establish guidelines and objectives for their usage to prevent improper, or unintended usage of the dedicated facilities. Moreover, comfort rooms need to be included in national regulations, operational documents and strategies in order to enable continuous monitoring and review of their usage by SGBV victims.

 

LESSON 5: Donor coordination on cross-cutting issues is crucial

ISSAT’s evaluation demonstrated that engagement in coordination activities ensures critical information gathering on primary needs when it comes to SGBV crime investigations and forensic evidence gathering. Active and close collaboration between donors and national stakeholders in the form of task forces or coordination groups strengthens the effectiveness and impact of donor efforts and programming. It also provides a platform to explore whether the project is on the right track and opens new channels to troubleshoot if and when the project faces resistance, blockages or challenges.

 

LESSON 6: Avoid revictimization during evaluation of SGBV programming

To safeguard and protect the victims of SGBV crimes, there is a need for rules and procedures to be put in place in the methodology in order to prevent “revictimization” of victims. Questions and discussions on the person’s prior traumatic experience and re-examination of details and actions that explain the incident and the police’s response could put the SGBV survivor at risk, as well as expose their family or community members to unintended consequences. Evaluation teams conducting impact or effectiveness reviews of a SGBV programs need to design their approach avoiding revictimizing the victims.

 

Lesson 7: Use awareness-raising campaigns as an outreach tool and not only for visibility

When awareness campaigns are used as a strategy for the project to achieve its objectives, it is important that these are used as outreach channels to raise awareness on SGBV rather than merely be project visibility tools. Such campaigns also enable continuous monitoring on SGBV issues and serve as powerful advocacy tools for national counterparts to their maintain focus on those crimes and combatting them. Projects that integrate empirical evidence of outcomes in their awareness campaigns tend to achieve higher levels of conviction and credibility, particularly on a complex and culturally charged subject area such as SGBV.

Case Study

The Creation of a Republican Police in Benin

Background and Introduction

Benin's development relies heavily on its ability to attract foreign investments and on tourism. In a West African region troubled by violent events, the country's security is therefore an essential condition to its future wealth. Benin's security and defence forces have been facing the traditional threats posed by serious and organised crime, road blockages and illegal exploitation of the sea for many years. The extension of terrorism from the Sahel into Benin is an emerging risk for the stability of the country. It became a reality on May 1st , 2019, with the assassination of a guide in the Pendjari Park and the kidnapping of French tourists near the border with Burkina Faso.

National security was already a key issue during the 2016 elections campaign. As new Head of State, Patrice Talon quickly expressed his vision for the transformation of the security sector in the Government Action Programme (GAP) 2016-2021 and the National Development Plan (NDP) 2018-2025. The documents set out the ambition to rationalise the public administration and the government’s architecture. The GAP lists eighteen sectoral projects aiming at strengthening public security and national defence, including, risk prevention, civil protection, integrated management of border areas and internal security.

The creation of a single internal security force under the supervision of the Ministry of the Interior and Public Security through merging the police and gendarmerie, was included as a potential measure to improve the security sector’s management. The operationalisation of this commitment came on the 1st of January 2018, when the creation of the "Republican Police" was announced. This major initiative, transforming Benin's security sector, only has one recent precedent, being the reform of Belgium's police initiated on the 1st of January 2001. Benin’s security apparatus is being redefined, as a result of the disappearance of those two very old structures, which contributed through their culture and traditions to its architecture and governance. The new structure now brings together some 10,000 police officers and is intended to be a hybrid of two organisations with different practices and understandings of internal security. 

In reality, regional instability and emerging security threats require Benin’s political authorities to implement an effective system for anticipation and response. The creation of the Republican Police is only the first step, and a new National Security Strategy is now expected in the first half of 2020. While the police-gendarmerie merger could define the reform’s outlook, it constitutes a major challenge for the country with foreseeable advantages and disadvantages on the structural and functional levels.

The Challenges of the Merger

Strategic Challenges

Fundamentally transforming the organisation of a security institution requires national security policies and strategies that identify priority objectives and the capabilities required to achieve them. Throughout 2017, the committee set up to prepare for the merger of the National Police and the National Gendarmerie has worked without a national security sector strategy or a national security policy. With no political or strategic guidance at its disposal, the committee based its work solely on the will of the Head of State.

Ideally, national authorities generally set the framework for security sector reform (SSR) through a security policy document and a transformation plan that reconciles aspirations and means. Experience shows that it is important that these key documents integrate internal security, defence and justice and are the product of a truly comprehensive and inclusive dialogue, resulting in a widely shared vision. The Head of State’ political will, while crucial to reform, is not sufficient on its own to set priorities and bridge the gap between divergent views on the technical aspects of a difficult transformation. The lack of long-term planning has also led to fears of an unpredictable process and a foreseeable difficulty for the State to meet costs not previously assessed.

Structural Challenges

The first structural challenge concerned the human resources and economies of scale that needed to be achieved as units and functions were streamlined into a single organisation, avoiding duplication. As a result of two hierarchical structures merging into a single structure, many officers found themselves without command responsibilities. The merger affected the employment of nearly three hundred officers. Some were placed at the disposal of the General Directorate of the Republican Police while others remained without operational assignments. To improve the situation of these officers and in order to avoid an excessive number of idle officers, a temporary solution was found by deploying several of them to peacekeeping operations under the umbrella of multilateral organisations.

On the positive side, the merger has improved security coverage by rationalising the distribution of security forces throughout the country. The density of the security network in Benin was insufficient by international standards, particularly in the border areas and in the north of the country where the risk of religious radicalisation is greater. Localities that used to have both a police station and gendarmerie barracks are now under the jurisdiction of a single police station, thus avoiding conflicts between bodies, ambiguity of responsibilities and wasted resources. The financial savings generated as a result of the merger have made it possible to set up units in localities where there was no police presence. In spite of the police-population ratio remaining unchanged, the security service has come closer to the population with nearly 85% of the territory being covered, compared to 55% before the merger.

Functional Challenges

The aim of the merger is to have an integrated internal security force, with a hybrid functioning system, retaining some aspects particular to the gendarmerie, such as military police whilst operating both in cities and isolated rural areas. A complete functional harmonisation will be a long-term process due to the deep divergences between the two institutions. For example, the gendarmerie was organised with officers, non-commissioned officers and soldiers, whereas the national police had a four-corps structure of peacekeepers, peace officers, inspectors and commissioners.  The gendarmes were subject to availability requirements as per the military regime, while the police benefited from a human resources management system, closer to the rest of the civil service administrations. The Chain of Command among the gendarmes was inspired by the military system, which uses a staff-type structure consisting of functional offices (B1 to B9), whereas the command structure of the national police was a mixture of administrative and paramilitary aspects with technical directorates, central directorates, etc. As a result, many challenges arose when the staff of the two former institutions were transferred and reclassified into the new corps and ranks. A key opportunity and enabler for the merger was the previous internal police reform process which adopted a two-corps organisation (non-commissioned officers and officers), which facilitated the transfer and reclassification for the merger.

On the operational level, gendarmes and police officers do not have the same approach for conducting their work. For example, the use of warning shots for law enforcement was not authorised for police officers, whereas gendarmes were allowed to revert to this measure. In May 2019, violent clashes in Cotonou pitted demonstrators against the republican police and the army, who were accused of firing live ammunition. This incident illustrates operational difficulties for the police that remain to be addressed.  

Whilst the police has performed its duties in urban areas, the gendarmerie has been perceived as an institution representing the State in the countryside. In addition, public space, public order and safety are concepts with different meanings and interpretations in rural and urban areas. For example, the function of local intelligence gathering occupies an important place in the police function and is highly organised, whereas the gendarmerie engages in terrain surveillance and practices mobility of units for operational defence of the territory.

Beyond these initial differences, a major challenge is to bring together very different institutional cultures and individual perceptions of their role in Beninese society. The personnel of the two institutions did not have the same codes, nor the same social representations of the service they render to the population. The gendarmerie emphasized its republican character as the protector of State institutions, while the police demanded greater proximity to the population, to whom it provided a public service of security and protection of citizens' rights.

Conclusion and Way Forward

The medium and long-term success of the merger process requires the establishment of a rigorous monitoring and evaluation system. The creation of a single internal security organisation should in theory strengthen its effectiveness by allowing pooling means and resources and covering more localities. It is nevertheless crucial to be able to monitor the merger and its long-term effects. Clear benchmarks for performance have yet to be established. Without a roadmap it is unlikely that there will be any tracking to evaluate the effectiveness of the new institution.

After the launch of the eighteen security sector reform projects included in the GAP, the decision was taken in 2019 to draft a National Security Strategy (NSS), integrating the vision of the Armed Forces General Staff and the General Directorate of the Republican Police. This initiative will have to consider key cross-cutting themes, such as the prevention of violent extremism, democratic control of the security sector, gender equality and human rights. If those topics are not mainstreamed in a sensible and sustainable manner, the risk will be that they will be subject to divergent interpretations and left to the discretion of officials at various levels.

The political vigour with which behavioural changes have been imposed on police personnel, particularly in terms of reducing harassment and petty corruption, has led to a perceived improvement in the security situation for the population on the country's main routes and in major cities. The question now arises as to the extension, viability and sustainability of the reform process, which depends largely on the State's ability to finance it and on the combined support of Benin's citizens and police officers.

Security reform processes must be backed by social and economic development programmes. The National Security Strategy currently being drawn up should fill the gaps by bringing clarity and coherence to the entire SSR process.

ISSAT Case Study Examples
ISSAT’s main role is to provide operational support to reinforce the international community's security and justice reform capacity. Through our case studies, we present our donors and community of practice with contextualized examples of reform processes that could be useful in their areas of priority. This case study is based on the observations and reflections of one of ISSAT SSR expert following a deployment in the country. The case study also aims to work as a conversation starter, and we welcome comments and contributions from our readers.

Case Study

Burkina Faso - Current Critical Security Issues

Introduction

In recent years, Burkina Faso has emerged as a country of interest for ISSAT Members. After the security events that impacted the Sahel region recently, Burkina Faso stands at a milestone in its reform and State-building processes. It been increasingly exposed to the threats and attacks of violent armed groups, targeting symbols and representatives of the State, including the defence and security forces, local leaders and political figures.

With a history of several coups, the country has entered a cycle of more frequent terrorist attacks since 2014. The northern parts of the country, bordering Mali and Niger, are particularly at risk as a result of the spill- over of their conflicts. The President, Christian Roch Kaboré, has faced demonstrations criticising his handling of the country’s recent security crisis. In December 2018, a State of Emergency was declared in several regions, granting extraordinary powers to the security forces and restricting freedom of movement and assembly in the country. In January 2019, the Prime Minister and his cabinet resigned in a context of growing violence and a new Chief of the General Staff of the Armed Forces was appointed.

The below analysis is an ISSAT Note on Burkina Faso’s current critical security issues, which ISSAT considers to be of key relevance to its Members’ priorities and programming in the country. This short knowledge product builds on ISSAT’s work, as well as on open-source documents and map out the top challenges impacting the security landscape in the country. This note also aims to be a conversation starter and ISSAT welcomes comments and contributions from its Members and Community of Practice.

Poverty and Weakness of the State Apparatus

Burkina Faso is one of the world’s poorest countries with more than half of its population living on 1.90 USD per day. It is a traditionally rural country and agriculture is its main source of income. Despite recent economic growth, poverty levels remain the same. This is partly driven by a population growth, combined with recent climate shocks. Cities are particularly affected, with an unemployment rate of 50%. Poverty, combined with a weak government and State apparatus, creates a breeding ground for social tensions and violent conflict. It also leaves room for armed groups activity, in particular in areas where the community experiences exclusion, especially among the youth, and frustration with corruption and unequal distribution of resources and wealth.

Porous Borders and Spill-over Effects from the Conflict in Mali

The broader security landscape in the Sahel region needs to be taken into consideration when examining the worsened security situation in Burkina Faso. Following the conflict in northern Mali and the military interventions led by the government and its allies in those areas, the jihadist armed groups have moved down to central Mali and have contributed, among other factors, to the rise of intercommunal violence, not only in Mali, but also in Niger and Burkina Faso.

The attacks in Burkina Faso were previously mainly conducted across the border by groups based in Mali, using the porous border areas to escape the authorities. Absence of government and State facilities due to unequal distribution of security sector presence over the country have made it possible for these groups to operate in the northern parts relatively freely, increasing their capacity and presence in the country.

While their areas of operation were at first concentrated in the administrative provinces of Soum and Oudalan, in the northern Sahel Region bordering Mali and Niger, the attacks have now spread into other administrative regions notably the Est, Boucle du Mouhoun and Northern Regions and are also threatening the capital, Ouagadougou, and the border areas with Benin and Ivory Coast.

Population Displacement

Indiscriminate attacks against civilians in Burkina Faso have led to the displacement of more than half a million people as of December 2019 (compared to 50,000 in January 2019). This represents around 3% of the country’s population, a number that is expected to increase further in 2020.

Internally displaced persons (IDPs) face several critical challenges such as food insecurity and limited access to the fields and markets. Access to basic services such as health, education, water and sanitation is also a major concern. Their presence also weight on the resources of the host communities and puts an extra burden on an already weak resource management system and public services infrastructure, leading to increasing tensions among the communities and risk of intercommunal violence.

Population displacements also impact the surveillance of the territory, and the ability of the security forces to track members of the armed groups, while there are growing concerns that IDPs and people living in refugee camps may become fertile recruitment grounds for violent extremism.

Lack of Resources and Capacity among the Security Forces

During his presidency, Blaise Compaoré reorganised the military and assumed increased control over the security apparatus of the country. After his fall, many of his followers among the security forces deserted or arrested. The Presidential Guard, which represented some 10% of the total military body, was dissolved after the coup d’état in 2015, creating an institutional and human resources gap.

Burkina Faso’s security forces are considered inadequately equipped and lack operational capacity to perform their duties. They have sometimes been accused of disproportionate use of violence, extrajudicial killings and human rights violations, including towards civilians. Furthermore, corruption, lack of accountability and weak legitimacy undermines the role of the security forces. National security personnel may also be members of non-state forces such as the Koglweogo, which is one of the largest security non-state actors in Burkina Faso. It has gradually become recognized as a key player by the government.

Several of the international donors present in the country, such as the EU, US and the Joint G5 force for Sahel are supporting programs aiming at operational capacity development, including skills and equipment provision to the security forces. However, lack of sufficient attention to management and accountability aspects in a country where those are perceived to be corrupt, politicised and abusive of their powers, is a risky endeavour.

Lingering SSR Process

In October 2017, a National Security Forum held in Ouagadougou with over 600 participants from ministries, agencies and civil society kicked-off the SSR process led by the National Defence and Security Council (CSDN). The country set itself on a reformative agenda to elaborate on a new national security policy and strategy, develop an anti-corruption strategy, increase governance of the security sector and develop a strategy to combat violent extremism, among other commitments.

However, due to the worsened security situation in the country with increased violence, more than half a million people internally displaced and lack of State presence in all parts of the country, the SSR process has been lingering. The government is now focusing on preventing violent extremism and has declared a state of emergency in 14 out of 45 regions. Lessons from Central African Republic and South Sudan indicate that stalling or halted SSR processes could be potentially an indicator of escalation in political and security tensions.

Unclear Delineation of Roles and Deployment of the Police and Gendarmerie

The National Police is placed under the authority of the Ministry of Security and organized around the General Directorate of the National Police. It is responsible for public security and consists of civil servants. The National Gendarmerie is technically under the authority of the Ministry of Defence, but reports to the Ministry of Security. It is a military force with similar ranking system to the army. The police and gendarmerie perform their activities across the country. While the law provides that a decree shall specify the respective areas of territorial jurisdiction, both police and the gendarmerie often end up working in the same locations at the expense of certain regions. The traditional role of the police to operate in urban areas and the gendarmerie in the countryside, has been blurred during the last years, leading to a shift of the National Police outside urban areas and the "urbanization" of Gendarmerie units. Despite several requests for the opening of new police stations or gendarmerie brigades in neglected areas, there is no clear plans to organise and restructure the territorial grid. This has led to inefficient use of human resources, incapability of ensuring consistent coverage of all the territory, in addition to, unequal distribution of service to the entire population.

Lack of updated information hamper the analysis of the situation. However, an assessment conducted in partnership with ISSAT in 2018 showed that security forces were absent in 36% of the communes. The ratio of security personnel of 1/758 is well below the international standard of 1/400. With a total strength of 5,219 gendarmes, the gendarmerie ratio is 1/2,685. The country has 350 territorial departments in total, 85 of which have at least one Police station and one Gendarmerie unit; 109 have one Gendarmerie unit or a Police station; and 156 do not have any Internal Security force unit established at all.

Fragmentation of the legitimate use of force

Increased violence and limited response capacity from the state security forces has led to the multiplication of defence militias and paramilitary groups such as the Koglweogo. Formed by farmers to respond to rising insecurity in the northern regions, those groups have since evolved into more organised armed groups implementing their own sets of rules and passing sentences. Those groups have established semi-formal relations with the security forces with whom they might collaborate and who sometimes hand out alleged delinquents or criminals to the traditional groups. In 2018, the government has launched several initiatives to strengthen the dialogue with the Koglweogo and has adopted a decree formally allowing them to participate in the fight against insecurity alongside the State forces.

More recently, the government adopted a new decree creating the status of “Defence Volunteers”. According to the decree, the mission of the Volunteer is to contribute, if necessary, by force of arms, to the defence and protection of persons and property in his or her village or area of residence. After going through initial military training for fourteen days, the Volunteers will receive a weapon and are placed under the supervision of a group leader chosen among his peers at the village level. The groups are loosely placed under the military chain of command, though it is unclear how this control will be implemented.

Koglweogo and similar community defence have already been accused of committing human rights violations and their activities are often inconsistent with the respect of basic rule of law principles such as the presumption of innocence. They however beneficiate from the support of the population, tired of the state's inability to ensure one of its basic functions: the safety of citizens. The legitimation and legalisation of such groups therefore raise the question of the State’s ability to control them and of the risk of a fragmentation of the legitimate use of force.

Weapons proliferation and intercommunal violence

The trafficking and diversion of weapons and ammunition are fuelling the conflict in the Sahel and continue to threaten community safety across the region, in particular in Burkina Faso, Mali, and Niger. Burkina Faso is located along some of the most important weapons trafficking routes in West Africa. Traffickers make use of the porous border areas to link the gulf countries to main recipient countries such as Mali, making weapons easily accessible. Important stocks were also diverted from the government stockpile during the 2011 police and military mutiny. To prevent the worsening of the situation, the Burkinabe government suspended the sale of firearms to the civilian population at the end of February 2019. However, after only a few months, the measure was lifted in June. In early 2020, the government took a reverse approach by creating the status of “Defence Volunteer”, therefore giving access to weapons to civilians and legitimizing their use of force to supplement the security forces.

However, in a country where intercommunal tensions and the multiplication of armed groups are already creating challenging conditions to the protection of civilians, there is a concern that the new measures could further foster the proliferation of weapons and heighten ethnic conflict. While intercommunal violence is a relatively new phenomenon in Burkina Faso, resentment and mistrust toward the Fulani communities, because of their perceived association with the Islamist groups, have increased as attacks led by armed groups have become more frequent.

2020 Elections

Burkina Faso is holding general Presidential and Parliamentary elections in November 2020. The country has a long history of coup d’état’s which weakened the election and governance system, and with the current security situation, this might make for a turbulent election process. Current armed violence and terrorist attacks are predicated to halt the election process. This is mainly due to two reasons; Firstly, as a consequence of the increased violence and terrorist attacks in the country, entire villages have been displaced and regions in the north and eastern parts have lost their population. As a result, the electoral constituencies must be reviewed to reflect the change of inhabitants. Additional local and national candidates could be put forward in regions hosting most of the displaced persons. The government might also need to find a system allowing displaced persons to elect their local candidates outside of their own constituency. IDPs could also elect candidates in the regions where they currently are located. The solution is not perfect however and might result in an unbalance of candidates as entire villages in the norther and eastern parts of the country are emptied. This also implies to rewrite the number of constituencies in each region which is a long and complicated process due to the fluctuating security landscape.

A second challenge for the upcoming elections is the registration to vote which closed in January 2020. About 50 % of the population are eligible to vote, equalling 10 million, but only half are currently registered, leaving almost 5 million people, mainly youth, noneligible to take part in the democratic election process. This situation is particularly worrying as lack of representativity in the public institutions and the feeling of exclusion are key drivers of conflict in the region.

Learn More

DCAF-ISSAT Burkina Faso SSR Country Backgrounder 

Case Study

Iraq - Current Critical Security Issues

Introduction and context

Iraq is a war-torn country which faces enormous security and justice challenges, including a large number of internally displaced persons and concerns that small cells of defeated ISIL remain hiding in rural areas. Iraq’s youth are protesting for a better future with less corruption, better governance and lower unemployment; whilst security forces are being accused of using armed violence towards civilians.

With the defeat of ISIL, Iraq can now focus on reconciliation, recovery and reform of the security and justice sector to efficiently meet the challenges the country is facing. Security sector reform and governance is pivotal for long term stability and peace in the country. The official launch of the SSR process in Iraq was made in 2015, but there are still major challenges facing security and justice sector governance.

This short knowledge product aims to address emerging concerns in a country of high interest to ISSAT Members. It builds on ISSAT’s work, as well as on open-source documents and maps out some of the critical challenges impacting the security landscape in a given country. This note also aims to be a conversation starter and ISSAT welcomes comments and contributions from its Members and Community of Practice.

Internal Population Displacement and Returnees

The humanitarian and displacement situation in Iraq are one of the world’s most volatile and acute. Large waves of displacement have been tracked for more than 50 years driven by a combination of factors such as internal armed conflict, external intervention and political, ethnic and religious oppression, in addition to natural disasters including floods and earthquakes. The latest wave of displacement began in late 2013, when ISIL began to take over large swaths of territory. At that point, 2.1 million people were already living in internal displacement due to previous conflicts. The number of IDPs peaked at 4.1 million in 2016.

A decrease in scale and intensity of armed violence in 2018 allowed for around 900,000 displaced Iraqis to return to their hometowns. Since 2014, IOM estimate that around 4.6 million (February 2020) IDPs returned to their hometowns, amidst concerns about forced IDP returns and IDP vulnerability. According to IOM, around 1.4 million Iraqis remain internally displaced (February 2020), with over seventy percent of those originating from the Northern Ninewa and Salah al-Din governorates.

IDPs face challenges in access to safety and security, fair standard of living, employment, land and property, documentation, family separation and/or reunification, participation in public affairs, and justice services. Furthermore, inter-communal divisions between host communities and IDPs are also representing a challenge for future reconciliation and reintegration. The question still remains how to reintegrate IDPs into their host communities, if they are unable to return to their place of origin.

Armed Groups and Insurgency

Insurgent attacks by Daesh fighters and Sunni militias in western and central-northern Iraq, as well as, terrorist attacks across the country, continue to threaten the safety and security of Iraqis. Citizens still feel threatened of ISIL or other extremist groups if they are not eradicated (NDI, 2019).

There is also insecurity in the south with armed tribal groups and violent confrontations between rival Shia military groups which seek to control neighbourhoods in the capital, Baghdad. The neighbouring ongoing conflict in Syria facilitates arms, drugs, refugee flow and people trafficking and enables armed groups operations.

ISIL has suffered from territorial downfall and are today almost eradicated from the territory. It is although estimated that between ten and twenty thousand ISIL fighters are still active in the region and remain a threat to stability. As a small-scale insurgency, they indiscriminately target Iraqi civilians and commit human rights abuses. The United States-led Global Coalition to Counter ISIL continues its military operations in Iraq and Turkey focuses its operations in northern Iraq. The unstable and fragile security landscape in Iraq is jeopardizing a legitimate and efficient national security sector. It further demonstrates different interests and visions among the population based on sectarian, ethnic or regional ties. 

Civil Action and Youth Discontent

Since the Fall of 2019, Iraq and especially Baghdad, has experienced civil protests, as thousands of mostly young people, have been demonstrating in different parts of the country against corruption, unemployment and poor public services. The protests, which started off in a non-violent and peaceful manner, has become more violent as time has passed. Security forces have responded using water cannons, tear gas, live rounds and rubber bullets. Several hundreds of protesters have been killed and thousands injured. Tens of thousands of residents in the southern governorate of Basra were reported to have been poisoned and hospitalized by polluted drinking water, fueling ongoing protests against government’s mismanagement of the neglected south.

Nearly 60% of Iraq’s population is under 25 years of age which is impacting the society and the country’s development. Lack of proper education, early marriages, gender inequalities and high unemployment rates are issues that affect the governance, security and justice needs by the population.

The civil protests in Iraq are one in a series of similar global mass demonstrations that have occurred over the past years. They have had significant repercussions on the security situation in the country, as they reveal shortcomings of State institutions and test the civilian accountability over security actors. Strong national consensus has been formed around the need for the government to be responsible for all firearms control and regulation and removal of all armed manifestations in public spaces. These protests in Iraq are an important watching theme for donors in the security and justice sphere, as this not only demonstrate citizen’s dissatisfaction but also reveals clashes between citizens and government, and between youth and government. Increased training and capacities in human rights training and non-violent protests controls are areas that are in need for support.

Weak Governance and State Institutions

Iraq’s public sector institutions have not been successful in equitably allocating resources across the country and its population and extend basic public services, including access to security and justice in an effective manner. In a poll from NDI 2019, most citizens see the government from federal to local level as ineffective, and a vast majority (74%) acknowledge that they are not aware of the government priorities. For decades state institutions have been captured by sectarian interests and decimated by corruption. The politicization of state institutions and control over state resources have undermined the effective and equitable delivery of services, thus exacerbating the crisis of legitimacy, the challenges to state authority, and, ultimately, the spiral of violence that we see in Iraq today. As noted in the 2011 World Development Report, weak institutions and a lack of legitimacy undermine states’ ability to provide basic security, justice, and economic opportunities for their citizens and can therefore be a key cause of conflict. This holds true in Iraq, where the fragility of key public institutions and processes is reflected most starkly in the chronic weakness of its civil service, public financial management, state-owned enterprises, public investment management, and judicial system.

Lack of Public Trust

Weak governance and accountability, unrepresentative institutions and insufficient access to security and justice services across the country result in lack of public trust in public services. A recent survey from NDI revealed that lack of public trust and low confidence in national elections, drive perceptions that Iraq remains a divided country and increases support for protests. This further strengthens divisions according to sectarian lines in society. According to the Head of UNAMI, increased public trust in governmental institutions is key for development in Iraq, particularly after the fight against ISIL. Lack of public trust is also driven by a view of ineffective and unaccountable governmental apparatus.

Despite a general lack of trust, citizens tend to do have increased trust in army and police institutions, and in the Popular Mobilization Units[1] as the security situation is slowly stabilizing. However, citizens seem to have less trust in judicial institutions and provincial councils.

Today, Iraq needs robust and functional accountability mechanisms and community reconciliation to recover from conflict and its associated societal traumas. For this aim, restoring public trust in the judiciary and justice system to hold perpetrators accountable of key importance.

Corruption

Endemic corruption is one of the main threats to Iraq’s stability, alienating the population from its ruling elite and driving young people into a protest movement that demands radical change. In a recent poll, more than 80 % of Iraqi’s were concerned, or very concerned, about corruption at the highest levels of government and the population perceive it to be getting worse. In Kurdistan, over 90% say that corruption is getting worse. Corruption among senior politicians and civil servants is systematically undermining trust in the government and destroys the legitimacy of leaders.

Transparency International (TI) scored Iraq on rank 162 out of 180 in 2019. This was a rise of six ranks compared to 2018 and Iraq is now on the same level as Cambodia and Chad. Further, Iraq was ranked by TI as the fourth most corrupt country in the Middle East, only better off than Syria, Yemen and Libya. For comparison, the three countries better than Iraq was Iran (146), Lebanon (137) and Egypt (106).

However, until now, political corruption has been primarily treated as an individual crime. Little recognition is given to corruption as primarily driven forward by the structure of the political system and the role that Iraq’s political parties play in it.

Public Financial Management

A recent survey from NDI reveals that the lack of financial stability is one of the main concerns among the population, and this sparks frustration and conflict. Enhancing public financial management is crucial for building the efficiency and effectiveness of state services and the situation in Iraq is no exception. Additionally, it is crucial to ensure accountability in the management of public resources. Weak public financial management increases the risk of mismanagement of resources and opportunities. In Iraq, formal channels by which public finance and procurement processes are managed hides the processes through which resources are raised and spent. Such parallel processes are unclear and difficult to change, especially as they tend to shift power from the state to other actors. This keeps a vicious cycle of a weak, unreliable and opaque public financial management system. 

Human Rights Violations

Human rights violations are common in Iraq. Security forces are accused of detaining suspects without court order, arrest warrant, or any other justification of arrest. Authorities are accused of violating the process for detainees to see a judge within 24 hours, to have access to a lawyer throughout interrogations or to have families notified of their detention. Detainees have witnessed torture in prisons, in some cases leading to death. Courts sentence individuals convicted of terrorism-related offences to death, frequently after questionable trials that reportedly rely on torture-tainted evidence.

Iraqi families with perceived ISIS affiliation because of their family name, tribal affiliation, or area of origin, have been denied security clearances required to obtain identity documentation or other civil documentation. This has impacted their freedom of movement, right to education, right to work, and right to apply for welfare benefits and obtain birth and death certificates. Although numerous ethnic and religious minority groups are living in Iraq, the government does not guarantee equal treatment and access to public services.  

Gender Inequality

Over recent decades, the rights of Iraqi women have been significantly weakened, and their parity with men has suffered setbacks in a number of areas. However, demands for increased gender equality are increasing.  While the legal position of women was relatively strong compared with other countries in the region and Iraqi women have traditionally taken part in society through education, labour and politics, this reality has now receded. The influence of women started to decline in the 1980s with Saddam Hussein. Women empowerment’s main constraints are largely economic, social, and cultural, driven by sectarian, ethnic and family-related boundaries. Harassment, domestic and sexual violence are constantly reported, and women have few legal frameworks that could be used to protect their rights. Iraq’s criminal code includes criminalizing physical assault but lacks any explicit mention of domestic violence, and even when sexual assault can be criminalized, it does not apply in a marriage. Donors need to not only focus on women, but also to steer gender programming to male roles and unpack traditional gender roles through for example public awareness campaigns.

Weak territorial integrity

Iraq has historically been a battleground in regional power struggles, and this is continuously reflected in its domestic political dynamics with a multiplicity of armed groups with ties to neighbouring states. While many areas of Iraq continue to be relatively secure, pockets of violence exist where armed groups continue to be active. PMU armed groups are operating and fighting in parallel with national security forces, and the myriad of security actors are undercutting state monopoly of violence and state legitimacy. This further leads to incoherent national defence and weak territorial control and integrity.

In addition, Iraqi provinces have a large margin for self-control and a legal right to create autonomous regions. One example of such a region is Kurdistan with its own judiciary, parliament and security forces, located in northern Iraq. In addition, Shia-dominated south has been demanding the right for an autonomous southern region, even though this is facing resistance from other opposing groups. With increased regional tendencies for autonomous rule along sectarian, ethnic and nationalistic lines, the State’s backbone risks further weakness and disintegration, increasing insecurity and lack of access to public services including justice by the population.

Tackling those sensitive challenges in a country like Iraq requires the presence and vested interest of regional, internal and local powers. This today is the biggest challenge Iraq is facing for its State-building and reform processes.

[1] Popular Mobilization Units (also known as Hash’d al Shaabi) are an umbrella organization consisting of more than 50 different militias with ties to the government, performing along the lines of national security forces.

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DCAF-ISSAT Iraq SSR Country Backgrounder

Case Study

Videos

Interview with Lamine Cissé

In 2013, DCAF - ISSAT had interviewed Lamine Cissé, Strategic SSR Advisor to ISSAT, where he outlined critical aspects of  Security Sector Reform (SSR) and justice reform in Guinea. A short video has been prepared with excerpts from this interview, as a tribute to Mr. Cissé, who passed away in April 2019. 

General Lamine Cissé, from Senegal, has held a number of strategic positions at the national and international level. He culminated his military career in the position of Chief of Defence Staff. This was followed by his appointment as Minister of Interior and a series of International appointments which included the post of Head of Mission for the UN mission in the Central African Republic and Head of the United Nations Office for Western Africa. More recently, he led an SSR assessment mission for ECOWAS in Guinea.

Video

SSR in The Gambia

Since 2018, DCAF has been supporting the SSR process in The Gambia through two projects, funded respectively by the EU (through the IcSP instrument) and France (focusing on police reform), with an overarching goal to support a fully inclusive, coordinated SSR process, with genuine civilian oversight.

DCAF’s recent population-based survey has shown that 80% of the population has no knowledge of the SSR process. To respond to this lack of knowledge, DCAF has engaged with media and civil society in the country to promote wide awareness-raising on SSR and the process. This documentary is part of that process. It aims to tell The Gambia’s story for SSR, to inform the viewer what SSR means for the Gambia and to promote the notion that all Gambians have a role to play in the reform of the security sector.

Video

Other Documents

Training course on "Security Sector Governance and Reform (SSG/R) contribution to Preventing Violent Extremism (PVE)"

Course Description
This course provides participants with knowledge and practical tools to better understand the drivers (root causes and triggers) of violent extremism in contexts of fragility. It includes a strong component on the security and development nexus and covers dimensions related to human security, access to justice and community violence reduction (CVR). It also touches upon the holistic nature of SSG/R, including sessions on policing, national security strategy, relations with the media and strategic communication in contexts of VE.
The course was developed acknowledging that significant improvements must be made in prioritising interventions that address the structural causes and aggravating factors that create insecurity, marginalisation, and grievances. It is in this context that the crucial role of SSG/R becomes most apparent.

Learning methodology
The course will use interactive and peer-learning activities while adopting a problem-solving approach through a series of case studies, hands-on practical exercises, simulations and group activities to help participants understand the challenges related to SSG/R in practice. An inductive approach is used in every session of the course in order to place participants at the centre of the training.

Benefits of attending
The course will enable you to:

  • Understand the drivers (root causes and triggers) of violent extremism within the context of conflict and fragility.
  • Identify and prioritise the drivers which can be managed and mitigated through SSG in the short and long term.
  • Explore and apply options for change in improving security and justice service delivery.
  • Enhance individual and collective competence in applying integrated thinking on SSG/R contribution to address violent extremism.

Who should attend
The course will target senior practitioners and professionals – including civilian, military and police personnel, as well as civil society representatives and professionals from the private sector – who are working closely on issues related to SSG/R and violent extremism such as governance, rule of law, police reform, defence reform, justice reform, disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration. The course also targets those involved in programme design, management and implementation, mission planning and delivery and/or in political/policy dialogues.
DCAF-ISSAT is commited to selecting diverse participants in terms of professional and organisational background, age and nationality, as well as gender balance.

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